1: Mathematical Process

1.7: Communicating

1.7.1: communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using everyday language, a basic mathematical vocabulary, and a variety of representations, and observing basic mathematical conventions.

Fraction, Decimal, Percent (Area and Grid Models)

2: Number Sense and Numeration

2.1: read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 10 000, decimal numbers to tenths, and simple fractions, and represent money amounts to $100;

2.1.2: demonstrate an understanding of place value in whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.1 to 10 000, using a variety of tools and strategies (e.g., use base ten materials to represent 9307 as 9000 + 300 + 0 + 7) (Sample problem: Use the digits 1, 9, 5, 4 to create the greatest number and the least number possible, and explain your thinking.);

Modeling Decimals (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Treasure Hunter (Decimals on the Number Line)

2.1.5: represent, compare, and order decimal numbers to tenths, using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials such as paper strips divided into tenths and base ten materials, number lines, drawings) and using standard decimal notation (Sample problem: Draw a partial number line that extends from 4.2 to 6.7, and mark the location of 5.6.);

Fraction, Decimal, Percent (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Decimals (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Treasure Hunter (Decimals on the Number Line)

2.1.6: represent fractions using concrete materials, words, and standard fractional notation, and explain the meaning of the denominator as the number of the fractional parts of a whole or a set, and the numerator as the number of fractional parts being considered;

Equivalent Fractions (Fraction Tiles)
Fraction Artist 1 (Area Models of Fractions)
Fraction Artist 2 (Area Models of Fractions)
Fraction Garden (Comparing Fractions)
Fraction, Decimal, Percent (Area and Grid Models)
Modeling Fractions (Area Models)
Toy Factory (Set Models of Fractions)

2.1.7: compare and order fractions (i.e., halves, thirds, fourths, fifths, tenths) by considering the size and the number of fractional parts (e.g., 4/5 is greater than 3/5 because there are more parts in 4/5; 1/4 is greater than 1/5 because the size of the part is larger in 1/4);

Adding Fractions (Fraction Tiles)
Equivalent Fractions (Fraction Tiles)
Fraction Artist 1 (Area Models of Fractions)
Fraction Garden (Comparing Fractions)
Modeling Fractions (Area Models)
Toy Factory (Set Models of Fractions)

2.1.8: compare fractions to the benchmarks of 0, 1/2 and 1 (e.g., 1/8 is closer to 0 than to 1/2; 3/5 is more than 1/2);

Fraction Artist 2 (Area Models of Fractions)

2.1.9: demonstrate and explain the relationship between equivalent fractions, using concrete materials (e.g., fraction circles, fraction strips, pattern blocks) and drawings (e.g., “I can say that 3/6 of my cubes are white, or half of the cubes are white. This means that 3/6 and 1/2 are equal.”);

Equivalent Fractions (Fraction Tiles)
Factor Trees (Factoring Numbers)
Fraction Artist 1 (Area Models of Fractions)
Fraction Artist 2 (Area Models of Fractions)
Fraction Garden (Comparing Fractions)
Fractions Greater than One (Fraction Tiles)
Modeling Fractions (Area Models)
Toy Factory (Set Models of Fractions)

2.3: solve problems involving the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of single- and multi-digit whole numbers, and involving the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to tenths and money amounts, using a variety of strategies;

2.3.1: add and subtract two-digit numbers, using a variety of mental strategies (e.g., one way to calculate 73 – 39 is to subtract 40 from 73 to get 33, and then add 1 back to get 34);

Adding Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Cargo Captain (Multi-digit Subtraction)
Number Line Frog Hop (Addition and Subtraction)
Subtracting Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)

2.3.8: multiply two-digit whole numbers by one-digit whole numbers, using a variety of tools (e.g., base ten materials or drawings of them, arrays), student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms;

Chocomatic (Multiplication, Arrays, and Area)
Critter Count (Modeling Multiplication)

2.3.9: divide two-digit whole numbers by one-digit whole numbers, using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, drawings) and student-generated algorithms;

No Alien Left Behind (Division with Remainders)

2.3.10: use estimation when solving problems involving the addition, subtraction, and multiplication of whole numbers, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution (Sample problem: A school is ordering pencils that come in boxes of 100. If there are 9 classes and each class needs about 110 pencils, estimate how many boxes the school should buy.).

Adding Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Multiplying Decimals (Area Model)
Subtracting Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)

3: Measurement

3.1: estimate, measure, and record length, perimeter, area, mass, capacity, volume, and elapsed time, using a variety of strategies;

3.1.1: estimate, measure, and record length, height, and distance, using standard units (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, metre, kilometre) (e.g., a pencil that is 75 mm long);

Cannonball Clowns (Number Line Estimation)
Measuring Trees

3.1.3: estimate, measure (i.e., using an analogue clock), and represent time intervals to the nearest minute;

Elapsed Time

3.1.4: estimate and determine elapsed time, with and without using a time line, given the durations of events expressed in five-minute intervals, hours, days, weeks, months, or years (Sample problem: If you wake up at 7:30 a.m., and it takes you 10 minutes to eat your breakfast, 5 minutes to brush your teeth, 25 minutes to wash and get dressed, 5 minutes to get your backpack ready, and 20 minutes to get to school, will you be at school by 9:00 a.m.?);

Elapsed Time

3.2: determine the relationships among units and measurable attributes, including the area and perimeter of rectangles.

3.2.10: compare, using a variety of tools (e.g., geoboard, patterns blocks, dot paper), two-dimensional shapes that have the same perimeter or the same area (Sample problem: Draw, using grid paper, as many different rectangles with a perimeter of 10 units as you can make on a geoboard.).

