I: Students will understand the structure of matter.

I.1: Describe the structure of matter in terms of atoms and molecules.

I.1.c: Diagram the arrangement of particles in the physical states of matter (i.e., solid, liquid, gas).

 Phases of Water

I.2: Accurately measure the characteristics of matter in different states.

I.2.b: Use observations to predict the relative density of various solids and liquids.

 Density Laboratory

I.2.c: Calculate the density of various solids and liquids.

 Density Laboratory

I.2.d: Describe the relationship between mass and volume as it relates to density.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory

II: Students will understand the relationship between properties of matter and Earth's structure.

II.1: Examine the effects of density and particle size on the behavior of materials in mixtures.

II.1.b: Calculate the density of earth materials (e.g., rocks, water, air).

 Density Laboratory

III: Students will understand that the organs in an organism are made of cells that have structures and perform specific life functions.

III.1: Observe and describe cellular structures and functions.

III.1.b: Observe and distinguish the cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, chloroplast, and cytoplasm of cells.

 Cell Structure

III.1.c: Differentiate between plant and animal cells based on cell wall and cell membrane.

 Cell Structure

III.1.d: Model the cell processes of diffusion and osmosis and relate this motion to the motion of particles.

 Osmosis

III.1.e: Gather information to report on how the basic functions of organisms are carried out within cells (e.g., extract energy from food, remove waste, produce their own food).

 Cell Energy Cycle

III.2: Identify and describe the function and interdependence of various organs and tissues.

III.2.a: Order the levels of organization from simple to complex (e.g., cell, tissue, organ, system, organism).

 Circulatory System

III.2.b: Match a particular structure to the appropriate level (e.g., heart to organ, cactus to organism, muscle to tissue).

 Circulatory System

III.2.c: Relate the structure of an organ to its component parts and the larger system of which it is a part.

 Circulatory System
 Digestive System

III.2.d: Describe how the needs of organisms at the cellular level for food, air, and waste removal are met by tissues and organs (e.g., lungs provide oxygen to cells, kidneys remove wastes from cells).

 Cell Structure
 Digestive System
 Paramecium Homeostasis

IV: Students will understand that offspring inherit traits that make them more or less suitable to survive in the environment.

IV.1: Compare how sexual and asexual reproduction passes genetic information from parent to offspring.

IV.1.a: Distinguish between inherited and acquired traits.

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)
 Reverse the Field

IV.1.b: Contrast the exchange of genetic information in sexual and asexual reproduction (e.g., number of parents, variation of genetic material).

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

IV.1.c: Cite examples of organisms that reproduce sexually (e.g., rats, mosquitoes, salmon, sunflowers) and those that reproduce asexually (e.g., hydra, planaria, bacteria, fungi, cuttings from house plants).

 Pollination: Flower to Fruit

IV.1.d: Compare inherited structural traits of offspring and their parents.

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

IV.2: Relate the adaptability of organisms in an environment to their inherited traits and structures.

IV.2.b: Cite examples of traits that provide an advantage for survival in one environment but not other environments.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

V: Students will understand that structure is used to develop classification systems.

V.1: Classify based on observable properties.

V.1.c: Defend the importance of observation in scientific classification.

 Dichotomous Keys

V.1.d: Demonstrate that there are many ways to classify things.

 Dichotomous Keys

V.2: Use and develop a simple classification system.

V.2.a: Using a provided classification scheme, classify things (e.g., shells, leaves, rocks, bones, fossils, weather, clouds, stars, planets).

 Mineral Identification

V.2.b: Develop a classification system based on observed structural characteristics.

 Dichotomous Keys

V.2.c: Generalize rules for classification.

 Dichotomous Keys

V.3: Classify organisms using an orderly pattern based upon structure.

V.3.a: Identify types of organisms that are not classified as either plant or animal.

 Dichotomous Keys
 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

V.3.c: Use a classification key or field guide to identify organisms.

 Dichotomous Keys
 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

Correlation last revised: 1/20/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.