1: Properties and Principles of Matter and Energy

1.1: Changes in properties and states of matter provide evidence of the atomic theory of matter

1.1.I: Mass is conserved during any physical or chemical change

1.1.I.a: Explain that the amount of matter remains constant while being recycled through the water cycle

 Water Cycle

1.2: Energy has a source, can be stored, and can be transferred but is conserved within a system

1.2.A: Forms of energy have a source, a means of transfer (work and heat), and a receiver

1.2.A.a: Identify thermal energy as the random motion (kinetic energy) of molecules or atoms within a substance

 Temperature and Particle Motion

1.2.A.b: Use the kinetic molecular model to explain changes in the temperature of a material

 Temperature and Particle Motion

1.2.A.c: Identify thermal energy is transferred as heat from warmer objects to cooler objects until both reach the same temperature (equilibrium)

 Conduction and Convection

1.2.A.d: Identify the type of materials that transfer energy by conduction, convection, and/or radiation

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Absorption
 Heat Transfer by Conduction
 Radiation

1.2.A.e: Describe how heat is transferred by conduction, convection, and radiation, and classify examples of each

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Transfer by Conduction
 Radiation

1.2.A.g: Predict the differences in temperature over time on different colored (black and white) objects placed under the same heat source

 Heat Absorption

1.2.A.h: Describe the interactions (i.e., repel, attract) of like and unlike charges (i.e., magnetic, static electric, electrical)

 Charge Launcher
 Magnetism

1.2.A.i: Diagram and identify a complete electric circuit by using a source (battery), means of transfer (wires), and receiver (resistance bulbs, motors, fans)

 Circuit Builder
 Circuits

1.2.A.l: Classify materials as conductors or insulators of electricity when placed within a circuit (e.g., wood, pencil lead, plastic, glass, aluminum foil, lemon juice, air, water)

 Circuit Builder

1.2.A.m: Diagram and distinguish between complete series and parallel circuits

 Circuit Builder
 Circuits

1.2.A.n: Identify advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits

 Circuit Builder

1.2.F: Energy can be transferred within a system as the total amount of energy remains constant (i.e., Law of Conservation of Energy)

1.2.F.a: Identify the different energy transformations that occur between different systems (e.g., chemical energy in battery converted to electricity in circuit converted to light and heat from a bulb)

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

1.2.F.b: Identify that, during an energy transformation, heat is often transferred from one object (system) to another because of a difference in temperature

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

1.2.F.c: Recognize and describe how energy is not lost but conserved as it is transferred and transformed

 2D Collisions
 Air Track
 Energy Conversion in a System
 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

2: Properties and Principles of Force and Motion

2.1: The motion of an object is described by its change in position relative to another object or point

2.1.A: The motion of an object is described as a change in position, direction, and speed relative to another object (frame of reference)

2.1.A.b: Classify different types of motion (e.g., straight line, projectile, circular, vibrational)

 Distance-Time Graphs
 Free Fall Tower
 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Period of a Pendulum
 Simple Harmonic Motion

2.1.A.d: Interpret a line graph representing an object's motion in terms of distance over time (speed) using metric units

 Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs

2.2: Forces affect motion

2.2.A: Forces are classified as either contact forces (pushes, pulls, friction, buoyancy) or noncontact forces (gravity, magnetism), that can be described in terms of direction and magnitude

2.2.A.a: Identify and describe the types of forces acting on an object in motion, at rest, floating/sinking (i.e., type of force, direction, amount of force in Newtons)

 Force and Fan Carts

2.2.B: Every object exerts a gravitational force on every other object

2.2.B.a: Explain every object exerts a gravitational force of attraction on every other object

 Gravity Pitch

2.2.D: Newton's Laws of Motion explain the interaction of mass and forces, and are used to predict changes in motion

2.2.D.c: Explain that a change in motion is the result of an unbalanced force acting upon an object

 Force and Fan Carts

2.2.D.d: Explain how the acceleration of a moving object is affected by the amount of net force applied and the mass of the object

