S9-12:10: Students demonstrate their understanding of the Properties of Matter by

S9-12:10.1: Citing evidence of the change in our understanding of the atom and the development of atomic theory

 Bohr Model of Hydrogen
 Bohr Model: Introduction

S9-12:10.3: Writing formulae for compounds and Developing models using electron structure (e.g., Lewis dot).

 Chemical Equations
 Covalent Bonds
 Ionic Bonds

S9-12:10.a: Atoms have a dense nucleus containing positively charged protons and neutral neutrons. The number of protons in the nucleus determines the identity of an element.

 Element Builder

S9-12:10.b: The nucleus of an atom is surrounded by much lighter negatively-charged electrons in.mostly empty space.

 Element Builder

S9-12:10.c: In neutral atoms the number of protons and electrons is equal.

 Element Builder

S9-12:11: Students demonstrate their understanding of the Properties of Matter by

S9-12:11.1: Identifying and explaining the basis for the arrangement of elements within the Periodic Table (e.g., trends, valence, reactivity, electronegativity, ionization).

 Electron Configuration
 Element Builder

S9-12:11.2: Determining valence electrons of selected elements.

 Electron Configuration
 Element Builder

S9-12:11.3: Predicting the relative physical and chemical properties of an element based on its location within the Periodic Table

 Electron Configuration

S9-12:11.a: Elements (substances composed of a single type of atom) are arranged in repeating patterns within the Periodic Table.

 Electron Configuration

S9-12:11.b: The arrangement of electrons of an atom determines placement in the Periodic Table.

 Electron Configuration
 Element Builder

S9-12:14: Students demonstrate their understanding of Physical Change by

S9-12:14.1: Experimenting, graphing, and explaining the effect of heat energy on the phase changes of water from a solid state to a liquid state to a gaseous state, comparing that data to other substances, and using evidence to draw conclusions based upon these data.

 Phase Changes

S9-12:14.a: Different compounds require different amounts of energy for phase change due to their unique molecular structure.

 Phase Changes

S9-12:15: Students demonstrate their understanding of Chemical Change by

S9-12:15.1: Writing simple balanced chemical equations to represent chemical reactions and illustrate the conservation of matter (atoms).

 Balancing Chemical Equations
 Chemical Equations

S9-12:15.a: The total mass of reactants of any chemical reaction is the same as the total mass of the products of that chemical reaction (Conservation of Mass).

 Chemical Equations

S9-12:15.b: Bonds between atoms are created when electrons are paired by being transferred or shared. Many important reactions involve the transfer of either electrons or hydrogen ions between reacting ions, molecules or atoms.

 Covalent Bonds
 Ionic Bonds

S9-12:16: Students demonstrate their understanding of Chemical Change by

S9-12:16.a: During a chemical change, energy is absorbed or released (e.g., AMP, ADP, ATP or burning wood).

 Chemical Changes

S9-12:17: Students demonstrate their understanding of Nuclear Change by

S9-12:17.1: Explaining the organization of an atomic nucleus and identifying the universal forces from strongest to weakest.

 Element Builder

S9-12:17.a: The number of neutrons in the nucleus can vary and gives rise to different isotopes of an element.

 Element Builder

S9-12:17.b: Certain nuclear configurations lead to radioactive decay, producing alpha and beta particles, and ultimately a different element.

 Nuclear Decay

S9-12:18: Students demonstrate their understanding of Nuclear Change by

S9-12:18.1: Explaining the concept of half-life and using the half-life principle to predict the approximate age of a material.

 Half-life

S9-12:19: Students demonstrate their understanding of Motion by

S9-12:19.2: Using modeling and illustrating, to explain how distance and velocity change over time for a free falling object.

 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Golf Range
 Shoot the Monkey

S9-12:19.3: Modeling, illustrating, and explaining the path of an object which has horizontal and free fall motion (i.e., football, bullet).

 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Golf Range
 Shoot the Monkey

S9-12:19.b: Acceleration occurs when an object undergoes a change in velocity over time (speed up, slow down, change direction).

 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Golf Range
 Shoot the Monkey

S9-12:19.c: Motion is predictable; a falling object increases speed in a predictable pattern as it falls.

 Free-Fall Laboratory

S9-12:19.d: Motion is predictable; projectile motion combines a uniform horizontal motion and free-fall motion simultaneously

 Golf Range
 Shoot the Monkey

S9-12:20: Students demonstrate their understanding of Motion by

S9-12:20.1: Explaining how inertia affects the outcome in each of a series of situations (i.e., kicking a sand-filled football, moving a bowl of soup quickly across the table).

