6.1: Materials can be classified as pure substances or mixtures, depending on their chemical and physical properties.

6.1.a: Mixtures are made of combinations of elements and/or compounds, and they can be separated by using a variety of physical means.

6.1.a.1: Everything is made of matter. All matter has mass and takes up space (volume). Mass differs from weight in that it is unrelated to gravitational forces.

 Weight and Mass

6.1.a.2: Characteristic properties of matter, such as magnetic attraction, conductivity, density, boiling point, melting point and solubility, can be used to identify substances. Characteristic properties do not vary with the amount of the substance.

 Circuit Builder
 Conduction and Convection
 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory
 Magnetism

6.1.b: Pure substances can be either elements or compounds, and they cannot be broken down by physical means.

6.1.b.2: The Periodic Table of Elements is used to organize the elements into groups or families that have similar properties. Element names are represented by letter symbols on the Periodic Table.

 Element Builder

6.1.b.9: In a chemical reaction, the same amount of matter (mass) is present at the start and the end.

 Chemical Changes
 Chemical Equations

6.2: An ecosystem is composed of all the populations that are living in a certain space and the physical factors with which they interact.

6.2.a: Populations in ecosystems are affected by biotic factors, such as other populations, and abiotic factors, such as soil and water supply.

6.2.a.1: Ecosystems are complex interactions among living things and the features of the environment they inhabit. The environmental (abiotic) features of an environment determine the living (biotic) things that can survive there. Environmental features include things such as soil, minerals, climate, water, sunlight, and wind.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Food Chain

6.2.a.2: Interactions among biotic and abiotic factors support the flow of energy and cycling of materials such as oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen in ecosystems.

 Pond Ecosystem

6.2.a.6: Plants and animals within an ecosystem interact in various ways as they compete for limited resources (e.g., food, water, living space). Relationships among organisms can be beneficial or harmful to one or both organisms.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Food Chain

6.2.a.7: Populations of species within an ecosystem are affected by the availability and quality of resources such as food, water, living space, or mates.

 Food Chain
 Rabbit Population by Season

6.2.a.8: Predator-prey relationships contribute to controlling populations in an ecosystem. Increases or decreases in prey populations result in corresponding increases or decreases in predator populations. A balanced population of predators and prey increases the variety of species (biodiversity) in an area.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Food Chain
 Prairie Ecosystem

6.2.a.10: All organisms cause changes to the environment in which they live. Some of the changes caused by organisms can be helpful to the ecosystem and others can be harmful.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

6.2.b: Populations in ecosystems can be categorized as producers, consumers and decomposers of organic matter.

6.2.b.1: The sun is the main source of energy on Earth. During photosynthesis, green plants use the energy of sunlight to change the elements in carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H20) into materials (simple carbohydrates) that are a source of energy for the plant to carry on its life processes.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Growing Plants
 Photosynthesis Lab

6.2.b.2: Photosynthesis is affected by abiotic factors such as amount of sunlight, availability of water and air temperature.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Photosynthesis Lab
 Pond Ecosystem

6.2.b.3: Green plants are the producers in an ecosystem; they rely directly on sunlight to produce the materials they use for energy.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

6.2.b.4: Plants are a source of energy (food) and nutrients for animals that consume them. Energy passed to consumers that eat plants came indirectly from the sun as a result of photosynthesis. Some animals consume plants, and other animals consume animals that eat plants in predator-prey relationships.

 Energy Conversions
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem
 Plants and Snails
 Prairie Ecosystem

6.2.b.6: Decomposers (mainly bacteria and fungi) consume dead plants and animals and break down organic materials, returning nutrients to the environment for reuse by other organisms.

 Forest Ecosystem

6.2.b.7: Food chains are models that show how materials and energy are transferred from producers to different levels of consumers in an ecosystem. The basis of every food chain is the energy stored in green plants.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem
 Prairie Ecosystem

6.2.b.8: Food webs are models that show the complex variety of energy sources available to most consumers in an ecosystem.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Forest Ecosystem

6.2.b.9: Connecticut has forest and park ecosystems, as well as fresh water and marine ecosystems that include a variety of plants and animals.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Forest Ecosystem
 Growing Plants

6.2.b.10: An energy pyramid is a model that shows the availability and use of energy in an ecosystem. A large number of producers and primary consumers support a smaller number of higher-level consumers due to the consumption and loss of energy at each consumer level.

 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem

6.3: Variations in the amount of the sun’s energy hitting the earth’s surface affects daily and seasonal weather patterns.

6.3.a: Local and regional weather are affected by the amount of solar energy the area receives and proximity to a large body of water.

6.3.a.2: Weather on Earth is caused by the daily changes in the temperature, pressure and amount of moisture in the lower atmosphere.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

6.3.a.3: Climate is the long-term conditions experienced by different regions on earth, and is influenced by the amount of solar energy penetrating the atmosphere to reach Earth’s surface.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

6.3.a.16: Connecticut often has rapidly changing weather because three patterns of moving air interact here: cold, dry air from the north, warm, moist air from the Atlantic Ocean coastline, and air moving across the US from west to east.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds
 Hurricane Motion
 Weather Maps

6.4: Water moving across and through earth materials carries with it the products of human activities.

6.4.a: Most precipitation that falls on Connecticut eventually reaches Long Island Sound.

6.4.a.8: Water quality is important to support a variety of aquatic life and for human consumption. Water quality is evaluated by measuring indicators such as levels of dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity and the presence of other dissolved substances. Substances such as heavy metals (e.g., lead and aluminum), sulfur, fertilizers, and road salt are pollutants that may be dissolved in surface water or ground water, making the water unhealthy.

 Pond Ecosystem

6.4.a.9: Water entering Long Island Sound carries with it the products of human use. These pollutants negatively impact the aquatic life, commercial and recreational uses of the Sound.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

6.4.a.16: Laws, regulations and remedial actions have helped to protect and restore water resources.

 Paramecium Homeostasis

Correlation last revised: 1/19/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.