A: Scientific Investigation Skills and Career Exploration

A1: demonstrate scientific investigation skills (related to both inquiry and research) in the four areas of skills (initiating and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting, and communicating);

A1.1: formulate relevant scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research

Diffusion
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A1.5: conduct inquiries, controlling relevant variables, adapting or extending procedures as required, and using appropriate materials and equipment safely, accurately, and effectively, to collect observations and data

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

A1.6: compile accurate data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data, using appropriate formats, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams

Pendulum Clock

A1.10: draw conclusions based on inquiry results and research findings, and justify their conclusions with reference to scientific knowledge

Pendulum Clock

A1.13: express the results of any calculations involving data accurately and precisely, to the appropriate number of decimal places or significant figures

Unit Conversions 2 - Scientific Notation and Significant Digits

B: Motion and Its Applications

B2: investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, the linear uniform and non-uniform motion of objects, and solve related problems;

B2.1: use appropriate terminology related to motion, including, but not limited to: distance, displacement, position, speed, acceleration, instantaneous, force, and net force

Atwood Machine
Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

B2.2: plan and conduct investigations to measure distance and speed for objects moving in one dimension in uniform motion

Free-Fall Laboratory

B2.3: plan and conduct investigations to measure constant acceleration for objects moving in one dimension

Atwood Machine
Free-Fall Laboratory
Shoot the Monkey

B2.4: draw distance–time graphs, and use the graphs to calculate average speed and instantaneous speed of objects moving in one dimension

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

B2.5: draw speed–time graphs, and use the graphs to calculate average acceleration and distance of objects moving in one dimension

Free-Fall Laboratory

B2.6: solve simple problems involving one-dimensional average speed (vav), distance (“Delta”d), and elapsed time (“Delta”t), using the algebraic equation vav = “Delta”d/“Delta”t

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

B2.7: solve simple problems involving one-dimensional average acceleration (aav), change in speed (“Delta”v), and elapsed time (“Delta”t) using the algebraic equation aav = “Delta”v/“Delta”t

Free-Fall Laboratory

B2.8: plan and conduct an inquiry to determine the relationship between the net force acting on an object and its acceleration in one dimension

Atwood Machine
Free-Fall Laboratory

B2.9: analyse, in quantitative terms, the forces acting on an object, and use free-body diagrams to determine net force and acceleration of the object in one dimension

Atwood Machine
Inclined Plane - Simple Machine

B2.10: conduct an inquiry to measure gravitational acceleration, and calculate the percentage error of the experimental value

Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range

B3: demonstrate an understanding of different kinds of motion and the relationships between speed, acceleration, displacement, and distance.

B3.1: distinguish between constant, instantaneous, and average speed, and give examples of each involving uniform and non-uniform motion

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

B3.2: describe the relationship between one-dimensional average speed (vav), distance (“Delta”d), and elapsed time (“Delta”t)

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

B3.3: describe, in quantitative terms, the relationship between one-dimensional average acceleration (aav), change in speed (“Delta”v), and elapsed time (“Delta”t)

Free-Fall Laboratory

B3.4: state Newton’s laws, and apply them qualitatively and quantitatively to explain the motion of an object in one dimension

Atwood Machine
Fan Cart Physics
Free-Fall Laboratory

B3.5: explain the relationship between the acceleration of an object and the net unbalanced force acting on that object

Atwood Machine
Free-Fall Laboratory
Inclined Plane - Simple Machine

C: Mechanical Systems

C2: investigate forces, torque, work, coefficients of friction, simple machines, and mechanical advantage, and interpret related data;

C2.1: use appropriate terminology related to mechanical systems, including, but not limited to: coefficients of friction, torque, mechanical advantage, work input, and work output

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Pulley Lab
Torque and Moment of Inertia

C2.2: analyse, in qualitative and quantitative terms, the forces (e.g., gravitational, frictional, and normal forces; tension) acting on an object in one dimension, and describe the resulting motion of the object

Fan Cart Physics
Free-Fall Laboratory
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

