I: Students will understand that chemical and physical changes occur in matter.

I.1: Describe that matter is neither created nor destroyed even though it may undergo change.

I.1.d: Investigate chemical reactions in which the total weight of the materials before and after reaction is the same (e.g., cream and vinegar before and after mixing, borax and glue mixed to make a new substance).

 Chemical Changes

I.2: Evaluate evidence that indicates a physical change has occurred.

I.2.a: Identify the physical properties of matter (e.g., hard, soft, solid, liquid, gas).

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Mineral Identification

I.2.b: Compare changes in substances that indicate a physical change has occurred.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice

I.2.c: Describe the appearance of a substance before and after a physical change.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice

I.3: Investigate evidence for changes in matter that occur during a chemical reaction.

I.3.a: Identify observable evidence of a chemical reaction (e.g., color change, heat or light given off, heat absorbed, gas given off).

 Chemical Changes

I.3.c: Cite examples of chemical reactions in daily life.

 Chemical Changes

I.3.d: Compare a physical change to a chemical change.

 Chemical Changes

III: Students will understand that magnetism can be observed when there is an interaction between the magnetic fields of magnets or between a magnet and materials made of iron.

III.1: Investigate and compare the behavior of magnetism using magnets.

III.1.b: Investigate how magnets will both attract and repel other magnets.

 Magnetism

III.2: Describe how the magnetic field of Earth and a magnet are similar.

III.2.a: Compare the magnetic fields of various types of magnets (e.g., bar magnet, disk magnet, horseshoe magnet).

 Magnetism

IV: Students will understand features of static and current electricity.

IV.1: Describe the behavior of static electricity as observed in nature and everyday occurrences.

IV.1.c: Describe the behavior of objects charged with static electricity in attracting or repelling without touching.

 Charge Launcher

IV.1.e: Investigate how various materials react differently to statically charged objects.

 Charge Launcher

IV.2: Analyze the behavior of current electricity.

IV.2.a: Draw and label the components of a complete electrical circuit that includes switches and loads (e.g., light bulb, bell, speaker, motor).

 Circuit Builder

IV.2.c: Generalize the properties of materials that carry the flow of electricity using data by testing different materials.

 Circuit Builder

IV.2.d: Investigate materials that prevent the flow of electricity.

 Circuit Builder

IV.2.e: Make a working model of a complete circuit using a power source, switch, bell or light, and a conductor for a pathway.

 Circuit Builder

V: Students will understand that traits are passed from the parent organisms to their offspring, and that sometimes the offspring may possess variations of these traits that may help or hinder survival in a given environment.

V.1: Using supporting evidence, show that traits are transferred from a parent organism to its offspring.

V.1.b: Identify similar physical traits of a parent organism and its offspring (e.g., trees and saplings, leopards and cubs, chickens and chicks).

 Inheritance

V.1.d: Contrast inherited traits with traits and behaviors that are not inherited but may be learned or induced by environmental factors (e.g., cat purring to cat meowing to be let out of the house; the round shape of a willow is inherited, while leaning away from the prevailing wind is induced).

 Inheritance

Correlation last revised: 1/20/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.