Fido's Flower Bed (Perimeter and Area)

4: Geometry and Spatial Sense

4.1: identify quadrilaterals and three-dimensional figures and classify them by their geometric properties, and compare various angles to benchmarks;

4.1.2: identify and compare different types of quadrilaterals (i.e., rectangle, square, trapezoid, parallelogram, rhombus) and sort and classify them by their geometric properties (e.g., sides of equal length; parallel sides; symmetry; number of right angles);

Classifying Quadrilaterals

4.3: identify and describe the location of an object, using a grid map, and reflect two-dimensional shapes.

4.3.1: identify and describe the general location of an object using a grid system (e.g., “The library is located at A3 on the map.”);

City Tour (Coordinates)

4.3.2: identify, perform, and describe reflections using a variety of tools (e.g., Mira, dot paper, technology);

Rock Art (Transformations)

4.3.3: create and analyse symmetrical designs by reflecting a shape, or shapes, using a variety of tools (e.g., pattern blocks, Mira, geoboard, drawings), and identify the congruent shapes in the designs.

Rock Art (Transformations)

5: Patterning and Algebra

5.1: describe, extend, and create a variety of numeric and geometric patterns, make predictions related to the patterns, and investigate repeating patterns involving reflections;

5.1.1: extend, describe, and create repeating, growing, and shrinking number patterns (e.g., “I created the pattern 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, …. I started at 1, then added 2, then added 1, then added 2, then added 1, and I kept repeating this.”);

Pattern Flip (Patterns)

5.1.3: create a number pattern involving addition, subtraction, or multiplication, given a pattern rule expressed in words (e.g., the pattern rule “start at 1 and multiply each term by 2 to get the next term” generates the sequence 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, …);

Function Machines 1 (Functions and Tables)
Pattern Flip (Patterns)

5.1.4: make predictions related to repeating geometric and numeric patterns (Sample problem: Create a pattern block train by alternating one green triangle with one red trapezoid. Predict which block will be in the 30th place.);

Pattern Flip (Patterns)

5.2: demonstrate an understanding of equality between pairs of expressions, using addition, subtraction, and multiplication.

5.2.1: determine, through investigation, the inverse relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., since 4 x 5 = 20, then 20 ÷ 5 = 4; since 35 ÷ 5 = 7, then 7 x 5 = 35);

Factor Trees (Factoring Numbers)
Function Machines 3 (Functions and Problem Solving)

5.2.3: identify, through investigation (e.g., by using sets of objects in arrays, by drawing area models), and use the commutative property of multiplication to facilitate computation with whole numbers (e.g., “I know that 15 x 7 x 2 equals 15 x 2 x 7. This is easier to multiply in my head because I get 30 x 7 = 210.”);

Chocomatic (Multiplication, Arrays, and Area)
Critter Count (Modeling Multiplication)

5.2.4: identify, through investigation (e.g., by using sets of objects in arrays, by drawing area models), and use the distributive property of multiplication over addition to facilitate computation with whole numbers (e.g., “I know that 9 x 52 equals 9 x 50 + 9 x 2. This is easier to calculate in my head because I get 450 + 18 = 468.”).

Chocomatic (Multiplication, Arrays, and Area)

6: Data Management and Probability

6.1: collect and organize discrete primary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs;

Graphing Skills

6.1.2: collect and organize discrete primary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs) that have appropriate titles, labels (e.g., appropriate units marked on the axes), and scales (e.g., with appropriate increments) that suit the range and distribution of the data, using a variety of tools (e.g., graph paper, simple spreadsheets, dynamic statistical software).

Graphing Skills

6.2: read, describe, and interpret primary data and secondary data presented in charts and graphs, including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs;

6.2.1: read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data (e.g., survey results, measurements, observations) and from secondary data (e.g., temperature data in the newspaper, data from the Internet about endangered species), presented in charts, tables, and graphs (including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs);

Reaction Time 1 (Graphs and Statistics)
Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.2.2: demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of median (e.g., “The median is the value in the middle of the data. If there are two middle values, you have to calculate the middle of those two values.”), and determine the median of a set of data (e.g., “I used a stem-and-leaf plot to help me find the median.”);

Movie Reviewer (Mean and Median)
Reaction Time 1 (Graphs and Statistics)
Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.2.3: describe the shape of a set of data across its range of values, using charts, tables, and graphs (e.g. “The data values are spread out evenly.”; “The set of data bunches up around the median.”);

Movie Reviewer (Mean and Median)
Reaction Time 1 (Graphs and Statistics)
Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.2.4: compare similarities and differences between two related sets of data, using a variety of strategies (e.g., by representing the data using tally charts, stem-and-leaf plots, or double bar graphs; by determining the mode or the median; by describing the shape of a data set across its range of values).

Graphing Skills
Mascot Election (Pictographs and Bar Graphs)
Movie Reviewer (Mean and Median)
Reaction Time 1 (Graphs and Statistics)
Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.3: predict the results of a simple probability experiment, then conduct the experiment and compare the prediction to the results.

6.3.1: predict the frequency of an outcome in a simple probability experiment, explaining their reasoning; conduct the experiment; and compare the result with the prediction (Sample problem: If you toss a pair of number cubes 20 times and calculate the sum for each toss, how many times would you expect to get 12? 7? 1? Explain your thinking. Then conduct the experiment and compare the results with your predictions.);

Spin the Big Wheel! (Probability)

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.