PI: Science Processes and Inquiry

PI.1: Observing is the first action taken by the learner to acquire new information about an organism or event. Opportunities for observation are developed through the use of a variety of scientific tools, allowing the student to distinguish between observation and inference. Measurement allows observations to be quantified. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.1.2: Use appropriate tools with accuracy and precision (e.g., microscope, pipette, metric ruler, graduated cylinder, thermometer, balance, stopwatch) when measuring cells, organisms, populations, and ecosystems.

 Triple Beam Balance

PI.1.3: Use appropriate International System of Units (SI) (i.e., grams, meters, liters, degrees Celsius, and seconds) and SI prefixes (i.e., micro-, milli-, centi-, and kilo-) when measuring objects and/or events.

 Triple Beam Balance

PI.2: Classifying establishes order. Organisms and events are classified based on similarities, differences, and interrelationships. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.2.1: Using observable properties, place cells, organisms, and/or events into a biological classification system (e.g., dichotomous keys, taxonomy charts, cladograms).

 Dichotomous Keys

PI.2.2: Identify the properties by which a biological classification system is based.

 Dichotomous Keys

PI.3: Understanding experimental design requires that students recognize the components of a valid experiment. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.3.1: Evaluate the design of a biology laboratory experiment.

 Real-Time Histogram
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

PI.3.2: Identify the independent variables, dependent variables, controlled variables, and control set-up in an experiment.

 Diffusion
 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Pendulum Clock
 Seed Germination

PI.3.3: Use mathematics to show relationships within a given set of observations (e.g., population studies, biomass, probability).

 Food Chain
 Pendulum Clock

PI.4: Interpreting is the process of recognizing patterns in collected data by making inferences, predictions, or conclusions. Communicating is the process of describing, recording, and reporting experimental procedures and results to others. Communication may be oral, written, or mathematical and includes organizing ideas, using appropriate vocabulary, graphs, other visual representations, and mathematical equations. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.4.3: Interpret data tables, line, bar, trend, and/or circle graphs from existing science research or student experiments.

 Distance-Time Graphs
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Identifying Nutrients

PI.4.4: Determine if results of biological science investigations support or do not support hypotheses.

 Diffusion
 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Pendulum Clock

PI.4.5: Evaluate experimental data to draw the conclusion that is best supported by the evidence.

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Pendulum Clock

PI.4.8: Identify and/or create an appropriate graph or chart from collected data, tables, or written description (e.g., population studies, plant growth, heart rate).

PI.4.8.a: Translate quantitative information expressed in words into visual form (e.g., a table or chart).

 Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

PI.4.8.b: Translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., a table, chart or equation) into words.

 Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

PI.5: Modeling is the active process of forming a mental or physical representation from data, patterns, or relationships to facilitate understanding and enhance prediction. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.5.3: Compare a given model to the living world.

 Determining a Spring Constant

PI.6: Inquiry can be defined as the skills necessary to carry out the process of scientific or systemic thinking. In order for inquiry to occur students must have the opportunity to make observation, pose questions, formulate testable hypotheses, carry out experiments, and make conclusions based on evidence. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.6.1: Ask a scientific question, formulate a testable hypothesis, and design an appropriate experiment relating to the living world.

 Effect of Temperature on Gender

PI.6.2: Design and conduct biological investigations in which variables are identified and controlled.

 Diffusion
 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

PI.6.3: Use a variety of technologies (e.g., probes, handheld digital devices, electrophoresis equipment, digital cameras, software, calculators, digital balances, microscopes, measuring instruments, and computers) to collect, analyze and display data.

 Triple Beam Balance

1: Cells are the fundamental unit of life, composed of a variety of structures that perform functions necessary to maintain life. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

1.1: Cells are composed of a variety of structures such as the nucleus, cell/plasma membrane, cell wall, cytoplasm, ribosomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts.

1.1.a: The cell/plasma membrane functions (i.e., active transport, passive transport, diffusion, osmosis, and surface area to volume ratio) to maintain homeostasis.

 Osmosis

1.1.b: Differentiate among hypotonic, hypertonic, and isotonic conditions.

 Cell Structure

1.2: In multicellular organisms, cells have levels of organization (i.e., cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, organisms).

 Circulatory System

2: DNA determines the characteristics of organisms. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

2.2: A sorting and recombination of genes during sexual reproduction results in a great variety of possible gene combinations from the offspring of any two parents (i.e., Punnett squares and pedigrees). Students will understand concepts in a single trait cross (e.g., alleles, dominant trait, recessive trait, phenotype, genotype, homozygous, heterozygous, incomplete dominance, and sex-linked traits).

 Chicken Genetics
 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Human Karyotyping
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

3: Diversity of species is developed through gradual processes over many generations. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

3.2: Characteristics of populations change through the mechanism of natural selection. These biological adaptations, including changes in structures, behaviors, and/or physiology, may enhance or limit survival and reproductive success within a particular environment.

 Microevolution
 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

4: Interdependence of organisms in an environment includes the interrelationships and interactions between and among organisms. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

4.2: Living organisms have the capacity to produce populations of infinite size, but environments and resources limit population size (e.g., carrying capacity, limiting factors, ecological succession).

 Food Chain
 Rabbit Population by Season

5: Living systems require a continuous input of energy to maintain their chemical and physical organizations. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

5.1: The complexity and organization of organisms accommodates the need for obtaining, transforming, transporting, releasing, and eliminating the matter and energy used to sustain the organism (i.e., photosynthesis and cellular respiration).

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Cell Structure
 Osmosis
 Paramecium Homeostasis

5.2: As matter and energy flow through different levels of organization of living systems and between living systems and the physical environment, chemical elements are recombined in different ways by different structures. Matter and energy are conserved in each change (i.e., water cycle, carbon cycle, nitrogen cycle, food webs, and energy pyramids).

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem
 Pond Ecosystem

5.3: Matter on earth cycles among the living (biotic) and nonliving (abiotic) components of the biosphere.

 Pond Ecosystem

Correlation last revised: 1/19/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.