A: Reasoning With Data

A.1: collect, organize, represent, and make inferences from data using a variety of tools and strategies, and describe related applications;

A.1.1: read and interpret graphs (e.g., bar graph, broken-line graph, histogram) obtained from various sources (e.g., newspapers, magazines, Statistics Canada website)

Correlation
Graphing Skills
Histograms
Stem-and-Leaf Plots

A.1.2: explain the distinction between the terms population and sample, describe the characteristics of a good sample, and explain why sampling is necessary (e.g., time, cost, or physical constraints)

Polling: City
Polling: Neighborhood
Populations and Samples

A.1.4: represent categorical data by constructing graphs (e.g., bar graph, broken-line graph, circle graph) using a variety of tools (e.g., dynamic statistical software, graphing calculator, spreadsheet)

Graphing Skills
Stem-and-Leaf Plots

A.1.6: make and justify conclusions about a topic of personal interest by collecting, organizing (e.g., using spreadsheets), representing (e.g., using graphs), and making inferences from categorical data from primary sources (i.e., collected through measurement or observation) or secondary sources (e.g., electronic data from databases such as E-STAT, data from newspapers or magazines)

Box-and-Whisker Plots
Stem-and-Leaf Plots

A.1.8: gather, interpret, and describe information about applications of data management in the workplace and in everyday life

Box-and-Whisker Plots
Describing Data Using Statistics
Estimating Population Size

A.2: determine and represent probability, and identify and interpret its applications.

A.2.1: determine the theoretical probability of an event (i.e., the ratio of the number of favourable outcomes to the total number of possible outcomes, where all outcomes are equally likely), and represent the probability in a variety of ways (e.g., as a fraction, as a percent, as a decimal in the range 0 to 1)

Binomial Probabilities
Independent and Dependent Events
Probability Simulations
Theoretical and Experimental Probability

A.2.2: identify examples of the use of probability in the media (e.g., the probability of rain, of winning a lottery, of wait times for a service exceeding specified amounts) and various ways in which probability is represented (e.g., as a fraction, as a percent, as a decimal in the range 0 to 1)

Estimating Population Size
Independent and Dependent Events
Probability Simulations
Theoretical and Experimental Probability

A.2.4: compare, through investigation, the theoretical probability of an event with the experimental probability, and describe how uncertainty explains why they might differ (e.g., “I know that the theoretical probability of getting tails is 0.5, but that does not mean that I will always obtain 3 tails when I toss the coin 6 times”; “If a lottery has a 1 in 9 chance of winning, am I certain to win if I buy 9 tickets?”)

Geometric Probability
Independent and Dependent Events
Probability Simulations
Theoretical and Experimental Probability

B: Personal Finance

B.3: demonstrate an understanding of the process of filing a personal income tax return, and describe applications of the mathematics of personal finance.

B.3.7: gather, interpret, and describe information about applications of the mathematics of personal finance in the workplace (e.g., selling real estate, bookkeeping, managing a restaurant)

Household Energy Usage

C: Applications of Measurement

C.2: apply measurement concepts and skills to solve problems in measurement and design, to construct scale drawings and scale models, and to budget for a household improvement;

C.2.2: apply the concept of perimeter in familiar contexts (e.g., baseboard, fencing, door and window trim)

Perimeter and Area of Rectangles

C.2.4: solve problems involving the areas of rectangles, triangles, and circles, and of related composite shapes, in situations arising from real-world applications

Area of Parallelograms
Perimeter and Area of Rectangles

C.2.5: solve problems involving the volumes and surface areas of rectangular prisms, triangular prisms, and cylinders, and of related composite figures, in situations arising from real-world applications

Prisms and Cylinders

C.3: identify and describe situations that involve proportional relationships and the possible consequences of errors in proportional reasoning, and solve problems involving proportional reasoning, arising in applications from work and everyday life.

C.3.1: identify and describe applications of ratio and rate, and recognize and represent equivalent ratios (e.g., show that 4:6 represents the same ratio as 2:3 by showing that a ramp with a height of 4 m and a base of 6 m and a ramp with a height of 2 m and a base of 3 m are equally steep) and equivalent rates (e.g., recognize that paying $1.25 for 250 mL of tomato sauce is equivalent to paying $3.75 for 750 mL of the same sauce), using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, diagrams, dynamic geometry software)

Part-to-part and Part-to-whole Ratios

C.3.2: identify situations in which it is useful to make comparisons using unit rates, and solve problems that involve comparisons of unit rates

Household Energy Usage

C.3.3: identify and describe real-world applications of proportional reasoning (e.g., mixing concrete; calculating dosages; converting units; painting walls; calculating fuel consumption; calculating pay; enlarging patterns), distinguish between a situation involving a proportional relationship (e.g., recipes, where doubling the quantity of each ingredient doubles the number of servings; long-distance phone calls billed at a fixed cost per minute, where talking for half as many minutes costs half as much) and a situation involving a non-proportional relationship (e.g., cellular phone packages, where doubling the minutes purchased does not double the cost of the package; food purchases, where it can be less expensive to buy the same quantity of a product in one large package than in two or more small packages; hydro bills, where doubling consumption does not double the cost) in a personal and/or workplace context, and explain their reasoning

Beam to Moon (Ratios and Proportions) - Metric
Direct and Inverse Variation
Estimating Population Size
Household Energy Usage
Part-to-part and Part-to-whole Ratios

C.3.5: solve problems involving proportional reasoning in everyday life (e.g., applying fertilizers; mixing gasoline and oil for use in small engines; mixing cement; buying plants for flower beds; using pool or laundry chemicals; doubling recipes; estimating cooking time from the time needed per pound; determining the fibre content of different sizes of food servings)

Beam to Moon (Ratios and Proportions) - Metric
Direct and Inverse Variation
Estimating Population Size
Household Energy Usage
Part-to-part and Part-to-whole Ratios

C.3.6: solve problems involving proportional reasoning in work-related situations (e.g., calculating overtime pay; calculating pay for piecework; mixing concrete for small or large jobs)

Estimating Population Size

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

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