A: Scientific Investigation Skills and Career Exploration

A1: demonstrate scientific investigation skills (related to both inquiry and research) in the four areas of skills (initiating and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting, and communicating);

A1.1: formulate scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, and/or issues, make predictions, and/or formulate hypotheses to focus inquiries or research

Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A1.5: conduct inquiries, controlling some variables, adapting or extending procedures as required, and using standard equipment and materials safely, accurately, and effectively, to collect observations and data

Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A1.6: gather data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data using appropriate formats, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

A1.8: analyse and interpret qualitative and/or quantitative data to determine whether the evidence supports or refutes the initial prediction or hypothesis, identifying possible sources of error, bias, or uncertainty

Seed Germination
Evolution

A1.10: draw conclusions based on inquiry results and research findings, and justify their conclusions

Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

A1.13: express the results of any calculations involving data accurately and precisely

Diffusion
Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

B: Biology: Tissues, Organs, and Systems

B2: investigate cell division, cell specialization, and the organization of systems in animals, including humans, using various laboratory techniques;

B2.1: use appropriate terminology related to human cells, tissues, organs, and systems, including, but not limited to: absorption, anaphase, capillaries, concentration, differentiation, diffusion, interphase, metaphase, osmosis, prophase, red blood cells, regeneration, and telophase

Circulatory System
Osmosis

B3: demonstrate an understanding of the hierarchical organization of cells, from tissues, to organs, to systems in animals, including humans.

B3.3: explain cell organization by describing the link between cells, tissues, organs, and systems in the human body

Circulatory System

B3.4: explain the general function of some of the systems in the human body (e.g., the function of the circulatory system is to transport materials through the body; the function of the digestive system is to absorb nutrients; the function of the respiratory system is to bring oxygen into and remove carbon dioxide from the body)

Circulatory System
Digestive System

C: Chemistry: Chemical Reactions and Their Practical Applications

C2: investigate, through inquiry, the characteristics of simple chemical reactions;

C2.1: use appropriate terminology related to chemical reactions, including, but not limited to: antacid, dilute, neutralization, product, reactant, and word equation

Chemical Changes
Chemical Equations
Equilibrium and Concentration

C2.2: construct molecular models of simple chemical reactions (e.g., C + O2 --> CO2; 2H2 + O2 --> 2H2O), and produce diagrams of these models

Chemical Equations

C2.3: conduct and observe inquiries related to simple chemical reactions, including synthesis, decomposition, and displacement reactions, and represent them using a variety of formats (e.g., word equations, balanced chemical equations, molecular models)

Chemical Changes
Dehydration Synthesis

C2.4: use an inquiry process to investigate the law of conservation of mass in a chemical reaction (e.g., compare the values before and after the reaction), and account for any discrepancies

Chemical Changes
Chemical Equations

C2.5: use an inquiry process to investigate acid– base neutralization reactions (e.g., neutralize a dilute solution of sodium hydroxide with dilute hydrochloric acid and extract the sodium chloride produced)

Titration

C2.6: conduct an inquiry to classify some common substances as acidic, basic, or neutral (e.g., use acid–base indicators or pH strips to classify common household substances)

pH Analysis
pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

C3: demonstrate an understanding of simple chemical reactions and the language and ways to represent them.

C3.1: describe the relationships between chemical formulae, composition, and names of simple compounds (e.g., carbon dioxide, CO2, has one more oxygen atom than carbon monoxide, CO)

Chemical Equations

C3.2: name and write the formulae for simple ionic and molecular compounds (e.g., NaCl, NaOH, H2O, CO2)

Ionic Bonds

C3.3: write word equations and balanced chemical equations for simple chemical reactions (e.g., 2H2 + O2 --> 2H2O)

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations
Equilibrium and Concentration

C3.4: describe the process of neutralization for simple acid–base reactions (i.e., an acid reacts with a base to form a salt and often water)

Titration

D: Earth and Space Science: Earth’s Dynamic Climate

D1: analyse effects of human activity on climate change, and effects of climate change on living things and natural systems;

D1.1: analyse, on the basis of research, various ways in which living things and natural systems have been affected by climate change (e.g., the effect of loss of permafrost on northern roads and housing; the effect of longer growing seasons in some regions on farmers; the effect of warming oceans on coral reefs), and communicate their findings

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D1.2: analyse ways in which human actions (e.g., burning fossil fuels, implementing tree-planting programs) have increased or decreased the production of greenhouse gases

Carbon Cycle
Greenhouse Effect - Metric

D2: investigate various natural and human factors that have an impact on climate change and global warming;

D2.1: use appropriate terminology related to Earth’s dynamic climate, including, but not limited to: anthropogenic, atmosphere, carbon footprint, carbon sink, climate, greenhouse gases, hydrosphere, and weather

Greenhouse Effect - Metric

D2.2: investigate the principles of the natural greenhouse effect, using simulations, diagrams, and/or models, and compare these principles to those of an actual greenhouse

Carbon Cycle
Greenhouse Effect - Metric

D2.4: conduct an inquiry to determine how different factors (e.g., an increase in surface temperature, an increase in water temperature) affect global warming and climate change

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Greenhouse Effect - Metric

D3: demonstrate an understanding of various natural and human factors that contribute to climate change and global warming.

D3.2: describe the natural greenhouse effect, its importance for life, and the difference between it and the anthropogenic greenhouse effect

Carbon Cycle
Greenhouse Effect - Metric

D3.4: identify different greenhouse gases (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, water vapour, nitrous oxide), and explain how they are produced naturally in the environment

Greenhouse Effect - Metric

D3.5: describe methods by which greenhouse gases are produced by humans (e.g., burning of biomass, chemical reactions involving pollutants)

Carbon Cycle
Greenhouse Effect - Metric

D3.6: identify the natural and human causes of climate change in the world and, in particular, how Canada contributes to climate change

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

E: Physics: Light and Applications of Optics

E2: investigate, through inquiry, properties of light, and predict its behaviour in mirrors and as it passes through different media;

E2.1: use appropriate terminology related to light and optics, including, but not limited to: angle of incidence, angle of reflection, angle of refraction, centre of curvature, focal length, luminescence, magnification, principal axis, radius of curvature, and vertex

Basic Prism
Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)
Refraction

E2.3: use an inquiry process to investigate the refraction of light as it passes through a variety of media (e.g., the angles of incidence and refraction as light passes through a clear acrylic block)

Basic Prism
Refraction

E2.4: predict the qualitative characteristics of images (e.g., location, orientation, size, type) formed by converging lenses, test their predictions through inquiry, and draw ray diagrams to record their observations

Ray Tracing (Lenses)

E2.7: construct an optical device (e.g., a funhouse mirror, a device that produces an optical illusion, a solar oven) that uses a variety of mirrors

Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

E3: demonstrate an understanding of characteristics and properties of light, particularly with respect to reflection and refraction and the addition and subtraction of colour.

E3.1: describe various types of light emissions (e.g., chemiluminescence, bioluminescence, incandescence, electric discharge) and how they produce light

Basic Prism
Refraction

E3.2: identify and label the visible and invisible regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and identify the colours that make up visible white light

Basic Prism
Herschel Experiment - Metric

E3.3: explain the laws of reflection of light, and identify ways in which light reflects from various types of mirrors (e.g., plane, converging, diverging)

Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

E3.4: describe qualitatively how visible light is refracted at the interface between two different media

Basic Prism
Refraction

E3.6: use subtractive colour theory to describe the effect of colour filters on white light

Basic Prism

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.