S5-6:9: Students demonstrate their understanding of the Properties of Matter by

S5-6:9.1: Investigating and developing conclusions that explain how the relative volume or mass of an object affects the density of the object.

 Density
 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory

S5-6:9.a: All substances have a unique density that depends on the volume (amount of space) that the substance is packed into.

 Density
 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory

S5-6:9.b: The relative densities of substances can be observed and described.

 Density
 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory
 Mineral Identification

S5-6:13: Students demonstrate their understanding of the Properties of a Gas by

S5-6:13.a: Gas is a state of matter that has mass.

 Phases of Water

S5-6:14: Students demonstrate their understanding of Physical Change by

S5-6:14.1: Predicting the effect of heating and cooling on the physical state and the mass of a substance.

 Phases of Water

S5-6:15: Students demonstrate their understanding of Chemical Change by

S5-6:15.1: Observing evidence of simple chemical change to identify that new substances are formed when a chemical reaction has occurred (e.g., rusted nail, vinegar combined with baking soda).

 Chemical Changes

S5-6:15.a: Simple chemical reactions will produce new substances that might be indicated by a different state of matter, a color change, or a temperature change of the substances.

 Chemical Changes
 Chemical Equations

S5-6:19: Students demonstrate their understanding of Motion by

S5-6:19.1: Measuring and calculating speed (the distance an object moves over a measured amount of time).

 Free Fall Tower
 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Measuring Motion

S5-6:19.a: Speed indicates the rate at which an object is traveling.

 Measuring Motion

S5-6:19.b: Speed is a relationship between the distance an object travels and time elapsed.

 Free Fall Tower
 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Measuring Motion

S5-6:20: Students demonstrate their understanding of Motion by

S5-6:20.a: Inertia is the tendency of an object to resist a change in motion and depends upon the object?s mass. Stationary objects tend to remain stationary; moving objects tend to continue moving (Newton?s First Law).

 Force and Fan Carts

S5-6:21: Students demonstrate their understanding of Force by

S5-6:21.1: Investigating variables that change an object?s speed, direction, or both, and identifying and describing the forces that cause the change in motion.

 Force and Fan Carts

S5-6:21.a: A force applied to a moving object will change the object?s speed, direction or both.

 Force and Fan Carts

S5-6:21.b: Friction is a force that often opposes motion.

 Force and Fan Carts

S5-6:21.c: Gravity and magnetism are examples of long-range forces that do not require direct contact of the interacting objects.

 Free Fall Tower
 Free-Fall Laboratory

S5-6:22: Students demonstrate their understanding of Gravitational force by

S5-6:22.1: Predicting and explaining the effect of gravitational forces between pairs of objects (i.e., earth and objects? on the surface, earth and moon, earth and sun).

 Tides

S5-6:22.a: Gravity is the force that holds objects to the earth?s surface, keeps planets in orbit around the sun, and governs the rest of the motion in the solar system.

 Free Fall Tower
 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Gravity Pitch

S5-6:23: Students demonstrate their understanding of Heat Energy by

S5-6:23.a: Heat energy only flows from high temperature to lower temperature in order to reach equilibrium (same temperature).

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Transfer by Conduction

S5-6:23.b: Heat can move from one object to another by conduction.

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Transfer by Conduction

S5-6:24: Students demonstrate their understanding of Electrical Energy by

S5-6:24.1: Exploring, describing and explaining the behavior of charged objects (static electricity) in terms of charges and equilibrium.

 Charge Launcher

S5-6:28: Students demonstrate their understanding of Light Energy by

S5-6:28.1: Designing demonstrations that represent the characteristics of light energy transfer.

 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

S5-6:28.b: When light hits an object, it is absorbed, reflected, transmitted or some combination.

 Color Absorption
 Heat Absorption
 Herschel Experiment

S5-6:29: Students demonstrate their understanding of Sound Energy by

S5-6:29.a: Sound is produced by vibrations in materials that set up wavelike disturbances that spread away from the source.

 Longitudinal Waves

S5-6:30: Students demonstrate their understanding of Structure and Function-Survival Requirements by

S5-6:30.a.: Obtain food (energy) and materials for growth and repair,

 Cell Structure
 Cell Division

S5-6:30.b: All cells are enclosed in a membrane that allows materials to pass into and out of the cell.

 Cell Structure

S5-6:32: Students demonstrate their understanding of Differentiation by

S5-6:32.b: Groups of similar cells connect and work together to form tissue. Groups of tissue form organs, and groups of organs form systems.

