ESS1: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

ESS1.1: Atmosphere, Climate, and Weather

ESS1.1.S.ESS1.11.1.2: Explain how heat and energy transfer in and out of the atmosphere; and provide examples of how it is related to weather and climate.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

ESS1.2: Composition and Features

ESS1.2.S.ESS1.11.2.1: Recognize that elements exist in fixed amounts and describe how they move through the solid Earth, oceans, atmosphere, and living things as part of geochemical cycles, such as the water, carbon and nitrogen cycles.

 Cell Energy Cycle

ESS1.2.S.ESS1.11.2.3: Explain the theory of plate tectonics.

 Plate Tectonics

ESS1.2.S.ESS1.11.2.4: Describe the movement of crustal plates and explain how the effects have altered the Earth's features.

 Plate Tectonics

ESS1.3: Fossils and Geologic Time

ESS1.3.S.ESS1.11.3.1: Identify and describe the methods used to measure geologic time, such as fossil identification, radioactive dating, and rock sequences.

 Half-life

ESS1.3.S.ESS1.11.3.2: Relate how geologic time is determined using various dating methods (e.g., radioactive decay, rock sequences, fossil records).

 Half-life

ESS1.4: Observation of the Earth from Space

ESS1.4.S.ESS1.11.4.1: Provided with geologic data (including movement of plates) on a given locale, predict the likelihood for an earth event (e.g. volcanoes mountain ranges, islands, earthquakes, tides, tsunamis).

 Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station
 Plate Tectonics

ESS1.5: Processess and Rates of Change

ESS1.5.S.ESS1.11.5.2: Relate plate movement to earthquakes and volcanic activity, and explain how it results in tectonic uplift and mountain building.

 Plate Tectonics

ESS1.5.S.ESS1.11.5.5: Trace the development of the theory of plate tectonics.

 Plate Tectonics

ESS2: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

ESS2.2: Energy

ESS2.2.S.ESS2.11.2.2: Explain how the inclination of incoming solar radiation can impact the amount of energy Earth receives on any given surface area.

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons in 3D

ESS2.3: Solar System

ESS2.3.S.ESS2.11.3.1: Explain how gravitational force influenced the formations of the planets and their moons; and describe how these objects move in patterns under its continued influence.

 Orbital Motion - Kepler's Laws

ESS3: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

ESS3.2: Stars and Galaxies

ESS3.2.S.ESS3.11.2.1: Identify and describe the characteristics common to most stars in the universe.

 H-R Diagram
 Star Spectra

ESS3.2.S.ESS3.11.2.2: Describe the ongoing processes involved in star formation, their life cycles and their destruction.

 H-R Diagram

ESS4: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

ESS4.1: Design Technology

ESS4.1.S.ESS4.11.1.1: Describe ways in which technology has increased our understanding of the universe.

 DNA Analysis
 Roller Coaster Physics

ESS4.2: Tools

ESS4.2.S.ESS4.11.2.1: Describe the use and benefits of land-based light telescopes, radio telescopes, spectrophotometers, satellites, manned exploration, probes, and robots to the study of Earth Space Science.

 Star Spectra

LS1: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, & species).

LS1.1: Classification

LS1.1.S.LS1.11.1.1: Describe how organisms are classified into a hierarchy of groups and subgroups, which are based on similarities that reflect their evolutionary relationships.

 Dichotomous Keys
 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

LS1.1.S.LS1.11.1.4: Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells according to general structure and degrees of complexity.

 Cell Structure

LS1.2: Living Things and Organization

LS1.2.S.LS1.11.2.1: Identify the structures of different types of cell parts/organelles and explain the functions they perform.

 Cell Structure
 RNA and Protein Synthesis

LS1.2.S.LS1.11.2.2: Recognize how cell functions are regulated through changes in the activity of the functions performed by proteins, and through the selective expression of individual genes; and explain how this regulation allows cells to respond to their environment and to control and coordinate cell growth and division.

 Cell Division

LS1.2.S.LS1.11.2.3: Recognize how an organism's organization and complexity accommodate its need for obtaining, transforming, transporting, releasing, and eliminating the matter and energy used to sustain it.

