A: Applications of Matter and Chemical Change

1.1: Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

A.2: Investigate and classify chemical reactions

A.2.1: name simple compounds from chemical formulas, and recognize the chemical names of substances that are used every day

Chemical Equations

A.2.2: infer the relationship among chemical formulas, composition and name (e.g., simple acids, bases, salts)

Chemical Equations

A.2.3: investigate evidence of chemical change; i.e., change of phase, appearance, colour, odour, energy (e.g., heat, light)

Chemical Changes

A.2.4: investigate, describe and compare the changes to reactants and products in fossil fuel combustion and rusting reactions

Chemical Equations

A.2.5: define, operationally, endothermic and exothermic reactions (e.g., mixing chemicals in a “cold pack,” burning natural gas)

Chemical Changes

A.2.6: investigate and describe simple composition and decomposition reactions (e.g., tarnishing of silver, electrolysis of water)

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

A.2.7: describe, using observation, the chemical properties of reactants and products in chemical reactions (e.g., neutralization, combustion, simple composition, decomposition)

Equilibrium and Concentration

A.2.8: identify simple composition, decomposition, combustion and neutralization reactions when given word and/or chemical equations, products and reactants

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

A.3: Explain the law of conservation of mass when balancing chemical reactions

A.3.1: relate the concept of the atom to the conservation of mass; i.e., the number of atoms stays the same as they are rearranged in a chemical reaction; therefore, the total mass before and after the reaction remains the same (e.g., analyze the chemical equation 2Mg(s) + O2(g)→ 2MgO(s) to illustrate the law of conservation of mass by counting the number of atoms of each element)

Chemical Changes
Chemical Equations

A.3.2: represent simple chemical reactions (e.g., neutralization, combustion, simple composition, decomposition) using word and/or balanced chemical equations

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

A.4: Analyze common technological products and processes encountered in everyday life and careers, and analyze their potential effects on the environment

A.4.1: analyze and explain common acid–base neutralization reactions (e.g., neutralization of stomach acid by antacids, use of baking soda or baking powder, use of lemon juice on fish dishes)

Titration

1.2: Skill Outcomes

A.IP: Initiating and Planning

A.IP.1: Ask questions about relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

A.IP.1.1: identify questions to investigate that arise from practical problems and issues (e.g., “What environmental factors affect rusting the most?”)

Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A.PR: Performing and Recording

A.PR.1: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

A.PR.1.1: carry out procedures, controlling the major variables, and adapt or extend those procedures where required (e.g., investigate chemical reactions for evidence of chemical change)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

A.PR.1.5: construct and test a prototype of a device or system, and troubleshoot problems as they arise

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

A.AI: Analyzing and Interpreting

A.AI.1: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

A.AI.1.1: compile and display evidence and information, by hand or computer, in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, graphs and scatterplots (e.g., report findings of investigations of chemical change)

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

A.AI.1.3: state a conclusion, based on experimental data, and explain how evidence gathered supports or refutes an initial idea (e.g., report on the results of an investigation into the effectiveness of antacid tablets)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

A.AI.1.6: identify and evaluate potential applications of findings (e.g., identify ways to control corrosion of oil pipelines and equipment used in pulp and paper mills)

Pendulum Clock

A.CT: Communication and Teamwork

A.CT.1: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

A.CT.1.4: evaluate individual and group processes used in planning, problem solving, decision making and completing a task (e.g., assess processes used to construct a device that reduces CO emissions)

Pendulum Clock

B: Understanding Common Energy Conversion Systems

2.1: Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

B.1: Investigate and interpret transformation and conservation of various forms of energy in physical and technological systems

B.1.1: investigate and describe evidence of energy transformations in the home and everyday contexts (e.g., simple machines, electrical devices, chemical reactions)

Energy Conversion in a System
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

B.1.3: describe an energy transformation system in terms of input, converter and output (e.g., an electric kettle)

Energy Conversion in a System

B.1.4: apply the law of conservation of energy to trace energy transformation, dissipation and availability in physical and technological systems (e.g., swinging pendulum)

Air Track
Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Roller Coaster Physics

B.2: Investigate and analyze electrical energy conversion devices in terms of energy conversions, rate of energy transfer and efficiency

B.2.4: explain why the useful output energy in machines is always less than the input energy

Pulley Lab

B.3: Investigate and describe the energy conversions associated with change in chemical and biological systems

B.3.1: investigate and describe common chemical reactions that produce or absorb energy (e.g., light and heat given off by the combustion of fossil fuels, cold and hot packs)

Chemical Changes

B.3.2: list and explain the requirements of photosynthesis as carbon dioxide, water, chlorophyll in chloroplasts and sunlight; and list and explain the products as oxygen and glucose

Cell Energy Cycle
Photosynthesis

B.3.3: explain, in general, the process of respiration in which glucose and oxygen are converted to energy, carbon dioxide and water

Cell Energy Cycle

B.3.7: outline, in general terms, the formation of the following fossil fuels: oil, coal and natural gas

Carbon Cycle

2.2: Skill Outcomes

B.IP: Initiating and Planning

B.IP.1: Ask questions about relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

B.IP.1.1: identify questions to investigate that arise from practical problems and issues (e.g., “How can we measure the power of the human body?”)

Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

B.PR: Performing and Recording

B.PR.1: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

B.PR.1.1: carry out procedures, controlling the major variables and adapting or extending procedures where required (e.g., determine the amount of thermal energy released by cellular respiration; determine the energy outputs of various foods, using simple calorimetric methods)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

B.PR.1.5: construct and test a prototype of a device or system, and troubleshoot problems as they arise (e.g., construct a device that uses solar or wind energy to generate electricity)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

B.AI: Analyzing and Interpreting

B.AI.1: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

B.AI.1.1: compile and display evidence and information, by hand or computer, in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, graphs and scatterplots (e.g., report findings from an experiment to measure the power of the human body)

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

B.AI.1.2: compare theoretical and empirical values, and account for discrepancies (e.g., explain the difference between the theoretical value of percent efficiency of a device and the measured efficiency in the laboratory)

Limiting Reactants

C: Disease Defence and Human Health

3.1: Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

C.2: Analyze the relationship between human health and environmental pathogens

C.2.2: investigate and describe the conditions necessary for the growth of a specific pathogen (e.g., viruses, fungi, bacteria)

Virus Lytic Cycle

C.4: Describe the role of genes in inherited characteristics and human health

C.4.1: describe the role of genes in inherited characteristics (e.g., hitchhiker’s thumb; earlobe attachment; hair, skin and eye colour)

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

C.4.3: identify the role of chromosomes in determining the sex of human offspring

Human Karyotyping

C.4.5: identify the relationships among DNA, genes and chromosomes; and identify, in general, the structure and replication of a DNA molecule

Human Karyotyping

3.2: Skill Outcomes

C.IP: Initiating and Planning

C.IP.1: Ask questions about relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

C.IP.1.1: identify questions to investigate that arise from practical problems and issues (e.g., “How effective are commercially available antibacterial cleaners on bacteria found in the home or in school?”)

Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

C.PR: Performing and Recording

C.PR.1: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

C.PR.1.2: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data (e.g., observe prepared slides of various disease-causing microbial organisms or prepared slides of cellular components of human blood)

Triple Beam Balance

C.AI: Analyzing and Interpreting

C.AI.1: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

C.AI.1.1: compile and display evidence and information, by hand or computer, in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, graphs and scatterplots (e.g., graph the incidence of a particular disease over time)

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

C.AI.1.5: identify and evaluate potential applications of findings (e.g., assess factors that promote or discourage growth in bacteria populations; identify mutagens in the environment and trace their sources)

Pendulum Clock

C.CT: Communication and Teamwork

C.CT.1: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

C.CT.1.6: evaluate individual and group processes used in planning, problem solving, decision making and completing a task (e.g., assess processes used to determine if the introduction of human genes into other species, such as mice and bacteria, poses a risk to human health)

Pendulum Clock

D: Motion, Change and Transportation Safety

4.1: Outcomes for Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

D.2: Describe the change in position and speed of objects mathematically and graphically

D.2.1: define speed (velocity) as change in position during a time interval, and quantify speed (velocity) using v = d/t (e.g., express speed [velocity] in metres per second [m/s])

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

D.2.2: plot a distance versus time graph, and use the slope of the graph to determine the speed (velocity) of an object

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

D.3: Apply concepts of force, mass and the law of conservation of momentum to investigate one-dimensional collisions of two objects

D.3.2: explain why it takes a large heavy object, such as a train, a great distance to come to a stop

2D Collisions
Air Track

D.3.3: define impulse as a change in momentum, and calculate impulse as the product of force and the time interval over which it acts: mΔv = FΔt

2D Collisions
Air Track

D.3.5: illustrate, quantitatively, the conservation of momentum as the following: the total momentum of two objects before a collision is the same as after the collision when friction is minimal and the two objects lock together

2D Collisions
Air Track

D.4: Apply the principles underlying the motion of objects to explain the need for safety devices and practices

D.4.5: describe the application of the law of conservation of momentum in a variety of situations involving two objects (e.g., rear-end collision, recoil, jumping from a boat, traffic accidents, two people on skates pushing each other)

2D Collisions
Air Track

4.2: Skill Outcomes

D.IP: Initiating and Planning

D.IP.1: Ask questions about relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

D.IP.1.1: identify questions that arise from practical problems and issues (e.g., “How long does it take to respond to an emergency?”)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

D.IP.1.2: define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation (e.g., determine reaction time)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

D.IP.1.3: design an experiment, identifying the manipulated, responding and fixed variables (e.g., investigate how air bags work, using a partially inflated beach ball or plastic bag and a steel ball or rock to model the functioning of the air bag)

Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

D.PR: Performing and Recording

D.PR.1: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

D.PR.1.1: carry out procedures, controlling the major variables and adapting or extending procedures where required (e.g., test different materials for use as seat belts)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

D.PR.1.2: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data (e.g., develop a questionnaire to elicit community opinions about wearing seat belts)

Triple Beam Balance

D.PR.1.3: estimate quantities (e.g., estimate, predict, check and validate calculations)

Estimating Population Size

D.PR.1.4: compile and organize data, using appropriate formats and data treatments to facilitate interpretation

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

D.AI: Analyzing and Interpreting

D.AI.1: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

D.AI.1.2: compile and display evidence and information, by hand or computer, in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, graphs and scatterplots (e.g., draw a force–time graph for cushioned and noncushioned toy cars, in an investigation of the effectiveness of different types of cushions for a toy car)

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

D.AI.1.4: interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer or calculate linear or nonlinear relationships among variables (e.g., determine speed [velocity] from a distance–time graph, or distance from a speed [velocity]–time graph)

Pendulum Clock

D.AI.1.5: identify and apply criteria; i.e., social factors, explanations, methods, data, related research and relevance, including the presence of bias, for evaluating evidence and sources of information (e.g., identify and analyze a variety of factors that affect the authenticity of information derived from the mass media and electronic communication)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Seed Germination

D.CT: Communication and Teamwork

D.CT.1: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

D.CT.1.3: evaluate individual or group processes used in planning, problem solving, decision making and completing a task (e.g., assess group processes used to evaluate cars for their safety features)

Pendulum Clock

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.