 Fan Cart Physics

S9-12:20.a: An object at rest or moving uniformly (in a straight line) will remain so unless acted upon by an external unbalanced (net) force (Newton?s First Law, The Law of Inertia). (e.g., We wear seatbelts because our body has a tendency to keep moving when the vehicle stops.)

 Atwood Machine
 Fan Cart Physics

S9-12:21: Students demonstrate their understanding of Force by

S9-12:21.a: Every body continues in its state of rest or in a straight line, unless it is compelled to change that state by forces impressed upon it (Newton?s First Law).

 Fan Cart Physics

S9-12:21.b: If an unbalanced force acts on an object it will accelerate; the acceleration is proportional to the net force and inversely proportional to the mass of the object (Newton?s Second Law F=ma). (e.g. A vehicle accelerates more slowly when it?s full of passengers.)

 Atwood Machine
 Fan Cart Physics

S9-12:22: Students demonstrate their understanding of Gravitational force by

S9-12:22.1: Predicting in a variety of situations how gravitational force changes when mass changes or when distance changes.

 Gravitational Force
 Pith Ball Lab

S9-12:22.a: The force of gravity is a universal force of attraction between ANY two objects and is proportional to the masses of those two objects and weakens rapidly with the distance between the objects (e.g., More mass produces more force; less distance produces more force, such as bodies in the solar system).

 Gravitational Force
 Pith Ball Lab

S9-12:23: Students demonstrate their understanding of Heat Energy by

S9-12:23.a: Different energy levels are associated with different configurations within atoms and molecules (firework explosions).

 Electron Configuration

S9-12:23.b: The total energy in an isolated system remains constant regardless of transformation. (Whenever the amount of energy in one place or form diminishes, the amount in other places or forms increases by an equivalent amount.)

 Air Track
 Energy Conversion in a System
 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

S9-12:23.c: Whenever energy is transformed from one form to another, some energy becomes less available and is transformed into heat energy, such as from engines, electrical wires, hot-water tanks, our bodies, and stereo systems (entropy).

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

S9-12:24: Students demonstrate their understanding of Electrical Energy by

S9-12:24.2: Explaining (through words, charts, diagrams, models or mathematical examples) the effects of distance and the amount of charge on the strength of the electrical force present.

 Coulomb Force (Static)
 Pith Ball Lab

S9-12:24.a: Electrical force is a universal force that arises from charge and can be attractive (between different charges) or repulsive (between similar charges).

 Coulomb Force (Static)
 Pith Ball Lab

S9-12:24.b: The strength of the electrical force is proportional to the amount of charge and weakens rapidly with distance between the charges.

 Coulomb Force (Static)
 Pith Ball Lab

S9-12:26: Students demonstrate their understanding of Electromagnetic Forces by

S9-12:26.2: Relating the particle nature of electromagnetic waves to their frequencies and to discrete changes in energy levels within atoms (e.g. red shift, blue shift, line spectra).

 Star Spectra

S9-12:26.a: Electromagnetic energy has both wave and particle properties.

 Photoelectric Effect

S9-12:27: Students demonstrate their understanding of Electromagnetic Forces by

S9-12:27.3: Explaining in words, models or diagrams how electric currents produce magnetic fields and how moving fields and moving magnets produce electric currents.

 Electromagnetic Induction
 Magnetic Induction

S9-12:27.b: Electricity and magnetism are two aspects of an electromagnetic force. Moving electrical charges produce magnetic forces and moving magnets produce electrical forces.

 Electromagnetic Induction
 Magnetic Induction

S9-12:28: Students demonstrate their understanding of Light Energy by

S9-12:28.1: Investigating examples of wave phenomena (e.g., ripples in water, sound waves, seismic waves).

 Ripple Tank

S9-12:28.b: Electricity and magnetism are two aspects of an electromagnetic force. Moving electrical charges produce magnetic forces and moving magnets produce electrical forces.

 Electromagnetic Induction
 Magnetic Induction

S9-12:30: Students demonstrate their understanding of Structure and Function-Survival Requirements by

S9-12:30.1: Predicting, explaining and drawing conclusions about the direction of movement of substances across a membrane.

 Osmosis

S9-12:30.2: Developing a model that illustrates the interdependence of cellular organelles (mitochondria, ribosomes, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, cytoplasm) in biochemical pathways within the cell (e.g. mitochondria and chloroplasts: cellular respiration and photosynthesis; nucleus and ribosomes: DNA transcription and protein synthesis).

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Cell Structure
 RNA and Protein Synthesis

S9-12:30.a: There are four basic types of organic compounds found in a cell (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids).

