A: Scientific Investigation Skills and Career Exploration

A1: demonstrate scientific investigation skills (related to both inquiry and research) in the four areas of skills (initiating and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting, and communicating);

A1.1: formulate relevant scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research

Diffusion
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A1.5: conduct inquiries, controlling relevant variables, adapting or extending procedures as required, and using appropriate materials and equipment safely, accurately, and effectively, to collect observations and data

Diffusion

A1.6: compile accurate data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data, using appropriate formats, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams

Boyle's Law and Charles' Law

A1.8: synthesize, analyse, interpret, and evaluate qualitative and quantitative data; solve problems involving quantitative data; determine whether the evidence supports or refutes the initial prediction or hypothesis and whether it is consistent with scientific theory; identify sources of bias and error; and suggest improvements to the inquiry to reduce the likelihood of error

Boyle's Law and Charles' Law

A1.10: draw conclusions based on inquiry results and research findings, and justify their conclusions with reference to scientific knowledge

Diffusion

A1.13: express the results of any calculations involving data accurately and precisely, to the appropriate number of decimal places or significant figures

Unit Conversions 2 - Scientific Notation and Significant Digits

B: Matter, Chemical Trends, and Chemical Bonding

B2: investigate physical and chemical properties of elements and compounds, and use various methods to visually represent them;

B2.1: use appropriate terminology related to chemical trends and chemical bonding, including, but not limited to: atomic radius, effective nuclear charge, electronegativity, ionization energy, and electron affinity

Electron Configuration

B2.2: analyse data related to the properties of elements within a period (e.g., ionization energy, atomic radius) to identify general trends in the periodic table

Electron Configuration

B2.4: draw Lewis structures to represent the bonds in ionic and molecular compounds

Covalent Bonds
Ionic Bonds

B2.7: write chemical formulae of binary and polyatomic compounds, including those with multiple valences, and name the compounds using the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) nomenclature system

Chemical Equations

B3: demonstrate an understanding of periodic trends in the periodic table and how elements combine to form chemical bonds.

B3.3: state the periodic law, and explain how patterns in the electron arrangement and forces in atoms result in periodic trends (e.g., in atomic radius, ionization energy, electron affinity, electronegativity) in the periodic table

Electron Configuration

B3.4: explain the differences between the formation of ionic bonds and the formation of covalent bonds

Covalent Bonds
Ionic Bonds

C: Chemical Reactions

C2: investigate different types of chemical reactions;

C2.1: use appropriate terminology related to chemical reactions, including, but not limited to: neutralization, precipitate, acidic, and basic

Titration

C2.2: write balanced chemical equations to represent synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, double displacement, and combustion reactions, using the IUPAC nomenclature system

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

C2.3: investigate synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, and double displacement reactions, by testing the products of each reaction (e.g., test for products such as gases, the presence of an acid, or the presence of a base)

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations
Dehydration Synthesis

C2.4: predict the products of different types of synthesis and decomposition reactions (e.g., synthesis reactions in which simple compounds are formed; synthesis reactions of metallic or non-metallic oxides with water; decomposition reactions, in which a chemical compound is separated into several compounds)

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations
Dehydration Synthesis

C2.6: predict the products of double displacement reactions (e.g., the formation of precipitates or gases; neutralization)

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

C2.9: investigate neutralization reactions (e.g., neutralize a dilute solution of sodium hydroxide with a dilute solution of hydrochloric acid, and isolate the sodium chloride produced)

Titration

C3: demonstrate an understanding of the different types of chemical reactions.

