1: Mathematical Process

1.5: Connecting

1.5.1: make connections among mathematical concepts and procedures, and relate mathematical ideas to situations or phenomena drawn from other contexts (e.g., other curriculum areas, daily life, sports);

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

1.7: Communicating

1.7.1: communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using everyday language, a basic mathematical vocabulary, and a variety of representations, and observing basic mathematical conventions.

Fraction, Decimal, Percent (Area and Grid Models)

2: Number Sense and Numeration

2.1: read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100 000, decimal numbers to hundredths, proper and improper fractions, and mixed numbers;

2.1.1: represent, compare, and order whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.01 to 100 000, using a variety of tools (e.g., number lines with appropriate increments, base ten materials for decimals);

Comparing and Ordering Decimals
Fraction, Decimal, Percent (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Decimals (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Multiplying Decimals (Area Model)
Treasure Hunter (Decimals on the Number Line)

2.1.2: demonstrate an understanding of place value in whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.01 to 100 000, using a variety of tools and strategies (e.g., use numbers to represent 23 011 as 20 000 + 3000 + 0 + 10 + 1; use base ten materials to represent the relationship between 1, 0.1, and 0.01) (Sample problem: How many thousands cubes would be needed to make a base ten block for 100 000?);

Adding Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Cannonball Clowns (Number Line Estimation)
Comparing and Ordering Decimals
Modeling Decimals (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Multiplying Decimals (Area Model)
Subtracting Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Target Sum Card Game (Multi-digit Addition)
Treasure Hunter (Decimals on the Number Line)

2.1.5: represent, compare, and order fractional amounts with like denominators, including proper and improper fractions and mixed numbers, using a variety of tools (e.g., fraction circles, Cuisenaire rods, number lines) and using standard fractional notation;

Adding Fractions (Fraction Tiles)
Equivalent Fractions (Fraction Tiles)
Fraction Artist 1 (Area Models of Fractions)
Fraction Artist 2 (Area Models of Fractions)
Fraction Garden (Comparing Fractions)
Fractions Greater than One (Fraction Tiles)
Modeling Fractions (Area Models)
Number Line Frog Hop (Addition and Subtraction)
Toy Factory (Set Models of Fractions)
Treasure Hunter (Decimals on the Number Line)

2.1.6: demonstrate and explain the concept of equivalent fractions, using concrete materials (e.g., use fraction strips to show that 3/4 is equal to 9/12);

Equivalent Fractions (Fraction Tiles)
Factor Trees (Factoring Numbers)
Fraction Artist 2 (Area Models of Fractions)
Fractions Greater than One (Fraction Tiles)

2.1.7: demonstrate and explain equivalent representations of a decimal number, using concrete materials and drawings (e.g., use base ten materials to show that three tenths [0.3] is equal to thirty hundredths [0.30]);

Fraction, Decimal, Percent (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Decimals (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)

2.3: solve problems involving the multiplication and division of multi-digit whole numbers, and involving the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to hundredths, using a variety of strategies;

2.3.1: solve problems involving the addition, subtraction, and multiplication of whole numbers, using a variety of mental strategies (e.g., use the commutative property: 5 x 18 x 2 = 5 x 2 x 18, which gives 10 x 18 = 180);

Adding Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Cargo Captain (Multi-digit Subtraction)
Number Line Frog Hop (Addition and Subtraction)
Subtracting Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)

2.3.2: add and subtract decimal numbers to hundredths, including money amounts, using concrete materials, estimation, and algorithms (e.g., use 10 x 10 grids to add 2.45 and 3.25);

Adding Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Subtracting Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)

2.3.3: multiply two-digit whole numbers by two-digit whole numbers, using estimation, student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms;

Multiplying Decimals (Area Model)

2.3.4: divide three-digit whole numbers by one-digit whole numbers, using concrete materials, estimation, student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms;

No Alien Left Behind (Division with Remainders)

2.3.6: use estimation when solving problems involving the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution.

Adding Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Multiplying Decimals (Area Model)
Subtracting Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)

2.4: demonstrate an understanding of proportional reasoning by investigating whole-number rates.

2.4.2: determine and explain, through investigation using concrete materials, drawings, and calculators, the relationship between fractions (i.e., with denominators of 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, and 100) and their equivalent decimal forms (e.g., use a 10 x 10 grid to show that 2/5 = 40/100, which can also be represented as 0.4);

Fraction, Decimal, Percent (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Decimals (Area and Grid Models)

3: Measurement

3.1: estimate, measure, and record perimeter, area, temperature change, and elapsed time, using a variety of strategies;

3.1.2: estimate and determine elapsed time, with and without using a time line, given the durations of events expressed in minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, or years (Sample problem: You are travelling from Toronto to Montreal by train. If the train departs Toronto at 11:30 a.m. and arrives in Montreal at 4:56 p.m., how long will you be on the train?);

Elapsed Time

3.1.4: estimate and measure the perimeter and area of regular and irregular polygons, using a variety of tools (e.g., grid paper, geoboard, dynamic geometry software) and strategies.

Fido's Flower Bed (Perimeter and Area)

3.2: determine the relationships among units and measurable attributes, including the area of a rectangle and the volume of a rectangular prism.