 RNA and Protein Synthesis

S9-12:30.c: The molecular structure of a cell membrane allows for selective transfer of substances into and out of the cell (i.e., diffusion, osmosis, facilitated diffusion, active transport).

 Osmosis

S9-12:31: Students demonstrate their understanding of Reproduction by

S9-12:31.1: Creating a model which illustrates how the DNA of all cells/tissues in an organism is produced from a single fertilized egg cell (mitosis).

 Cell Division

S9-12:31.2: Explaining how the nucleotide sequence in DNA (gene) directs the synthesis of specific proteins needed by a cell (e.g., protein synthesis) and cell division.

 RNA and Protein Synthesis

S9-12:31.a: Every body cell in an organism contains the identical genome (DNA) which is maintained from one cell generation to the next by mitosis and DNA replication.

 Cell Division

S9-12:31.c: The genetic information in a cell?s DNA is used to direct the synthesis of the thousands of proteins that each cell requires, however only portions of the genome are active in any one cell.

 RNA and Protein Synthesis

S9-12:31.d: Genetic variation in organisms arises from gamete formation and sexual reproduction.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection

S9-12:32: Students demonstrate their understanding of Differentiation by

S9-12:32.b: Unicellular organisms lack differentiation, but sub-cellular units carry out all life functions.

 Paramecium Homeostasis

S9-12:33: Students demonstrate their understanding of how Energy Flow Within Cells Supports an Organism?s Survival by

S9-12:33.1: Comparing and contrasting the structure of mitochondria and chloroplasts as cell organelles, the interrelatedness of their functions, and their importance to the survival of all cells.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Cell Structure

S9-12:33.2: Describing and justifying a possible flow of energy from the environment through an organism to the cellular level, and through the cell from assimilation through storage in ATP.

 Food Chain

S9-12:33.a: In living systems, energy flows through matter and is stored and released through chemical reactions. Basic survival energy transformations between cells and their environment include aerobic and anaerobic respiration and photosynthesis reactions. Energy is necessary for work to be accomplished and life to be sustained (e.g., At the cellular level, this work can be growth, repair, reproduction, and synthesis).

 Cell Energy Cycle

9-12:34: Students demonstrate their understanding of Energy Flow in an Ecosystem by

9-12:34.1: Diagramming or developing a model that compares the energy at different trophic levels in a given ecosystem

 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem

9-12:34.a: Energy from the sun enters all ecosystems through photosynthesis, is passed through trophic levels (producers, consumers, decomposers) with energy released as heat at every level until all the original energy is eventually released as heat (i.e., Energy Pyramid and 10% Rule).

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem

S9-12:35: Students demonstrate their understanding of Food Webs in an Ecosystem by

S9-12:35.1: Tracing the cycling of matter (e.g. carbon compounds, nitrogen compounds) within the organisms of a food web from its source through its transformation in cellular, biochemical processes (e.g., cells, organs, organisms, communities).

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Forest Ecosystem

S9-12:35.a: Within ecosystems, the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration recycle matter (i.e., carbon compounds) found within organisms and the abiotic environment.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Pond Ecosystem

S9-12:36: Students demonstrate their understanding of Equilibrium in an Ecosystem by

S9-12:36.a: Human beings are part of the earth?s many ecosystems. Human activities can deliberately or inadvertently alter the equilibrium in an ecosystem.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
 Pond Ecosystem

S9-12:38: Students demonstrate their understanding of Classification of Organisms by

S9-12:38.b: A species is the most fundamental unit of classification. Similarity of species (degree of kinship) can be substantiated by the molecular composition (e.g., DNA /amino acid sequences, biochemical similarity within species).

 Dichotomous Keys
 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

S9-12:39: Students demonstrate their understanding of Evolution/Natural Selection by

S9-12:39.b: Evolution (change over time) is based on variety within species. A greater variation within a species increases the possibility of species survival under changing conditions. Life on earth is thought to have begun four billion years ago, as simple, one-celled organisms about some of which still exist today.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

S9-12:39.c: Natural Selection provides a mechanism for evolution and leads to organisms well-suited in a particular, existing environment.

 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

S9-12:39.d.: overpopulation

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

S9-12:40: Students demonstrate their understanding of Human Heredity by

S9-12:40.2: Modeling or diagramming new gene combinations that result from sexual reproduction (e.g., dominant/recessive traits).

 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

S9-12:40.a: Instructions for specified characteristics of an organism are carried in DNA. (NSES) The information passed from parents to offspring is coded in DNA molecules. DNA molecules are long chains linking just four kinds of smaller molecules, whose sequence encodes genetic information.