 Pollination: Flower to Fruit

LS1.2.S.LS1.11.2.4: Explain how the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration are interrelated and contribute to biogeochemical cycles.

 Cell Energy Cycle

LS1.2.S.LS1.11.2.7: Recognize that because all matter tends toward more disorganized states, living systems need a continuous input of energy to maintain their chemical and physical organizations.

 Food Chain

LS1.2.S.LS1.11.2.8: Use data and observation to make connections between, to explain, or to justify how specific cell organelles produce/regulate what the cell needs or what a unicellular or multi-cellular organism needs for survival (e.g., protein synthesis, DNA transport, nerve cells).

 Paramecium Homeostasis
 RNA and Protein Synthesis

LS1.3: Reproduction

LS1.3.S.LS1.11.3.2: Recognize that new heritable characteristics can only result from new combinations of existing genes or from mutations of genes in an organism's sex cells; and explain why other changes in an organism cannot be passed on.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

LS1.3.S.LS1.11.3.4: Explain or justify with evidence how the alteration of the DNA sequence may produce new gene combinations that make little difference, enhance capabilities, or can be harmful to the organism (e.g., selective breeding, genetic engineering, mutations).

 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection

LS2: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

LS2.1: Environment

LS2.1.S.LS2.11.1.1: Explain how the amount of life an environment can sustain is restricted by the availability of matter and energy, and the ability of the ecosystem to recycle materials.

 Food Chain

LS2.1.S.LS2.11.1.2: Describe how the interrelationships and interdependencies among organisms generate stable ecosystems that fluctuate around a state of rough equilibrium for hundreds or thousands of years.

 Food Chain

LS2.1.S.LS2.11.1.3: Identify the factors in an ecosystem that can affect its carrying capacity.

 Food Chain
 Rabbit Population by Season

LS2.1.S.LS2.11.1.5: Using data from a specific ecosystem, explain relationships or make predictions about how environmental disturbance (human impact or natural events) affects the flow of energy or cycling of matter in an ecosystem.

 Food Chain

LS2.1.S.LS2.11.1.6: Explain or evaluate potential bias in how evidence is interpreted in reports concerning a particular environmental factor that impacts the biology of humans.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
 Pond Ecosystem

LS2.2: Flow of Energy and Recycling of Materials

LS2.2.S.LS2.11.2.1: Use examples from local ecosystems to describe the relationships among organisms at the different trophic levels.

 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem

LS2.2.S.LS2.11.3.1: Explain that as matter and energy flow through different levels of organization in living systems and between living systems and the environment, elements, such as carbon and nitrogen, are recombined in different ways.

 Cell Energy Cycle

LS2.2.S.LS2.11.3.2: Trace the cycling of matter (e.g., carbon cycle) and the flow of energy in a living system from its source through its transformation in cellular, biochemical processes (e.g., photosynthesis, cellular respiration, fermentation).

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Food Chain
 Photosynthesis Lab

LS3: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

LS3.1: Change

LS3.1.S.LS3.11.1.1: Identify ways humans can impact and alter the stability of ecosystems, such as habitat destruction, pollution, and consumption of resources; and describe the potentially irreversible effects these changes can cause.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
 Pond Ecosystem
 Rabbit Population by Season

LS3.1.S.LS3.11.1.2: Identify ways of detecting, and limiting or reversing environmental damage.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

LS3.2: Evidence of Evolution

LS3.2.S.LS3.11.2.4: Explain evolution in terms of how the Earth's present-day life forms evolved from earlier, distinctly different species as a consequence of the interactions of (1) the potential for a species to increase its numbers, (2) the genetic variability of offspring due to mutation and recombination of genes, (3) a finite supply of the resources required for life, and (4) the ensuing selection.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Microevolution
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

LS3.2.S.LS3.11.2.6: Given information about living or extinct organisms, cite evidence to explain the frequency of inherited characteristics of organisms in a population; or explain the evolution of varied structures (with defined functions) that affected the organisms' survival in a specific environment (e.g., giraffe, wind pollination of flowers).

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Microevolution
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

LS3.3: Natural Selection

LS3.3.S.LS3.11.3.1: Explain the concept of natural selection.