 Free-Fall Laboratory

2.2.F: Work transfers energy into and out of a mechanical system

2.2.F.a: Recognize examples of work being done on an object (force applied and distance moved in the direction of the applied force) with and without the use of simple machines

 Ants on a Slant (Inclined Plane)

2.2.F.b: Calculate the amount of work done when a force is applied to an object over a distance (W = F x d)

 Ants on a Slant (Inclined Plane)

2.2.F.c: Explain how simple machines affect the amount of effort force, distance through which a force is applied, and/or direction of force while doing work

 Levers
 Wheel and Axle

2.2.F.d: Recognize the amount of work output is never greater than the amount of work input, with or without the use of a simple machine

 Ants on a Slant (Inclined Plane)

5: Processes and Interactions of the Earth's Systems (Geosphere, Atmosphere, and Hydrosphere)

5.1: Earth's systems (geosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere) have common components and unique structures

5.1.C: The atmosphere (air) is composed of a mixture of gases, including water vapor, and minute particles

5.1.C.b: Describe the role atmosphere (e.g., clouds, ozone) plays in precipitation, reflecting and filtering light from the Sun, and trapping heat energy emitted from the Earth's surface

 Carbon Cycle
 Greenhouse Effect

5.2: Earth's Systems (geosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere) interact with one another as they undergo change by common processes

5.2.E: Changes in the form of water as it moves through Earth's systems are described as the water cycle

5.2.E.a: Explain and trace the possible paths of water through the hydrosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere (i.e., the water cycle: evaporation, condensation, precipitation, surface run-off/ groundwater flow)

 Water Cycle

5.2.E.b: Relate the different forms water can take (i.e., snow, rain, sleet, fog, clouds, dew, humidity) as it moves through the water cycle to atmospheric conditions (i.e., temperature, pressure, wind direction and speed, humidity) at a given geographic location

 Water Cycle

5.2.E.c: Explain how thermal energy is transferred throughout the water cycle by the processes of convection, conduction, and radiation

 Water Cycle

5.2.F: Climate is a description of average weather conditions in a given area due to the transfer of energy and matter through Earth's systems

5.2.F.a: Explain how the differences in surface temperature, due to the different heating and cooling rates of water and soil, affect the temperature and movement of the air above

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

5.2.F.b: Describe the characteristics of air masses (i.e., high/low barometric pressure, temperature) and predict their effect on the weather in a given location

 Hurricane Motion

5.2.F.c: Identify weather conditions associated with cold fronts and warm fronts

 Weather Maps

5.2.F.d: Identify factors that affect weather patterns in a particular region (e.g., proximity to large bodies of water, latitude, altitude, prevailing wind currents, amount of solar radiation, location with respect to mountain ranges)

 Coastal Winds and Clouds
 Hurricane Motion
 Weather Maps

5.2.F.e: Collect and interpret weather data (e.g., cloud cover, precipitation, wind speed and direction) from weather instruments and maps to explain present day weather and to predict the next day's weather

 Weather Maps

5.2.F.f: Describe the significant changes in temperature and barometric pressure may cause dramatic weather phenomena (i.e., severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes)

 Hurricane Motion

5.2.F.h: Identify factors that affect climate (e.g., latitude, altitude, prevailing wind currents, amount of solar radiation)

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

6: Composition and Structure of the Universe and the Motion of the Objects Within It

6.1: The universe has observable properties and structure

6.1.A: The Earth, Sun, and Moon are part of a larger system that includes other planets and smaller celestial bodies

6.1.A.a: Classify celestial bodies in the solar system into categories: Sun, Moon, planets, and other small bodies (i.e., asteroids, comets, meteors), based on physical properties

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Solar System Explorer

6.1.A.b: Compare and contrast the size, composition, atmosphere, and surface of the planets (inner vs. outer) in our solar system and Earth's moon

 Solar System Explorer

6.1.A.c: Describe the relative proximity of common celestial bodies (i.e., Sun, Moon, planets, smaller celestial bodies such as comets and meteors, other stars) in the sky to the Earth

 Solar System Explorer

6.1.B: The Earth has a composition and location suitable to sustain life

6.1.B.a: Describe how the Earth's placement in the solar system is favorable to sustain life (i.e., distance from the Sun, temperature, atmosphere)

