SB1: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to analyze the nature of the relationships between structures and functions in living cells.

SB1.a: Construct an explanation of how cell structures and organelles (including nucleus, cytoplasm, cell membrane, cell wall, chloroplasts, lysosome, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, vacuoles, ribosomes, and mitochondria) interact as a system to maintain homeostasis.

 Paramecium Homeostasis

SB1.c: Construct arguments supported by evidence to relate the structure of macromolecules (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) to their interactions in carrying out cellular processes.

 RNA and Protein Synthesis

SB1.d: Plan and carry out investigations to determine the role of cellular transport (e.g., active, passive, and osmosis) in maintaining homeostasis.

 Osmosis
 Paramecium Homeostasis

SB1.e: Ask questions to investigate and provide explanations about the roles of photosynthesis and respiration in the cycling of matter and flow of energy within the cell (e.g., single-celled alga).

 Cell Energy Cycle

SB2: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to analyze how genetic information is expressed in cells.

SB2.a: Construct an explanation of how the structures of DNA and RNA lead to the expression of information within the cell via the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.

 DNA Fingerprint Analysis
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)
 RNA and Protein Synthesis

SB2.b: Construct an argument based on evidence to support the claim that inheritable genetic variations may result from: new genetic combinations through meiosis (crossing over, nondisjunction); non-lethal errors occurring during replication (insertions, deletions, substitutions); and/or heritable mutations caused by environmental factors (radiation, chemicals, and viruses).

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection

SB2.c: Ask questions to gather and communicate information about the use and ethical considerations of biotechnology in forensics, medicine, and agriculture.

 DNA Fingerprint Analysis
 Human Karyotyping

SB3: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to analyze how biological traits are passed on to successive generations.

SB3.b: Use mathematical models to predict and explain patterns of inheritance.

 Chicken Genetics
 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

SB4: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to illustrate the organization of interacting systems within single-celled and multi-celled organisms.

SB4.c: Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence to compare and contrast the characteristics of viruses and organisms.

 Virus Lytic Cycle

SB5: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to assess the interdependence of all organisms on one another and their environment.

SB5.a: Plan and carry out investigations and analyze data to support explanations about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
 Food Chain
 Rabbit Population by Season

SB5.b: Develop and use models to analyze the cycling of matter and flow of energy within ecosystems through the processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Arranging components of a food web according to energy flow. Comparing the quantity of energy in the steps of an energy pyramid. Explaining the need for cycling of major biochemical elements (C, O, N, P, and H).

 Carbon Cycle
 Cell Energy Cycle
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem
 Pond Ecosystem

SB5.c: Construct an argument to predict the impact of environmental change on the stability of an ecosystem.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

SB5.e: Construct explanations that predict an organism’s ability to survive within changing environmental limits (e.g., temperature, pH, drought, fire).

 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

SB6: Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to assess the theory of evolution.

SB6.c: Construct an argument using valid and reliable sources to support the claim that evidence from comparative morphology (analogous vs. homologous structures), embryology, biochemistry (protein sequence) and genetics support the theory that all living organisms are related by way of common descent.

 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

SB6.d: Develop and use mathematical models to support explanations of how undirected genetic changes in natural selection and genetic drift have led to changes in populations of organisms.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Microevolution
 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

Correlation last revised: 1/19/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.