 DNA Analysis
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

S9-12:40.d.: The sorting and recombination of genes in sexual reproduction results in a great variety of possible gene combinations (Include value of meiosis, but not phases).

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection

S9-12:41: Students demonstrate their understanding of Human Body Systems by

S9-12:41.1: Diagramming a feedback loop that illustrates how several human body systems work together to restore homeostasis in response to an external stimulus (environmental/behavioral) (e.g., exercise, immune response, fight/flight, stress, drugs, normal cellular metabolism, any nervous system response).

 Human Homeostasis

S9-12:41.c: Reproduction is necessary for survival of a species. (e.g., in vitro fertilization, fetal alcohol syndrome, hormone imbalances, stress).

 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

S9-12:42: Students demonstrate their understanding of the Patterns of Human Health/Disease by

S9-12:42.1: Identifying a variety of nonspecific means of protection for the human body and explaining how these maintain human health (i.e., prevent disease).

 Digestive System

S9-12:45: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Systems of the Universe by

S9-12:45.1: Explaining the process of star formation (i.e. our sun) in relation to its size, including the interaction of the force of gravity, fusion and energy release.

 H-R Diagram

S9-12:45.2: Explaining the process of the Big Bang Theory and its effect on the Universe today, citing evidence to support its occurrence (e.g., Doppler effect/red shift).

 Doppler Shift
 Doppler Shift Advanced

S9-12:45.a: Stars formed by gravitational clumping of hydrogen and helium out of clouds of molecules of these lightest elements until nuclear fusion of these light elements into heavier ones began to occur, releasing great amounts of energy over millions of years and resulting in the initial formation of elements. The process of star formation continues today, as some stars explode, creating new clouds from which other stars from and eventually dissipate with changes in matter and energy Stars differ in size, temperature and age, but appear to be made of the same elements found on earth and behave according to the same physical principles.

 H-R Diagram

S9-12:45.d: Scientific theories on the nature of the Universe have evolved significantly through the past 2000+ years Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo), and new views are emerging.

 Orbital Motion - Kepler's Laws

S9-12:46: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Earth Systems by

S9-12:46.3: Explaining the processes by which elements (e.g., carbon, nitrogen, oxygen atoms) move through the earth?s reservoirs (soil, atmosphere, bodies of water, organisms).

 Cell Energy Cycle

S9-12:46.c: The earth is a system containing essentially a fixed amount of each stable chemical atom or element. Movement of this matter between reservoirs, driven by the earth?s internal and external sources of energy, is often accomplished by a change in the physical and chemical properties of the matter in the solid earth, atmosphere, and organisms.

 Cell Energy Cycle

S9-12:47: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Earth Systems by

S9-12:47.3: Comparing the usefulness of various methods of determining the age of different rock structures (e.g. relative dating vs. C-dating vs. K-Ar dating. If rock structure is less than 500,000 years old, K-Ar dating cannot be used and C-dating can only be used for tens of thousands of years).

 Half-life

S9-12:47.b: Interactions among solid earth, atmosphere, oceans and organisms have resulted in ongoing change of earth?s systems (e.g., effects of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and glacial activity).

 Plate Tectonics

S9-12:48: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Earth Systems by

S9-12:48.3: Diagramming and explaining local and large scale wind systems (e.g., land and sea breezes and global wind patterns, Coriolis effect).

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

S9-12:48.4: Predicting weather for a particular location, using weather map data (barometric pressure, frontal systems, isobars, isotherms, mountain effects, lake/ocean effects, ocean currents, temperature/humidity) and examining world weather maps and identifying the most likely locations where extreme weather might occur (e.g., blizzards thunderstorms, hurricanes, tornadoes).

 Hurricane Motion
 Weather Maps

S9-12:48.b: The earth?s climatic patterns and weather are governed by the transfer of heat energy between atmosphere and land and oceans. Heat transfer at boundaries of atmosphere and oceans causes the circulation of wind and ocean currents, which influence the composition (temperature and moisture content) and the movement of large air masses).

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

S9-12:49: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change within Natural Resources by

S9-12:49.3: Explaining a natural chemical cycle that has been disrupted by human activity and predict what the long term effect will be on organisms (e.g., acid precipitation, global warming, ozone depletion, pollution of water by phosphates, mercury, PCBs,etc.).

 Carbon Cycle

S9-12:49.a: Human activities can enhance potential for accelerating rates of natural change.

 Rabbit Population by Season

Correlation last revised: 4/4/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.