C2.3: use an inquiry process to determine the factors affecting static and kinetic friction, and to determine the corresponding coefficient of friction between an everyday object and the surface with which it is in contact

Free-Fall Laboratory
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

C2.4: use an inquiry process to determine the relationships between force, distance, and torque for the load arm and effort arm of levers

Torque and Moment of Inertia

C2.5: solve problems involving torque, force, load-arm length, and effort-arm length as they relate to the three classes of levers

Torque and Moment of Inertia

C2.6: investigate, in quantitative terms, common machines (e.g., a bicycle, a can opener, a piano) with respect to input and output forces and mechanical advantage

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pulley Lab

C2.7: construct a simple or compound machine, and determine its mechanical advantage (e.g., a pulley, a mobile, a can crusher, a trebuchet)

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pulley Lab

C3: demonstrate an understanding of concepts related to forces and mechanical advantage in relation to mechanical systems.

C3.1: identify and describe, in quantitative and qualitative terms, applications of various types of simple machines (e.g., wedges, screws, levers, pulleys, gears, wheels and axles)

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pulley Lab

C3.3: explain, with reference to force and displacement, the conditions necessary for work to be done

Pulley Lab

C3.4: explain the concept of mechanical advantage

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pulley Lab

D: Electricity and Magnetism

D2: investigate real and simulated mixed direct current circuits and the nature of magnetism and electromagnetism, and analyse related data;

D2.1: use appropriate terminology related to electricity and magnetism, including, but not limited to: direct current, alternating current, electrical potential difference, resistance, power, energy, permanent magnet, electromagnet, magnetic field, motor principle, and electric motor

Electromagnetic Induction
Magnetic Induction

D2.2: construct real and simulated mixed direct current (DC) circuits (i.e., parallel, series, and mixed circuits), and analyse them in quantitative terms to test Kirchhoff’s laws

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

D2.3: analyse, in quantitative terms, real or simulated DC circuits and circuit diagrams, using Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff’s laws

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

D3: demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of electricity and magnetism.

D3.1: compare and contrast the behaviour and functions of series, parallel, and mixed DC circuits

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

D3.2: state Kirchhoff’s laws and Ohm’s law, and use them to explain, in quantitative terms, direct current, potential difference, and resistance in mixed circuit diagrams

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

D3.3: identify and explain safety precautions related to electrical circuits in the school, home, and workplace (e.g., the importance of turning off the current before performing electrical repairs; the reasons for grounding circuits; how to safely replace spent fuses; the use of double insulated tools and appliance circuit breakers)

Advanced Circuits

D3.7: state Oersted’s principle, and apply the right-hand rule to explain the direction of the magnetic field produced when electric current flows through a long, straight conductor and through a solenoid

Magnetic Induction

E: Energy Transformations

E2: investigate energy transformations and the law of conservation of energy, and solve related problems;

E2.1: use appropriate terminology related to energy and energy transformations, including, but not limited to: work, gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, chemical energy, energy transformations, and efficiency

Air Track
Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Potential Energy on Shelves
Pulley Lab

E2.2: use the law of conservation of energy to solve problems involving gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, and thermal energy

Air Track
Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

E2.3: construct a simple device that makes use of energy transformations (e.g., a pendulum, a roller coaster), and use it to investigate transformations between gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy

Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

E2.4: design and construct a complex device that integrates energy transformations (e.g., a mousetrap vehicle, an “egg-drop” container, a wind turbine), and analyse its operation in qualitative and quantitative terms

Energy Conversion in a System

E2.5: investigate a simple energy transformation (e.g., the use of an elastic band to propel a miniature car), explain the power and output, and calculate the energy

Energy Conversion in a System
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

E3: demonstrate an understanding of diverse forms of energy, energy transformations, and efficiency.

E3.1: describe and compare various types of energy and energy transformations (e.g., transformations related to kinetic, sound, electric, chemical, potential, mechanical, nuclear, and thermal energy)

Air Track
Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

E3.2: explain the energy transformations in a system (e.g., a toy, an amusement park ride, a skydiver suspended from a parachute), using principles related to kinetic energy, gravitational potential energy, conservation of energy, and efficiency

Air Track
Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.