C3.1: identify various types of chemical reactions, including synthesis, decomposition, single displacement, double displacement, and combustion

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations
Dehydration Synthesis
Equilibrium and Concentration

C3.2: explain the difference between a complete combustion reaction and an incomplete combustion reaction (e.g., complete and incomplete combustion of hydrocarbon fuels)

Chemical Equations
Equilibrium and Concentration

D: Quantities in Chemical Reactions

D2: investigate quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, and solve related problems;

D2.1: use appropriate terminology related to quantities in chemical reactions, including, but not limited to: stoichiometry, percentage yield, limiting reagent, mole, and atomic mass

Chemical Equations
Limiting Reactants
Stoichiometry

D2.3: solve problems related to quantities in chemical reactions by performing calculations involving quantities in moles, number of particles, and atomic mass

Chemical Equations
Limiting Reactants
Stoichiometry

D2.4: determine the empirical formulae and molecular formulae of various chemical compounds, given molar masses and percentage composition or mass data

Chemical Equations
Stoichiometry

D2.5: calculate the corresponding mass, or quantity in moles or molecules, for any given reactant or product in a balanced chemical equation as well as for any other reactant or product in the chemical reaction

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

D2.6: solve problems related to quantities in chemical reactions by performing calculations involving percentage yield and limiting reagents

Limiting Reactants
Stoichiometry

D3: demonstrate an understanding of the mole concept and its significance to the quantitative analysis of chemical reactions.

D3.1: explain the law of definite proportions

Stoichiometry

D3.2: describe the relationships between Avogadro’s number, the mole concept, and the molar mass of any given substance

Chemical Equations
Stoichiometry

D3.4: explain the quantitative relationships expressed in a balanced chemical equation, using appropriate units of measure (e.g., moles, grams, atoms, ions, molecules)

Chemical Equations
Limiting Reactants
Stoichiometry

E: Solutions and Solubility

E1: analyse the origins and effects of water pollution, and a variety of economic, social, and environmental issues related to drinking water;

E1.1: analyse the origins and cumulative effects of pollutants that enter our water systems (e.g., landfill leachates, agricultural run-off, industrial effluents, chemical spills), and explain how these pollutants affect water quality

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

E2: investigate qualitative and quantitative properties of solutions, and solve related problems;

E2.1: use appropriate terminology related to aqueous solutions and solubility, including, but not limited to: concentration, solubility, precipitate, ionization, dissociation, pH, dilute, solute, and solvent

Solubility and Temperature
Titration

E2.7: determine the concentration of an acid or a base in a solution (e.g., the concentration of acetic acid in vinegar), using the acid–base titration technique

Titration

F: Gases and Atmospheric Chemistry

F2: investigate gas laws that explain the behaviour of gases, and solve related problems;

F2.1: use appropriate terminology related to gases and atmospheric chemistry, including, but not limited to: standard temperature, standard pressure, molar volume, and ideal gas

Boyle's Law and Charles' Law

F2.2: determine, through inquiry, the quantitative and graphical relationships between the pressure, volume, and temperature of a gas

Boyle's Law and Charles' Law

F2.3: solve quantitative problems by performing calculations based on Boyle’s law, Charles’s law, Gay-Lussac’s law, the combined gas law, Dalton’s law of partial pressures, and the ideal gas law

Boyle's Law and Charles' Law
Equilibrium and Pressure

F2.4: use stoichiometry to solve problems related to chemical reactions involving gases (e.g., problems involving moles, number of atoms, number of molecules, mass, and volume)

Stoichiometry

F3: demonstrate an understanding of the laws that explain the behaviour of gases.

F3.2: describe the different states of matter, and explain their differences in terms of the forces between atoms, molecules, and ions

Phase Changes

F3.3: use the kinetic molecular theory to explain the properties and behaviour of gases in terms of types and degrees of molecular motion

Temperature and Particle Motion

F3.4: describe, for an ideal gas, the quantitative relationships that exist between the variables of pressure, volume, temperature, and amount of substance

Boyle's Law and Charles' Law

F3.5: explain Dalton’s law of partial pressures, Boyle’s law, Charles’s law, Gay-Lussac’s law, the combined gas law, and the ideal gas law

Boyle's Law and Charles' Law

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

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