1: Interactions Within Ecosystems

1.1: Ecosystems

1.1.1: identify questions related to a local ecosystem such as “What types of organisms live in a particular ecosystem?”

1.1.1.a: describe an ecosystem as a group of interacting living and nonliving things

Pond Ecosystem

1.1.1.b: identify examples of ecosystems within Newfoundland and Labrador, including:

1.1.1.b.i: coastline and ocean

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.1.1.b.ii: freshwater

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem

1.1.1.b.iv: forest

Forest Ecosystem

1.2: Components of an Ecosystem

1.2.1: demonstrate the importance of choosing words that are scientifically appropriate

1.2.1.a: define and use terms in context, including:

1.2.1.a.i: ecosystem

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.2.1.a.ii: abiotic

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.2.1.a.vi: population

Food Chain

1.2.1.a.vii: community

Food Chain

1.2.1.a.ix: niche

Forest Ecosystem

1.2.2: investigate the biotic and abiotic factors of a local ecosystem

1.2.2.a: define range of tolerance

Natural Selection
Rainfall and Bird Beaks - Metric

1.2.2.b: describe the following abiotic factors of local ecosystems

1.2.2.b.i: intensity of sunlight

Pond Ecosystem

1.2.2.b.ii: air, soil and water temperature

Pond Ecosystem

1.2.2.h: use a key to identify the biotic factors observed in the local ecosystem

Pond Ecosystem

1.3: Interactions Within an Ecosystem

1.3.1: describe interactions between biotic and abiotic factors in an ecosystem, including:

1.3.1.i: biotic-abiotic

Pond Ecosystem

1.3.1.ii: abiotic-abiotic

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem

1.3.1.iii: biotic-biotic

Food Chain
Pond Ecosystem

1.3.2: investigate an interaction between a biotic and an abiotic factor in an ecosystem

Pond Ecosystem

1.3.4: organize, compile and display data using tables

Food Chain

1.3.6: identify the niche of producers, consumers, and decomposers in a local ecosystem

1.3.6.a: define and use in context the terms producer, consumer, and decomposer

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem

1.3.6.b: define herbivores, carnivores and omnivores in terms of different types of consumers

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem
Prairie Ecosystem

1.3.7: given a diverse group of organisms, classify them as producers, consumers, or decomposers

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem

1.4: Energy Flow in an Ecosystem

1.4.1: describe how energy is supplied to, and how it flows through, a food chain

1.4.1.a: recognize that producers use light energy, carbon dioxide, and water (photosynthesis) to produce energy for the ecosystem

Cell Energy Cycle
Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem
Photosynthesis Lab

1.4.1.b: define food chain

Food Chain
Prairie Ecosystem

1.4.1.d: classify the organisms within food chains as producers, herbivores, and carnivores

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem
Prairie Ecosystem

1.4.2: apply the concept of a food web as a tool for interpreting the structure and interactions of an ecosystem

1.4.2.a: define food web

Forest Ecosystem

1.4.3: describe how energy flows through a food chain and food web

1.4.3.a: recognize that energy flows through food chains and food webs from producers to herbivores to carnivores/ omnivores as well as to decomposers

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem
Prairie Ecosystem

1.6: Environmental Action

1.6.1: defend a course of action to protect the local habitat of a particular organism

1.6.1.a: recognize that humans have influenced the natural environment Including:

1.6.1.a.i: habitat loss/ destruction

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem

1.6.1.a.ii: harvesting resources

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem

1.6.1.a.iii: pollution

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem
Water Pollution

1.6.1.a.iv: introduced species

Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

1.6.1.b: discuss the pros and cons of habitat conservation

1.6.1.b.a: Pros

1.6.1.b.a.ii: preservation of biodiversity

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.6.2: recognize that a variety of groups and individuals are interested in protecting the environment

Water Pollution

2: Heat

2.1: Describing Temperature

2.1.1: relate personal activities in formal and informal settings to temperature

2.1.1.b: relate temperature to everyday experiences, including:

2.1.1.b.i: daily temperature changes

Coastal Winds and Clouds - Metric

2.1.1.b.iv: average temperatures in different geographic areas

Coastal Winds and Clouds - Metric

2.2: Measuring Temperature

2.2.2: identify scales used in temperature measurement, including:

2.2.2.iii: Kelvin

Temperature and Particle Motion

2.3: Temperature and Matter

2.3.1: define temperature using the particle theory of matter

2.3.1.b: describe the particle theory of matter, including:

2.3.1.b.ii: these particles are always moving - they have energy and the more energy the particles have, the faster they move

Temperature and Particle Motion

2.3.3: explain changes of state using the particle theory of matter, including:

2.3.3.i: melting

Phases of Water

2.3.3.ii: freezing

Phases of Water

2.3.3.iii: evaporation

Phases of Water

2.3.4: state a hypothesis, carry out an experiment, identify and control major variables and state a conclusion based on experimental data

Seed Germination
Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

2.3.5: use heating and measuring tools accurately and safely

Triple Beam Balance

2.4: Heat Transfer

2.4.1: compare transmission of heat by conduction, convection, and radiation

2.4.1.b: list common examples of the three processes of heat transfer, including:

2.4.1.b.ii: convection - air currents, heating a liquid

Coastal Winds and Clouds - Metric
Conduction and Convection

2.4.1.b.iii: radiation - fireplace, sunlight

Heat Absorption
Herschel Experiment - Metric
Radiation

2.4.2: design and conduct an experiment to test identified questions, state a hypothesis, identify and control major variables

Radiation

2.4.5: state a conclusion, based on experimental data, and explain how evidence gathered supports or refutes an initial idea

Heat Absorption
Radiation

2.4.6: describe how various surfaces absorb radiant heat

Color Absorption
Heat Absorption
Radiation

2.6: Heat Transfer - Conductors and Insulators

2.6.1: provide examples of insulating technologies used today and in the past, including:

2.6.1.ii: sod

Heat Transfer by Conduction

2.6.1.iii: fibreglass

Heat Transfer by Conduction

2.6.1.iv: thermos

Heat Transfer by Conduction

2.7: Temperature Versus Heat - Specific Heat Capacity

2.7.1: compare, in qualitative terms, the specific heat capacities of some common materials

2.7.1.b: define specific heat capacity

Energy Conversion in a System

2.7.1.c: compare the specific heat capacity of the following substances:

2.7.1.c.iv: steel

Heat Absorption

2.7.1.c.v: wood

Heat Absorption

3: Mixtures and Solutions

3.1: Mixtures and Pure Substances - The Particle Theory

3.1.1: distinguish between pure substances and mixtures using the particle theory of matter

3.1.1.a: define particle theory of matter

Element Builder

4: Earth’s Crust

4.1: Rocks and Minerals

4.1.1: classify minerals based on their physical properties

4.1.1.b: list and describe properties of minerals, including:

4.1.1.b.i: colour

Heat Absorption
Mineral Identification
Radiation

4.1.1.b.ii: streak

Mineral Identification

4.1.1.b.iii: lustre

Mineral Identification

4.1.1.b.iv: hardness

Mineral Identification

4.1.3: select appropriate methods and tools for collecting and organizing data to identify minerals

Mineral Identification

4.1.5: classify rocks based on their characteristics and method of formation

4.1.5.b: define igneous rock and describe their formation

Rock Cycle

4.1.5.e: define sedimentary rocks and describe their formation

Rock Cycle

4.2: Rock Cycle

4.2.1: identify questions to investigate arising from the study of the rock cycle

4.2.1.a: sketch and label a diagram of the rock cycle

Rock Cycle

4.2.1.b: recognize the relationship between various types of rocks (igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic)

Rock Cycle

4.3: Structure of the Earth

4.3.1: describe the characteristics of Earth’s crust and some of the technologies which have allowed scientists to study geological features in and on the Earth’s crust

4.3.1.c: recognize that Earth’s crust is broken into plates and movement occurs where plate margins meet (plate tectonics)

Plate Tectonics

4.4: Plate Tectonics Theory

4.4.1: describe how plate tectonic theory has evolved in light of new geological evidence

4.4.1.a: identify Alfred Wegener as the person responsible for proposing the continental drift theory

Building Pangaea

4.4.1.b: describe the continental drift theory and the evidence supporting it, including evidence from:

4.4.1.b.i: continental fit (paleogeographic)

Building Pangaea

4.4.1.b.ii: fossils (biological)

Building Pangaea

4.4.1.b.iii: rock layers (geological)

Building Pangaea

4.4.1.d: identify types of plate boundaries, including:

4.4.1.d.i: divergent (pulling apart)

Plate Tectonics

4.4.1.d.ii: convergent (pushing together)

Plate Tectonics

4.4.1.d.iii: transform (sliding past)

Plate Tectonics

4.5: Earthquakes, Volcanos and Mountains

4.5.1: examine some of the catastrophic events that occur on or near Earth’s surface, including:

4.5.1.i: earthquakes

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station
Plate Tectonics

4.5.1.ii: volcanic eruptions

Plate Tectonics

4.5.1.1.1: define earthquake

Plate Tectonics

4.5.1.2.1: explain why earthquakes occur using the concept of plate tectonics

Plate Tectonics

4.5.1.3.1: define volcano

Plate Tectonics

4.5.1.4.1: identify how and where volcanoes form. Include

4.5.1.4.1.i: areas where plates converge

Plate Tectonics

4.5.1.4.1.ii: areas where plates diverge

Plate Tectonics

4.5.1.4.1.iii: areas where plates are thin (hot spots)

Plate Tectonics

4.5.3: provide examples of theories used in the past to explain volcanic activity, earthquakes, and mountain building

4.5.3.a: identify explanations of volcanic and earthquake activity from the past, including:

4.5.3.a.i: Pele

Plate Tectonics

4.5.3.a.ii: Glooscap

Plate Tectonics

4.5.4: explain the processes of mountain formation

4.5.4.a: define folding and faulting

Plate Tectonics

4.5.4.b: explain how mountains are formed using the theory of plate tectonics, including:

4.5.4.b.i: folding

Plate Tectonics

4.5.4.b.ii: faulting

Plate Tectonics

4.5.4.b.iii: volcanic eruption

Plate Tectonics

4.8: Soil

4.8.3: relate porosity and permeability to soil types

Porosity

4.8.4: carry out procedures controlling the major variables to answer questions arising from practical issues

Growing Plants

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.