 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

LS3.3.S.LS3.11.3.3: Recognize how a species' chance of survival increases with each variation of an organism within the species; and explain how, in the event of a major global change, the greater the diversity of species on Earth, the greater the chance for survival of life.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection

LS3.3.S.LS3.11.3.5: Identify and describe ways genes may be changed and combined to create genetic variation within a species.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection

LS3.3.S.LS3.11.3.6: Explain that gene mutations and new combinations may have a variety of effects on the organism, including positive and negative ones, or none at all.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection

LS3.3.S.LS3.11.3.7: Explain the concepts of Mendelian genetics.

 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

LS3.3.S.LS3.11.3.8: Use pedigree charts and Punnet Squares to determine patterns of inheritance.

 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

LS4: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

LS4.1: Behavior

LS4.1.S.LS4.11.1.1: Recognize that the immune system, endocrine system, and nervous system can affect the homeostasis of an organism.

 Human Homeostasis

LS4.1.S.LS4.11.1.2: Describe how the functions of all the human body systems are interrelated at a chemical level and how they maintain homeostasis.

 Human Homeostasis

LS4.2: Disease

LS4.2.S.LS4.11.2.1: Explain that disease in organisms can be caused by intrinsic failures of the system or infection by other organisms, and describe as well as provide examples of how some diseases are caused by: the breakdown in cellular function, congenital conditions, genetic disorders, malnutrition, and emotional health, including stress.

 Human Karyotyping

LS4.2.S.LS4.11.2.3: Describe and provide examples of how new medical techniques, efficient health care delivery systems, improved sanitation, and a more complete understanding of the nature of disease provides today's humans a better chance of staying healthier than their forebears.

 Human Karyotyping

LS4.2.S.LS4.11.2.6: Use evidence to make and support conclusions about the ways that humans or other organisms are affected by environmental factors or heredity (e.g., pathogens, diseases, medical advances, pollution, mutations).

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

PS1: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

PS1.1: Composition

PS1.1.S.PS1.11.1.2: Recognize how elements are arranged in the periodic table; and explain how this arrangement illustrates the repeating patterns among elements with similar properties, such as the relationship between atomic number and atomic mass.

 Electron Configuration
 Element Builder

PS1.1.S.PS1.11.1.4: Define isotopes; recognize that most elements have two or more isotopes; and explain that although the number of neutrons has little affect on how the atom interacts with others, they do affect the mass and stability of the nucleus.

 Element Builder

PS1.1.S.PS1.11.1.5: Scientific thought about atoms has changed over time. Using information (narratives or models of atoms) provided, cite evidence that changed our understanding of the atom and the development of atomic theory.

 Bohr Model of Hydrogen
 Bohr Model: Introduction

PS1.1.S.PS1.11.1.6: Model and explain the structure of an atom or explain how an atom's electron configuration, particularly the outermost electron(s), determines how that atom can interact with other atoms.

 Bohr Model of Hydrogen
 Bohr Model: Introduction
 Electron Configuration
 Element Builder

PS1.2: Properties

PS1.2.S.PS1.11.2.2: Determine whether an atom is either electrically neutral or an ion by referring to its number of electrons.

 Element Builder

PS1.2.S.PS1.11.2.3: Explain how the chemical properties of an element are governed by the electron configuration of atoms, and describe how atoms interact with one another by transferring or sharing the outermost electrons.

 Electron Configuration

PS1.2.S.PS1.11.2.4: Explain that radioactive materials are unstable and undergo spontaneous nuclear reactions, which emit particles and/or wavelike radiation.

 Nuclear Decay

PS1.2.S.PS1.11.2.5: Explain that states of matter rely on the arrangement and motion of molecules; and differentiate between the structures of solids, liquids, and gases.

 Phase Changes

PS1.2.S.PS1.11.2.7: Explain how properties of elements and the location of elements on the periodic table are related.

 Electron Configuration
 Element Builder

PS2: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

PS2.1: Change

PS2.1.S.PS2.11.1.2: Recognize that atoms interact with one another by transferring or sharing electrons that are furthest from the nucleus; and explain that the outer electrons govern the chemical properties of an element.

