S7-8:9: Students demonstrate their understanding of the Properties of Matter by

S7-8:9.2: Explaining why all three states of matter can be observed in a room that has a uniform temperature.

 Phases of Water

S7-8:9.a: The density of a substance can be measured and quantified as the mass (amount of a substance) that is contained per unit volume of that substance.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory

S7-8:9.c: All substances have a unique temperature at which a change in phase (state of matter) occurs. Boiling point and freezing or melting point refers to these unique phase change temperatures.

 Phase Changes
 Phases of Water

S7-8:10: Students demonstrate their understanding of the Properties of Matter by

S7-8:10.c: An element is a substance in which the atoms are all the same.

 Element Builder

S7-8:12: Students demonstrate their understanding of the States of Matter by

S7-8:12.1: Modeling (plays, models, diagrams) molecular motion of the three states of matter and explaining how that motion defines each state.

 Phase Changes
 Phases of Water

S7-8:12.a: Atoms and molecules are in perpetual motion.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

S7-8:12.d: The atoms in gases move freely apart from one another, and collide with one another.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

S7-8:14: Students demonstrate their understanding of Physical Change by

S7-8:14.1: Constructing their own models that represent the states of matter at the molecular level and explaining the effect of increased and decreased heat energy on the motion and arrangement of molecules.

 Phase Changes
 Phases of Water
 Temperature and Particle Motion

S7-8:14.a: Increased temperature of substances causes increased motion of the atoms and molecules in the substance.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

S7-8:14.b: As the temperature and motion of molecules in a substance increase, the space between molecules in the substance increases possibly causing a change in state.

 Phase Changes
 Phases of Water

S7-8:15: Students demonstrate their understanding of Chemical Change by

S7-8:15.1: Observing evidence of chemical change and offering qualitative explanations for the observed changes in substances in terms of interaction and rearrangement of the atoms, and the production of new substances with different characteristics, but the same mass as the original substance.

 Chemical Changes

S7-8:15.a: Chemical change is a transformation of matter that results from the interaction of the molecules in a substance and a new substance results (e.g., electrolysis of water). Chemical change is not reversible.

 Chemical Changes

S7-8:15.b: During chemical change, the atoms in the substances are rearranged and because the mass of the product of a chemical reaction is the same as the mass of the reactants in that reaction, we know the total number of atoms in the substances stays the same (Conservation of Mass).

 Chemical Equations

S7-8:19: Students demonstrate their understanding of Motion by

S7-8:19.a: Velocity indicates the speed and the direction of a moving object.

 Measuring Motion

S7-8:19.b: Momentum is the characteristic of an object in motion that depends on the object?s mass and velocity. Momentum provides the ability for a moving object to stay in motion without an additional force.

 2D Collisions
 Air Track
 Roller Coaster Physics

S7-8:19.c: Acceleration is a relationship between the force applied to a moving object and the mass of the object (Newton?s Second Law).

 Fan Cart Physics
 Force and Fan Carts

S7-8:21: Students demonstrate their understanding of Force by

S7-8:21.a: An object that is not subjected to a force will continue to move at a constant speed and in a straight line.

 Fan Cart Physics
 Force and Fan Carts

S7-8:21.b: If more than one force acts on an object along a straight line, then the forces will reinforce or cancel one another,depending on their direction and magnitude.

 Free-Fall Laboratory

S7-8:22: Students demonstrate their understanding of Gravitational force by

S7-8:22.a: The force of gravity depends on the amount of mass objects have and how far apart they may be.

 Gravitational Force

S7-8:22.b: The force of gravity is hard to detect unless at least one of the objects has considerable mass.

 Gravitational Force

S7-8:23: Students demonstrate their understanding of Heat Energy by

S7-8:23.1: Creating a diagram, model, or analogy for a material in a warm and cool state, showing or describing the motion of the molecules.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

S7-8:23.2: Creating a diagram, model, or analogy to explain differences among conduction, convection, and radiation, and using their visual to explain how heat energy travels in different directions and through different materials by each method of energy transfer.

