CHEM1.PS1: Matter and Its Interactions

CHEM1.PS1.1: Understand and be prepared to use values specific to chemical processes: the mole, molar mass, molarity, and percent composition.

Chemical Equations
Stoichiometry

CHEM1.PS1.2: Demonstrate that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction by balancing chemical equations.

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

CHEM1.PS1.3: Perform stoichiometric calculations involving the following relationships: mole-mole; mass-mass; mole-mass; mole-particle; and mass-particle. Show a qualitative understanding of the phenomenon of percent yield, limiting, and excess reagents in a chemical reaction through pictorial and conceptual examples. (states of matter liquid and solid; excluding volume of gasses).

Chemical Equations
Limiting Reactants
Stoichiometry

CHEM1.PS1.4: Use the reactants in a chemical reaction to predict the products and identify reaction classes (synthesis, decomposition, combustion, single replacement, double replacement).

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations
Equilibrium and Concentration

CHEM1.PS1.5: Conduct investigations to explore and characterize the behavior of gases (pressure, volume, temperature), develop models to represent this behavior, and construct arguments to explain this behavior. Evaluate the relationship (qualitatively and quantitatively) at STP between pressure and volume (Boyle’s law), temperature and volume (Charles’s law), temperature and pressure (Gay-Lussac law), and moles and volume (Avogadro’s law), and evaluate and explain these relationships with respect to kinetic-molecular theory. Be able to understand, establish, and predict the relationships between volume, temperature, and pressure using combined gas law both qualitatively and quantitatively.

Boyle's Law and Charles' Law
Diffusion

CHEM1.PS1.9: Draw models (qualitative models such as pictures or diagrams) to demonstrate understanding of radioactive stability and decay. Understand and differentiate between fission and fusion reactions. Use models (graphs or tables) to explain the concept of half-life and its use in determining the age of materials (such as radiometric dating).

Half-life
Nuclear Decay

CHEM1.PS1.10: Compare alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of mass, charge, and penetrating power. Identify examples of applications of different radiation types in everyday life (such as its applications in cancer treatment).

Nuclear Decay

CHEM1.PS1.12: Explain the origin and organization of the Periodic Table. Predict chemical and physical properties of main group elements (reactivity, number of subatomic particles, ion charge, ionization energy, atomic radius, and electronegativity) based on location on the periodic table. Construct an argument to describe how the quantum mechanical model of the atom (e.g., patterns of valence and inner electrons) defines periodic properties. Use the periodic table to draw Lewis dot structures and show understanding of orbital notations through drawing and interpreting graphical representations (i.e., arrows representing electrons in an orbital).

Covalent Bonds
Electron Configuration
Element Builder
Ionic Bonds

CHEM1.PS1.15: Investigate, describe, and mathematically determine the effect of solute concentration on vapor pressure using the solute’s van ’t Hoff factor on freezing point depression and boiling point elevation.

Colligative Properties

CHEM1.PS2: Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

CHEM1.PS2.1: Draw, identify, and contrast graphical representations of chemical bonds (ionic, covalent, and metallic) based on chemical formulas. Construct and communicate explanations to show that atoms combine by transferring or sharing electrons.

Covalent Bonds
Ionic Bonds

CHEM1.PS2.2: Understand that intermolecular forces created by the unequal distribution of charge result in varying degrees of attraction between molecules. Compare and contrast the intermolecular forces (hydrogen bonding, dipole-dipole bonding, and London dispersion forces) within different types of simple substances (only those following the octet rule) and predict and explain their effect on chemical and physical properties of those substances using models or graphical representations.

Melting Points

CHEM1.PS3: Energy

CHEM1.PS3.1: Contrast the concepts of temperature and heat flow in macroscopic and microscopic terms. Understand that heat is a form of energy and temperature is a measure of average kinetic energy of a molecule.

Reaction Energy
Temperature and Particle Motion

CHEM1.PS3.2: Draw and interpret heating and cooling curves and phase diagrams. Analyze the energy changes involved in calorimetry by using the law of conservation of energy quantitatively (use of q = mc?T) and qualitatively.

Calorimetry Lab
Energy Conversion in a System
Phase Changes
Reaction Energy

CHEM1.PS3.3: Distinguish between endothermic and exothermic reactions by constructing potential energy diagrams and explain the differences between the two using chemical terms (e.g., activation energy). Recognize when energy is absorbed or given off depending on the bonds formed and bonds broken.

Chemical Changes
Reaction Energy

CHEM1.PS3.4: Analyze energy changes to explain and defend the law of conservation of energy.

Chemical Changes
Energy Conversion in a System

CHEM1.PS4: Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer

CHEM1.PS4.1: Using a model, explain why elements emit and absorb characteristic frequencies of light and how this is information is used.

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Photoelectric Effect

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.