1: Mathematical Process

1.7: Communicating

1.7.1: communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using everyday language, a developing mathematical vocabulary, and a variety of representations.

Fraction, Decimal, Percent (Area and Grid Models)

2: Number Sense and Numeration

2.1: read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 1000, and use concrete materials to represent fractions and money amounts to $10;

2.1.1: represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 1000, using a variety of tools (e.g., base ten materials or drawings of them, number lines with increments of 100 or other appropriate amounts);

Modeling Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)

2.3: solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of single- and multi-digit whole numbers, using a variety of strategies, and demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division.

2.3.3: use estimation when solving problems involving addition and subtraction, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution;

Adding Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)
Subtracting Whole Numbers and Decimals (Base-10 Blocks)

3: Measurement

3.1: estimate, measure, and record length, perimeter, area, mass, capacity, time, and temperature, using standard units;

3.1.1: estimate, measure, and record length, height, and distance, using standard units (i.e., centimetre, metre, kilometre) (Sample problem: While walking with your class, stop when you think you have travelled one kilometre.);

Cannonball Clowns (Number Line Estimation)
Measuring Trees

3.1.6: estimate, measure, and record the perimeter of two-dimensional shapes, through investigation using standard units (Sample problem: Estimate, measure, and record the perimeter of your notebook.);

Fido's Flower Bed (Perimeter and Area)

3.1.7: estimate, measure (i.e., using centimetre grid paper, arrays), and record area (e.g., if a row of 10 connecting cubes is approximately the width of a book, skip counting down the cover of the book with the row of cubes [i.e., counting 10, 20, 30,...] is one way to determine the area of the book cover);

Chocomatic (Multiplication, Arrays, and Area)
Fido's Flower Bed (Perimeter and Area)

3.2: compare, describe, and order objects, using attributes measured in standard units.

3.2.1: compare standard units of length (i.e., centimetre, metre, kilometre) (e.g., centimetres are smaller than metres), and select and justify the most appropriate standard unit to measure length;

Cannonball Clowns (Number Line Estimation)

3.2.2: compare and order objects on the basis of linear measurements in centimetres and/or metres (e.g., compare a 3 cm object with a 5 cm object; compare a 50 cm object with a 1 m object) in problem-solving contexts;

Cannonball Clowns (Number Line Estimation)

4: Geometry and Spatial Sense

4.2: describe relationships between two-dimensional shapes, and between two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures;

4.2.5: identify congruent two-dimensional shapes by manipulating and matching concrete materials (e.g., by translating, reflecting, or rotating pattern blocks).

Rock Art (Transformations)

4.3: identify and describe the locations and movements of shapes and objects.

4.3.3: complete and describe designs and pictures of images that have a vertical, horizontal, or diagonal line of symmetry (Sample problem: Draw the missing portion of the given butterfly on grid paper).

Quilting Bee (Symmetry)

5: Patterning and Algebra

5.1: describe, extend, and create a variety of numeric patterns and geometric patterns;

5.1.3: extend repeating, growing, and shrinking number patterns (Sample problem: Write the next three terms in the pattern 4, 8, 12, 16, ….);

Function Machines 1 (Functions and Tables)
Pattern Finder
Pattern Flip (Patterns)

5.1.4: create a number pattern involving addition or subtraction, given a pattern represented on a number line or a pattern rule expressed in words (Sample problem: Make a number pattern that starts at 0 and grows by adding 7 each time.);

Function Machines 1 (Functions and Tables)
Pattern Flip (Patterns)

5.1.5: represent simple geometric patterns using a number sequence, a number line, or a bar graph (e.g., the given growing pattern of toothpick squares can be represented numerically by the sequence 4, 7, 10, …, which represents the number of toothpicks used to make each figure);

Pattern Flip (Patterns)

5.1.6: demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding that a pattern results from repeating an action (e.g., clapping, taking a step forward every second), repeating an operation (e.g., addition, subtraction), using a transformation (e.g., slide, flip, turn), or making some other repeated change to an attribute (e.g., colour, orientation).

Pattern Flip (Patterns)

5.2: demonstrate an understanding of equality between pairs of expressions, using addition and subtraction of one- and two-digit numbers.

5.2.1: determine, through investigation, the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., since 4 + 5 = 9, then 9 – 5 = 4; since 16 – 9 = 7, then 7 + 9 = 16);

Function Machines 3 (Functions and Problem Solving)

6: Data Management and Probability

6.1: collect and organize categorical or discrete primary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs, with labels ordered appropriately along horizontal axes, as needed;

6.1.2: collect data by conducting a simple survey about themselves, their environment, issues in their school or community, or content from another subject;

Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.1.3: collect and organize categorical or discrete primary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including vertical and horizontal bar graphs), with appropriate titles and labels and with labels ordered appropriately along horizontal axes, as needed, using many-to-one correspondence (e.g., in a pictograph, one car sticker represents 3 cars; on a bar graph, one square represents 2 students) (Sample problem: Graph data related to the eye colour of students in the class, using a vertical bar graph. Why does the scale on the vertical axis include values that are not in the set of data?).

Graphing Skills
Mascot Election (Pictographs and Bar Graphs)

6.2: read, describe, and interpret primary data presented in charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal bar graphs;

6.2.1: read primary data presented in charts, tables, and graphs (including vertical and horizontal bar graphs), then describe the data using comparative language, and describe the shape of the data (e.g., “Most of the data are at the high end.”; “All of the data values are different.”);

Mascot Election (Pictographs and Bar Graphs)
Movie Reviewer (Mean and Median)
Prairie Ecosystem
Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.2.3: demonstrate an understanding of mode (e.g., “The mode is the value that shows up most often on a graph.”), and identify the mode in a set of data.

Movie Reviewer (Mean and Median)
Reaction Time 1 (Graphs and Statistics)
Reaction Time 2 (Graphs and Statistics)

6.3: predict and investigate the frequency of a specific outcome in a simple probability experiment.

6.3.1: predict the frequency of an outcome in a simple probability experiment or game (e.g., “I predict that an even number will come up 5 times and an odd number will come up 5 times when I roll a number cube 10 times.”), then perform the experiment, and compare the results with the predictions, using mathematical language;

Spin the Big Wheel! (Probability)

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.