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Transfer by Conduction
 Radiation

S7-8:23.a: Heat energy is the motion of molecules.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

S7-8:23.c: Increased temperature causes increased motion of molecules and increases the heat energy of they system.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Temperature and Particle Motion

S7-8:23.d: Heat energy is transferred by: Conduction?Collision of molecules in solids. Convection?Organized flow of heat currents through a fluid. Radiation?Transfer by waves that can travel through a vacuum.

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

S7-8:24: Students demonstrate their understanding of Electrical Energy by

S7-8:24.1: Building an electric circuit and explaining the transfer of electrical energy into heat, light, and sound, leaving the system, but not destroyed.

 Advanced Circuits
 Circuit Builder
 Circuits

S7-8:28: Students demonstrate their understanding of Light Energy by

S7-8:28.1: Designing demonstrations that represent the characteristics of light energy transfer.

 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

S7-8:28.2: Explaining that visible light is made up of colored light waves.

 Additive Colors
 Herschel Experiment
 Radiation

S7-8:28.b: Transmitted light can be refracted (change in direction of the light) when it passes from one medium into another.

 Basic Prism
 Refraction

S7-8:28.c: Visible light is part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Visible (white) light is made up of colored light waves of the visible spectrum.

 Additive Colors
 Basic Prism
 Herschel Experiment

S7-8:30: Students demonstrate their understanding of Structure and Function-Survival Requirements by

S7-8:30.1: Conducting experiments that investigate how different concentrations of materials (inside and outside a cell) will cause water to flow into or out of cells.

 Osmosis

S7-8:30.2: Examining cells under a microscope and identifying cell wall and chloroplasts, and by comparing the function of a common cell structure, such as membrane in all cells, with the functio n of a unique structure, such as chloroplasts in plant cells.

 Cell Structure
 RNA and Protein Synthesis

S7-8:30.b: The nucleus of a cell contains the genes. Every cell contains a complete set of genes for that organism.

 RNA and Protein Synthesis

S7-8:30.d: Plant cells have a cell wall in addition to a cell membrane. The cell wall provides structural support for the cell. The cell membrane regulates the movement of materials into and out of a cell.

 Cell Structure

S7-8:30.e: Most plant cells contain chloroplasts where green pigment traps the energy from sunlight and transforms it from light energy into chemical energy.

 Cell Energy Cycle

S7-8:30.f: Some materials can pass into and out of cells as concentrations move toward equilibrium (diffusion).

 Osmosis

S7-8:31: Students demonstrate their understanding of Reproduction by

S7-8:31.a: Cells only come from other cells.

 Cell Division

S7-8:31.b: Cells repeatedly divide to make more cells for growth and repair.

 Cell Division

S7-8:31.d: When cells divide, they are reproducing asexually.

 Cell Division

S7-8:31.e: As a result of asexual reproduction, new cells (organisms) are identical to the parent cell.

 Cell Division

S7-8:34: Students demonstrate their understanding of Energy Flow in an Ecosystem by

S7-8:34.1: Describing how light is transformed into chemical energy by producers and how this chemical energy is used by all organisms to sustain life (e.g., using a word equation rather than a chemical equation).

 Forest Ecosystem

S7-8:34.b: All organisms release the energy stored in sugar (food) through a chemical change that requires oxygen and produces carbon dioxide and water in addition to energy. Some consumers eat plants directly (herbivores). Some consumers eat other animals (carnivores) and use the energy from the plant?s sugar food that was stored in the animal?s cells. Some consumers eat both plant and animal material (omnivore).

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem
 Prairie Ecosystem

S7-8:37: Students demonstrate their understanding of Recycling in an Ecosystem by

S7-8:37.a: When decomposers break down the matter contained in plants and animals, the molecules of matter can be recycled through the ecosystem and used by plants to produce food or as building material for all organisms.

