SCI.LS: Life Science

SCI.LS1: Students use science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and an understanding of structures and processes (on a scale from molecules to organisms) to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.LS1.A: Structure and Function

SCI.LS1.A.h: Systems of specialized cells within organisms help perform essential functions of life. Any one system in an organism is made up of numerous parts. Feedback mechanisms maintain an organism’s internal conditions within certain limits and mediate behaviors.

Digestive System
Human Homeostasis
Paramecium Homeostasis

SCI.LS1.C: Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms

SCI.LS1.C.h: The molecules produced through photosynthesis are used to make amino acids and other molecules that can be assembled into proteins or DNA. Through cellular respiration, matter and energy flow through different organizational levels of an organism as elements are recombined to form different products and transfer energy.

Cell Energy Cycle

HS-LS1-3: Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.

Paramecium Homeostasis

HS-LS1-5: Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy.

Cell Energy Cycle

SCI.LS2: Students use science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and an understanding of the interactions, energy, and dynamics within ecosystems to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

SCI.LS2.A.h: Ecosystems have carrying capacities resulting from biotic and abiotic factors. The fundamental tension between resource availability and organism populations affects the abundance of species in any given ecosystem. The combination of the factors that affect an organism's success can be measured as a multidimensional niche.

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem
Rabbit Population by Season

SCI.LS2.B: Cycles of Matter and Energy Transfer in Ecosystems

SCI.LS2.B.h: Photosynthesis and cellular respiration provide most of the energy for life processes. Only a fraction of matter consumed at the lower level of a food web is transferred up, resulting in fewer organisms at higher levels. At each link in an ecosystem, elements are combined in different ways, and matter and energy are conserved. Photosynthesis and cellular respiration are key components of the global carbon cycle.

Carbon Cycle
Cell Energy Cycle
Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem
Photosynthesis Lab
Pond Ecosystem

SCI.LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

SCI.LS2.C.h: If a biological or physical disturbance to an ecosystem occurs, including one induced by human activity, the ecosystem may return to its more or less original state or become a very different ecosystem, depending on the complex set of interactions within the ecosystem.

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
Food Chain
Pond Ecosystem

HS-LS2-4: Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.

Food Chain

HS-LS2-5: Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.

Carbon Cycle
Cell Energy Cycle

HS-LS2-6: Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.

Food Chain

SCI.LS3: Students use science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and an understanding of heredity to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.LS3.A: Inheritance of Traits

SCI.LS3.A.h: DNA carries instructions for forming species’ characteristics. Each cell in an organism has the same genetic content, but genes expressed by cells can differ.

DNA Analysis
Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

SCI.LS3.B: Variation of Traits

SCI.LS3.B.h: The variation and distribution of traits in a population depend on genetic and environmental factors. Genetic variation can result from mutations caused by environmental factors or errors in DNA replication, or from chromosomes swapping sections during meiosis.

Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection

SCI.LS4: Students use science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and an understanding of biological evolution to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.LS4.B: Natural Selection

SCI.LS4.B.h: Natural selection occurs only if there is variation in the genes and traits between organisms in a population. Traits that positively affect survival can become more common in a population.

Evolution: Mutation and Selection
Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
Microevolution
Rainfall and Bird Beaks - Metric

SCI.LS4.C: Adaptation

SCI.LS4.C.h: Evolution results primarily from genetic variation of individuals in a species, competition for resources, and proliferation of organisms better able to survive and reproduce. Adaptation means that the distribution of traits in a population, as well as species expansion, emergence, or extinction, can change when conditions change.

Evolution: Mutation and Selection

SCI.LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans

SCI.LS4.D.h: Biodiversity is increased by formation of new species and reduced by extinction. Humans depend on biodiversity but also have adverse impacts on it. Sustaining biodiversity is essential to supporting life on Earth.

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.