 Digestive System

S5-6:34: Students demonstrate their understanding of Energy Flow in an Ecosystem by

S5-6:34.1: Developing a model that shows how the flow of energy from the sun is transferred to organisms as food in order to sustain life.

 Food Chain

S5-6:34.a: Energy within an ecosystem originates from the sun. Plants use energy from the sun, carbon dioxide, and water, to make energy rich food and oxygen. Plants are producers.

 Energy Conversions
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem

S5-6:34.b: Animals eat food that plants make combined with oxygen to produce energy, carbon dioxide, and water. Animals are consumers.

 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem

S5-6:35: Students demonstrate their understanding of Food Webs in an Ecosystem by

S5-6:35.a: Food webs model the interdependent relationships that organisms engage in as they acquire their food and energy needs. Aquatic food webs (fresh water and marine) are supported by microscopic ocean plants. Land (terrestrial) food webs are supported by land plants.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem

S5-6:36: Students demonstrate their understanding of Equilibrium in an Ecosystem by

S5-6:36.a: The number of organisms an ecosystem can support depends on the kinds of organisms present and the availability of biotic and abiotic resources (i.e., quantity of light and water, range of temperatures, and soil composition).

 Pond Ecosystem
 Rabbit Population by Season

S5-6:37: Students demonstrate their understanding of Recycling in an Ecosystem by

S5-6:37.1: Tracing the flow of energy through an ecosystem and identifying the recycling role of decomposers in a variety of situations.

 Forest Ecosystem

S5-6:37.a: Decomposers, primarily bacteria and fungi, are consumers that use waste material and dead organisms for food.

 Forest Ecosystem

S5-6:39: Students demonstrate their understanding of Evolution/Natural Selection by

S5-6:39.1: Explaining, through engaging in simulations, how a variation in a characteristic (trait) enables an organism to survive in a changing environment.

 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

S5-6:39.a: When the environment changes some plants and animals with advantageous traits are able to survive; others, with less-advantageous traits, either move to new locations or die.

 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

S5-6:41: Students demonstrate their understanding of Human Body Systems by

S5-6:41.1: Investigating circumstances that affect more than one body system and explaining the interconnected relationship among the body systems (e.g., the effects of exercise on several interdependent body systems, such as respiratory, circulatory, digestive, nervous, skeletal systems).

 Circulatory System
 Digestive System

S5-6:41.a.: The digestive system processes the food that cells need.

 Digestive System

S5-6:44: Students demonstrate their understanding of Characteristics of the Solar System by

S5-6:44.1: Creating a diagram or model and explaining the effects of the orbit of the earth around the sun and the moon around the earth.

 2D Eclipse
 3D Eclipse
 Eclipse
 Tides

S5-6:44.b: The moon?s orbit around the earth, once in about 28 days, changes the portion of the moon visible to us as a result of the sun?s reflected light (phases of the moon).

 Phases of the Moon

S5-6:46: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Systems of the Universe by

S5-6:46.1: Using data about a rock?s physical characteristics to explain the rock?s history and connection to the Rock Cycle.

 Rock Cycle

S5-6:46.a: Rocks come from magma or lava, as well as from sediments that build up in layers. As all rocks from earth?s surface weather, form sediments and become buried and heated (through pressure or direct heat), they may crystallize into new rock. Eventually those new rocks may be brought to the surface by forces that drive plate motions (The Rock Cycle).

 Rock Cycle

S5-6:47: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Earth Systems by

S5-6:47.2: Plotting locations of volcanoes and earthquakes and using these data to explain the relationship between location and plate movement.

 Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station
 Plate Tectonics

S5-6:47.a: Some changes on the earth can be very slow, such as weathering and mountain-building, and some can be very fast?such as volcanoes and earthquakes.

 Plate Tectonics

S5-6:47.b: Earth?s rigid shell is composed of large plates that move at rates of centimeters a year. Major geologic events, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and mountain building, result from these plate motions.

 Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station
 Plate Tectonics

S5-6:48: Students demonstrate their understanding of Processes and Change over Time within Earth Systems by

S5-6:48.1: Diagramming, labeling and explaining the process of the water cycle (e.g., evaporation, precipitation, run-off).

 Water Cycle

S5-6:48.a: The cycling of water in and out of the atmosphere plays an important role in determining climatic patterns. Water evaporates from the surface of the earth, rises and cools, and falls again to the surface as rain. The water falling on land collects in rivers and lakes, soil and porous layers of rock, and much of it flows back into the ocean.

 Water Cycle

Correlation last revised: 4/4/2018

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