4: Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.

4.P1: The Earth and celestial phenomena can be described by principles of relative motion and perspective.

4.P1.1a: Natural cycles and patterns include:

4.P1.1a.1: Earth spinning around once every 24 hours (rotation), resulting in day and night

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

4.P1.1a.3: the length of daylight and darkness varying with the seasons

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun
 Summer and Winter

4.P1.1c: The Sun and other stars appear to move in a recognizable pattern both daily and seasonally.

 Seasons Around the World

4.P2: Many of the phenomena that we observe on Earth involve interactions among components of air, water, and land.

4.P2.1c: Water is recycled by natural processes on Earth.

4.P2.1c.1: evaporation: changing of water (liquid) into water vapor (gas)

 Water Cycle

4.P2.1c.2: condensation: changing of water vapor (gas) into water (liquid)

 Water Cycle

4.P2.1c.3: precipitation: rain, sleet, snow, hail

 Water Cycle

4.P2.1c.4: runoff: water flowing on Earth s surface

 Water Cycle

4.P2.1c.5: groundwater: water that moves downward into the ground

 Water Cycle

4.P3: Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable characteristics of matter and its reactivity.

4.P3.1a: Matter takes up space and has mass. Two objects cannot occupy the same place at the same time.

 Measuring Volume
 Weight and Mass

4.P3.1c: Objects have properties that can be observed, described, and/ or measured: length, width, volume, size, shape, mass or weight, temperature, texture, flexibility, reflective- ness of light.

 Measuring Volume
 Weight and Mass

4.P3.1e: The material(s) an object is made up of determine some specific properties of the object (sink/ float, conductivity, magnetism). Properties can be observed or measured with tools such as hand lenses, metric rulers, thermometers, balances, magnets, circuit testers, and graduated cylinders.

 Magnetism
 Weight and Mass

4.P3.1f: Objects and/ or materials can be sorted or classified according to their properties.

 Mineral Identification

4.P3.1g: Some properties of an object are dependent on the conditions of the present surroundings in which the object exists. For example:

4.P3.1g.2: lighting -shadows, color

 Color Absorption
 Heat Absorption
 Penumbra Effect
 Radiation

4.P3.2b: Temperature can affect the state of matter of a substance.

 Phases of Water

4.P4: Energy exists in many forms, and when these forms change energy is conserved.

4.P4.1a: Energy exists in various forms: heat, electric, sound, chemical, mechanical, light.

 Energy Conversions
 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

4.P4.1b: Energy can be transferred from one place to another.

 2D Collisions
 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

4.P4.1c: Some materials transfer energy better than others (heat and electricity).

 Circuit Builder
 Conduction and Convection

4.P4.1d: Energy and matter interact: water is evaporated by the Sun s heat; a bulb is lighted by means of electrical current; a musical instrument is played to produce sound; dark colors may absorb light, light colors may reflect light.

 Color Absorption
 Heat Absorption

4.P4.1e: Electricity travels in a closed circuit.

 Circuit Builder

4.P5: Energy and matter interact through forces that result in changes in motion.

4.P5.1b: The position or direction of motion of an object can be changed by pushing or pulling.

 Force and Fan Carts

4.P5.1c: The force of gravity pulls objects toward the center of Earth.

 Gravitational Force
 Gravity Pitch
 Pith Ball Lab

4.P5.1d: The amount of change in the motion of an object is affected by friction.

 Force and Fan Carts
 Golf Range

4.P5.1f: Mechanical energy may cause change in motion through the application of force and through the use of simple machines such as pulleys, levers, and inclined planes.

 Levers
 Pulleys
 Wheel and Axle

4.L1: Living things are both similar to and different from each other and from nonliving things.

4.L1.1b: Plants require air, water, nutrients, and light in order to live and thrive.

 Growing Plants

4.L1.2a: Living things grow, take in nutrients, breathe, reproduce, eliminate waste, and die.

 Flower Pollination

4.L2: Organisms inherit genetic information in a variety of ways that result in continuity of structure and function between parents and offspring.

4.L2.1a: Some traits of living things have been inherited (e.g., color of flowers and number of limbs of animals).

 Inheritance

4.L2.2a: Plants and animals closely resemble their parents and other individuals in their species.

 Inheritance

4.L2.2b: Plants and animals can transfer specific traits to their offspring when they reproduce.

 Inheritance

4.L3: Individual organisms and species change over time.

4.L3.1b: Each plant has different structures that serve different functions in growth, survival, and reproduction.

4.L3.1b.3: stems, stalks, trunks, and other similar structures provide support for the plant

 Flower Pollination

4.L3.1b.5: flowers are reproductive structures of plants that produce fruit which contains seeds

 Flower Pollination

4.L3.2b: All individuals have variations, and because of these variations, individuals of a species may have an advantage in surviving and reproducing.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection

4.L4: The continuity of life is sustained through reproduction and development.

4.L4.1a: Plants and animals have life cycles. These may include beginning of a life, development into an adult, reproduction as an adult, and eventually death.

 Flower Pollination

4.L4.1d: Life cycles of some plants include changes from seed to mature plant.

 Germination

4.L4.2a: Growth is the process by which plants and animals increase in size.

 Growing Plants

4.L5: Organisms maintain a dynamic equilibrium that sustains life.

4.L5.1a: All living things grow, take in nutrients, breathe, reproduce, and eliminate waste.

 Flower Pollination

4.L6: Plants and animals depend on each other and their physical environment.

4.L6.1a: Green plants are producers because they provide the basic food supply for them- selves and animals.

 Forest Ecosystem

4.L6.1b: All animals depend on plants. Some animals (predators) eat other animals (prey).

 Forest Ecosystem
 Prairie Ecosystem

4.L6.1c: Animals that eat plants for food may in turn become food for other animals. This sequence is called a food chain.

 Forest Ecosystem
 Prairie Ecosystem

4.L6.1d: Decomposers are living things that play a vital role in recycling nutrients.

 Forest Ecosystem

4.L6.2b: The Sun s energy is transferred on Earth from plants to animals through the food chain.

 Prairie Ecosystem

4.L6.2c: Heat energy from the Sun powers the water cycle (see Physical Science Key Idea 2).

 Water Cycle

4.L7: Human decisions and activities have had a profound impact on the physical and living environments.

4.L7.1b: Over time humans have changed their environment by cultivating crops and raising animals, creating shelter, using energy, manufacturing goods, developing means of transportation, changing populations, and carrying out other activities.

 Pond Ecosystem

4.L7.1c: Humans, as individuals or communities, change environments in ways that can be either helpful or harmful for themselves and other organisms.

 Pond Ecosystem

Correlation last revised: 4/4/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.