 Electron Configuration

PS2.1.S.PS2.11.1.3: Explain that compounds are formed through both ionic and covalent bonding.

 Covalent Bonds
 Ionic Bonds

PS2.1.S.PS2.11.1.4: Recognize that the rates of chemical reactions can vary greatly; and identify the factors that influence these reaction rates, such as how often the reacting atoms and molecules encounter one another, the temperature, and the properties of the reacting species, including shape.

 Collision Theory
 Electron Configuration
 Element Builder

PS2.2: Conservation

PS2.2.S.PS2.11.2.1: Explain that chemical reactions either release or consume energy.

 Chemical Changes

PS2.2.S.PS2.11.2.2: Explain that chemical reactions can be accelerated by catalysts, such as enzymes.

 Collision Theory

PS2.2.S.PS2.11.2.3: Recognize that a large number of important reactions involve the transfer of either electrons or hydrogen ions between reacting ions, molecules, or atoms.

 Chemical Changes
 Chemical Equations

PS2.3: Energy

PS2.3.S.PS2.11.3.1: Explain that all energy can be considered to be either kinetic energy, potential energy, or energy contained by a field.

 Air Track
 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Potential Energy on Shelves
 Roller Coaster Physics

PS2.3.S.PS2.11.3.2: Provide examples of how kinetic and potential energy can be transformed from one to the other.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

PS2.3.S.PS2.11.3.3: Describe how the energy associated with individual atoms and molecules can be used to identify the substances they comprise; and explain that each kind of atom or molecule can gain or lose energy only in particular discrete amounts, absorbing and emitting light only at wavelengths corresponding to these amounts.

 Star Spectra

PS2.3.S.PS2.11.3.5: Recognize that the human eye can only see a narrow range of wavelengths within the electromagnetic spectrum; and explain how the variations of wavelength within that range of visible light are perceived as differences in color.

 Herschel Experiment

PS2.3.S.PS2.11.3.6: Describe the relationship between heat and temperature, explaining that heat energy consists of the random motion and vibrations of atoms, molecules, and ions; and that the higher the temperature, the greater the atomic or molecular motion.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

PS3: The motion of an object is affected by force.

PS3.1: Forces

PS3.1.S.PS3.11.1.1: Explain that magnetic forces are related to the action of electrons and can be thought of as different aspects of a single electromagnetic force; and describe how the interplay of these forces is the basis for electric motors, generators, radio, television, and many other modern technologies.

 Electromagnetic Induction

PS3.1.S.PS3.11.1.2: Recognize that the strength of the electric force between two charged objects is proportional to the charges and, as with gravitation, is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

 Coulomb Force (Static)
 Gravitational Force
 Pith Ball Lab

PS3.1.S.PS3.11.1.3: Recognize that the strength of the gravitational force between two masses is proportional to the masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

 Gravitational Force
 Pith Ball Lab

PS3.1.S.PS3.11.1.6: Recognize that different kinds of materials respond to electric forces in various ways; and differentiate between insulators, semiconductors, conductors and superconductors.

 Circuit Builder

PS3.1.S.PS3.11.1.8: Given information (e.g., graphs, data, diagrams), use the relationships between or among force, mass, velocity, momentum, and acceleration to predict and explain the motion of objects.

 Fan Cart Physics
 Free-Fall Laboratory

PS3.2: Motion

PS3.2.S.PS3.11.2.1: Interpret and apply the laws of motion to determine the effects of forces on the motion of objects.

 Atwood Machine
 Fan Cart Physics

PS4: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

PS4.1: Design Technology

PS4.1.S.PS4.11.1.1: Recognize that the basic principles of energy, work and power are related to design technology.

 Trebuchet

PS4.3: Social Issues (Local and Global), Energy, Power, and Transportation, Manufacturing

PS4.3.A.S.PS4.11.3.1: Explain that power systems have a source of energy, a process, loads, and some have a feedback system.

 Household Energy Usage

PS4.3.A.S.PS4.11.3.3: Calculate the efficiency of an engine, and explain why a perfectly efficient engine is impossible.

 Pulley Lab

PS4.3.A.S.PS4.11.3.4: Explain the relationship between energy and power.

 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

Correlation last revised: 4/4/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.