 Forest Ecosystem

S7-8:37.b: As matter is transferred from one organism to another in an ecosystem, the total amount (mass) remains the same.

 Cell Energy Cycle

S7-8:38: Students demonstrate their understanding of Classification of Organisms by

S7-8:38.1: Comparing and sorting organisms with similar characteristics into groups based on internal and external structures recognized by scientists.

 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

S7-8:38.a: Scientists organize the vast diversity of organisms by describing similarities and differences among living things. Details of internal and external structures of organisms are more important for scientific classification than behavior and general appearance.

 Dichotomous Keys
 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

S7-8:39: Students demonstrate their understanding of Evolution/Natural Selection by

S7-8:39.1: Identifying that traits occur randomly.

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

S7-8:39.2: Explaining that advantageous traits of organisms are passed on through reproduction.

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

S7-8:39.b: As environments change, organisms that possess advantageous traits (those that enable them to survive) pass those traits to offspring through reproduction.

 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

S7-8:40: Students demonstrate their understanding of Human Heredity by

S7-8:40.1: Explaining how traits are passed on from the instructions of one or more genes that are inherited from the parents.

 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

S7-8:40.a: Every organism requires a set of instructions (genes) for specifying its traits. Heredity is the passage of these instructions from one generation to another.

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

S7-8:40.b: As a result of sexual reproduction, half of an individual?s traits come from one parent, half from the other.

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

S7-8:40.c: An inherited trait of an individual can be determined by one or by many genes, and a single gene can influence more than one trait.

 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

S7-8:42: Students demonstrate their understanding of the Patterns of Human Health/Disease by

S7-8:42.a: Viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites may infect then human body and interfere with normal body functions.

 Virus Lytic Cycle

S7-8:45: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Systems of the Universe by

S7-8:45.1: Identifying and labeling the location of the sun in our solar system and its relationship to the galaxy.

 Solar System Explorer

S7-8:48: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Earth Systems by

S7-8:48.1: Diagramming, labeling and explaining the process of the water cycle (precipitation, evaporation, condensation, runoff, ground water, transpiration).

 Water Cycle

S7-8:48.3: Explaining how differential heating can affect the earth?s weather patterns.

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons in 3D

S7-8:48.4: Creating a model showing the tilt of the earth on its axis and explaining how the sun?s energy hitting the earth surface creates the seasons.

 Seasons: Why do we have them?
 Summer and Winter

S7-8:48.a: The cycling of water in and out of the atmosphere plays an important role in determining climatic patterns. Water evaporates from the surface of the earth, rises and cools, condenses into rain or snow, and falls again to the surface. Global patterns of atmospheric movement influence local weather. Oceans have a major effect on climate because water in the oceans holds a large amount of heat.

 Water Cycle

S7-8:48.c: Heat from the sun is the primary source of energy for changes on the earth?s surface. The differences in heating of the earth?s surface produce the planet?s weather patterns.

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons in 3D

S7-8:48.d: Seasons result from variations in the amount of sun?s energy hitting the earth?s surface. This happens because of the tilt of the earth?s axis and the orbit of the earth around the sun.

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons in 3D
 Seasons: Why do we have them?
 Summer and Winter

S7-8:49: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change within Natural Resources by

S7-8:49.2: Identifying a human activity in a local environment and determining the impact of that activity on a specific (local) natural resource.

 Pond Ecosystem

S7-8:49.3: Researching the impact of different human activities on the earth?s land, waterways and atmosphere, and describing possible effects on the living organisms in those environments.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Pond Ecosystem

S7-8:49.a: Human activities have impacts on natural resources, such as increasing wildlife habitats, reducing/managing the amount of forest cover, increasing the amount and variety of chemicals released into the atmosphere and farming intensively. Some of these changes have decreased the capacity of the environment to support life forms. Others have enhanced the environment to support greater availability of resources.

 Pond Ecosystem

Correlation last revised: 4/4/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.