1: Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

1: Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

 Charge Launcher
 Force and Fan Carts

2: Investigate, measure, and communicate in a graphical format how an observed pattern of motion (e.g., a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, two children teetering on a see-saw, a model vehicle rolling down a ramp of varying heights, a pendulum swinging) can be used to predict the future motion of an object.

 Distance-Time Graphs
 Force and Fan Carts
 Measuring Motion
 Pendulum Clock

3: Explore objects that can be manipulated in order to determine cause-and-effect relationships (e.g., distance between objects affecting strength of a force, orientation of magnets affecting direction of a magnetic force) of electric interactions between two objects not in contact with one another (e.g., force on hair from an electrically charged balloon, electrical forces between a charged rod and pieces of paper) or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with one another (e.g., force between two permanent magnets or between an electromagnet and steel paperclips, force exerted by one magnet versus the force exerted by two magnets).

 Charge Launcher
 Magnetism

2: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

6: Create representations to explain the unique and diverse life cycles of organisms other than humans (e.g., flowering plants, frogs, butterflies), including commonalities such as birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

 Flower Pollination

3: Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits

7: Examine data to provide evidence that plants and animals, excluding humans, have traits inherited from parents and that variations of these traits exist in groups of similar organisms (e.g., flower colors in pea plants, fur color and pattern in animal offspring).

 Inheritance
 Natural Selection

8: Engage in argument from evidence to justify that traits can be influenced by the environment (e.g., stunted growth in normally tall plants due to insufficient water, change in an arctic fox’s fur color due to light and/or temperature, stunted growth of a normally large animal due to malnourishment).

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Growing Plants
 Inheritance
 Measuring Trees
 Natural Selection

4: Unity and Diversity

9: Analyze and interpret data from fossils (e.g., type, size, distribution) to provide evidence of organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago (e.g., marine fossils on dry land, tropical plant fossils in arctic areas, fossils of extinct organisms in any environment).

 Building Pangaea

10: Investigate how variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing (e.g., plants having larger thorns being less likely to be eaten by predators, animals having better camouflage coloration being more likely to survive and bear offspring).

 Natural Selection

11: Construct an argument from evidence to explain the likelihood of an organism’s ability to survive when compared to the resources in a certain habitat (e.g., freshwater organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in saltwater; desert organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in woodlands).

 Natural Selection
 Pond Ecosystem

11.b: Create models that illustrate how organisms and their habitats make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

 Pond Ecosystem

Correlation last revised: 1/19/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.