3.2.1: select and justify the most appropriate standard unit (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, kilometre) to measure length, height, width, and distance, and to measure the perimeter of various polygons;

Fido's Flower Bed (Perimeter and Area)

3.2.2: solve problems requiring conversion from metres to centimetres and from kilometres to metres (Sample problem: Describe the multiplicative relationship between the number of centimetres and the number of metres that represent a length. Use this relationship to convert 5.1 m to centimetres.);

Cannonball Clowns (Number Line Estimation)

3.2.5: determine, through investigation using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, dynamic geometry software, grid paper) and strategies (e.g., building arrays), the relationships between the length and width of a rectangle and its area and perimeter, and generalize to develop the formulas [i.e., Area = length x width; Perimeter = (2 x length) + (2 x width)];

Chocomatic (Multiplication, Arrays, and Area)

3.2.6: solve problems requiring the estimation and calculation of perimeters and areas of rectangles (Sample problem: You are helping to fold towels, and you want them to stack nicely. By folding across the length and/or the width, you fold each towel a total of three times. You want the shape of each folded towel to be as close to a square as possible. Does it matter how you fold the towels?);

Area of Triangles
Fido's Flower Bed (Perimeter and Area)

4: Geometry and Spatial Sense

4.1: identify and classify two-dimensional shapes by side and angle properties, and compare and sort three-dimensional figures;

4.1.1: distinguish among polygons, regular polygons, and other two-dimensional shapes;

Classifying Quadrilaterals

4.3: identify and describe the location of an object, using the cardinal directions, and translate two-dimensional shapes.

4.3.1: locate an object using the cardinal directions (i.e., north, south, east, west) and a coordinate system (e.g., “If I walk 5 steps north and 3 steps east, I will arrive at the apple tree.”);

Points in the Coordinate Plane

4.3.2: compare grid systems commonly used on maps (i.e., the use of numbers and letters to identify an area; the use of a coordinate system based on the cardinal directions to describe a specific location);

Points in the Coordinate Plane
Points, Lines, and Equations

5: Patterning and Algebra

5.1: determine, through investigation using a table of values, relationships in growing and shrinking patterns, and investigate repeating patterns involving translations;

5.1.1: create, identify, and extend numeric and geometric patterns, using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, paper and pencil, calculators, spreadsheets);

Function Machines 1 (Functions and Tables)

5.1.2: build a model to represent a number pattern presented in a table of values that shows the term number and the term;

Function Machines 1 (Functions and Tables)

5.1.3: make a table of values for a pattern that is generated by adding or subtracting a number (i.e., a constant) to get the next term, or by multiplying or dividing by a constant to get the next term, given either the sequence (e.g., 12, 17, 22, 27, 32, …) or the pattern rule in words (e.g., start with 12 and add 5 to each term to get the next term);

Function Machines 1 (Functions and Tables)

6: Data Management and Probability

6.1: collect and organize discrete or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including broken-line graphs;

Graphing Skills

6.1.2: collect data by conducting a survey or an experiment (e.g., gather and record air temperature over a two-week period) to do with themselves, their environment, issues in their school or community, or content from another subject, and record observations or measurements;

Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.1.3: collect and organize discrete or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including broken-line graphs) that have appropriate titles, labels (e.g., appropriate units marked on the axes), and scales that suit the range and distribution of the data (e.g., to represent precipitation amounts ranging from 0 mm to 50 mm over the school year, use a scale of 5 mm for each unit on the vertical axis and show months on the horizontal axis), using a variety of tools (e.g., graph paper, simple spreadsheets, dynamic statistical software);

Graphing Skills

6.1.5: describe, through investigation, how a set of data is collected (e.g., by survey, measurement, observation) and explain whether the collection method is appropriate.

Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.2: read, describe, and interpret primary data and secondary data presented in charts and graphs, including broken-line graphs;

6.2.1: read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data (e.g., survey results, measurements, observations) and from secondary data (e.g., precipitation or temperature data in the newspaper, data from the Internet about heights of buildings and other structures), presented in charts, tables, and graphs (including broken-line graphs);

Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.2.2: calculate the mean for a small set of data and use it to describe the shape of the data set across its range of values, using charts, tables, and graphs (e.g., “The data values fall mainly into two groups on both sides of the mean.”; “The set of data is not spread out evenly around the mean.”);

Movie Reviewer (Mean and Median)
Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.2.3: compare similarities and differences between two related sets of data, using a variety of strategies (e.g., by representing the data using tally charts, stem-and-leaf plots, double bar graphs, or broken-line graphs; by determining measures of central tendency [i.e., mean, median, and mode]; by describing the shape of a data set across its range of values).

Graphing Skills
Mascot Election (Pictographs and Bar Graphs)
Movie Reviewer (Mean and Median)
Reaction Time 1 (Graphs and Statistics)
Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.3: represent as a fraction the probability that a specific outcome will occur in a simple probability experiment, using systematic lists and area models.

6.3.2: represent, using a common fraction, the probability that an event will occur in simple games and probability experiments (e.g., “My spinner has four equal sections and one of those sections is coloured red. The probability that I will land on red is 1/4.”);

Spin the Big Wheel! (Probability)

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.