 Solar System Explorer

6.1.B.b: Compare and contrast the characteristics of Earth that support life with the characteristics of other planets that are considered favorable or unfavorable to life (e.g., atmospheric gases, extremely high/low temperatures

 Solar System Explorer

6.1.C: Most of the information we know about the universe comes from the electromagnetic spectrum

6.1.C.a: Explain that stars are separated from one another by vast and different distances, which causes stars to appear smaller than the Sun

 H-R Diagram

6.2: Regular and predictable motions of objects in the universe can be described and explained as the result of gravitational forces

6.2.A: The apparent position of the Sun and other stars, as seen from Earth, change in observable patterns

6.2.A.a: Relate the apparent east-to-west changes in the positions of the Sun, other stars, and planets in the sky over the course of a day to Earth's counterclockwise rotation about its axis

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Seasons in 3D
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

6.2.A.b: Describe the pattern that can be observed in the changes in number of hours of visible sunlight, and the time and location of sunrise and sunset, throughout the year

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

6.2.A.c: Describe how, in the Northern Hemisphere, the Sun appears lower in the sky during the winter and higher in the sky during the summer

 Seasons in 3D
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

6.2.A.d: Describe how, in winter, the Sun appears to rise in the Southeast and set in the Southwest, accounting for a relatively short day length, and, in summer, the Sun appears to rise in the Northeast and set in the Northwest, accounting for a relatively long day length

 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

6.2.A.e: Describe how the Sun is never directly overhead when observed from North America

 Seasons in 3D
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

6.2.B: The apparent position of the Moon, as seen from Earth, and its actual position relative to Earth change in observable patterns

6.2.B.a: Observe the change in time and location of Moon rise, Moon set, and the Moon's appearance relative to time of day and month over several months, and note the pattern in this change

 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases
 Phases of the Moon

6.2.B.b: Describe how the Moon rises later each day due to its revolution around the Earth in a counterclockwise direction

 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases

6.2.B.c: Describe how the Moon is in the sky for roughly 12 hours in a 24-hour period (i.e., if the Moon rises at about 6 P.M., it will set at about 6 A.M.)

 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases

6.2.B.e: Relate the apparent change in the Moon's position in the sky as it appears to move east-to-west over the course of a day to Earth's counterclockwise rotation about its axis

 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

6.2.B.f: Describe how the appearance of the Moon that can be seen from Earth changes approximately every 28 days in an observable pattern (moon phases)

 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases
 Phases of the Moon

6.2.C: The regular and predictable motions of a planet and moon relative to the Sun explain natural phenomena on a planet, such as day, month, year, shadows, moon phases, eclipses, tides, and seasons

6.2.C.a: Illustrate and explain a day as the time it takes a planet to make a full rotation about its axis

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

6.2.C.b: Diagram the path (orbital ellipse) the Earth travels as it revolves around the Sun

 Gravity Pitch

6.2.C.c: Illustrate and explain a year as the time it takes a planet to revolve around the Sun

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Solar System Explorer

6.2.C.d: Explain the relationships between a planet's length of year (period of revolution) and its position in the solar system

 Solar System Explorer

6.2.C.e: Recognize and explain the phases of the moon are due to the relative positions of the Moon with respect to the Earth and Sun

 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases
 Phases of the Moon

6.2.C.f: Relate the axial tilt and orbital position of the Earth as it revolves around the Sun to the intensity of sunlight falling on different parts of the Earth during different seasons

 Seasons in 3D
 Seasons: Why do we have them?
 Summer and Winter

6.2.D: Gravity is a force of attraction between objects in the solar system that governs their motion

6.2.D.a: Describe how the Earth's gravity pulls any object on or near the Earth toward it (including natural and artificial satellites)

 Gravity Pitch

6.2.D.b: Describe how the planets' gravitational pull keeps satellites and moons in orbit around them

 Gravity Pitch

6.2.D.c: Describe how the Sun's gravitational pull holds the Earth and other planets in their orbits

 Gravity Pitch

Correlation last revised: 4/4/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.