PI: Science Processes and Inquiry

PI.1: Observing is the first action taken by the learner to acquire new information about an object, organism, or event. Opportunities for observation are developed through the use of a variety of scientific tools. Measurement allows observations to be quantified. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.1.1: Identify qualitative and/or quantitative changes given conditions (e.g., temperature, mass, volume, time, position, length) before, during, and after an event.

 Measuring Volume

PI.1.2: Use appropriate tools (e.g., metric ruler, graduated cylinder, thermometer, balances, spring scales, stopwatches, computers and handheld data collection devices) to measure objects, organisms, and/or events.

 Measuring Trees
 Triple Beam Balance

PI.1.3: Use appropriate International System of Units (SI) (i.e., grams, meters, liters, degrees Celsius, and seconds) and SI prefixes (i.e., milli-, centi-, and kilo-) when measuring objects, organisms and/or events.

 Measuring Volume

PI.2: Classifying establishes order. Objects, organisms, and events are classified based on similarities, differences, and interrelationships. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.2.1: Using observable properties, place an object, organism, and/or event into a classification system (e.g., dichotomous keys, periodic table, biological hierarchy).

 Dichotomous Keys

PI.3: Understanding experimental designs requires that students recognize the components of a valid experiment. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.3.1: Evaluate the design of a scientific investigation.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Real-Time Histogram
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions
 Time Estimation

PI.3.2: Identify variables and/or controls in an experimental setup: independent variable and dependent variable.

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Pendulum Clock
 Seed Germination

PI.3.3: Identify a testable hypothesis for an experiment.

 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Seed Germination

PI.3.4: Follow a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Pendulum Clock
 Seed Germination

PI.4: Interpreting is the process of recognizing patterns in collected data by making inferences, predictions, or conclusions. Communicating is the process of describing, recording, and reporting experimental procedures and results to others. Communication may be oral, written, or mathematical and includes organizing ideas, using appropriate vocabulary, graphs, other visual representations, and mathematical equations. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.4.1: Report and record both quantitative/qualitative data in an appropriate method when given an experimental procedure or data.

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Pendulum Clock

PI.4.2: Interpret data tables, line, bar, trend, and/or circle graphs.

 Distance-Time Graphs
 Graphing Skills

PI.4.4: Determine if results of investigations support or do not support hypotheses.

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Pendulum Clock

PI.4.5: Communicate scientific processes, procedures, and conclusions (e.g., model, poster, diagram, journal entry, lab report, scientific paper, oral presentation, and digital presentation).

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume

PI.5: Inquiry can be defined as the skills necessary to carry out the process of scientific thinking. In order for inquiry to occur students must have the opportunity to make observations, pose questions, formulate testable hypotheses, carry out experiments, and make conclusions based on evidence. The student will accomplish these objectives to meet this process standard.

PI.5.1: Ask questions that can be answered through scientific investigation.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

PI.5.2: Design and conduct experiments utilizing scientific processes.

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Growing Plants
 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram
 Seed Germination
 Time Estimation

PI.5.4: Understand the value of technology and use technology to gather data and analyze results of investigations (e.g., probes, hand-held digital devices, digital cameras, software, computers, calculators, digital balances, GPS).

 Trebuchet

1: Physical characteristics of objects can be described using shape, size, and mass whereas the materials from which objects are made can be described using color and texture. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

1.1: Matter has physical properties that can be measured (i.e., mass, volume, temperature, color, texture, and density). Physical changes of a substance do not alter the chemical nature of a substance (e.g., phase changes of water, sanding wood).

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Measuring Volume
 Mineral Identification

2: Living systems at all levels of organization demonstrate the complementary nature of structure and function. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

2.1: Living systems are organized by levels of complexity (i.e., cells, tissues, organs, systems).

 Circulatory System

3: Reproduction is the process by which organisms give rise to offspring. Heredity is the passing of traits to offspring. All organisms must be able to grown and reproduce. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

3.1: Characteristics of an organism result from inheritance and from interactions with the environment (e.g., genes, chromosomes, DNA, inherited traits, cell division).

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

4: All organisms must be able to maintain stable internal conditions while living in a constantly changing external environment. Behavioral response is a set of actions determined in part by heredity and in part by experience. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

4.1: Living organisms strive to maintain a constant internal environment (i.e., homeostasis).

 Human Homeostasis
 Paramecium Homeostasis

4.2: Living organisms have physical and/or behavioral responses to external stimuli (e.g., hibernation, migration, geotropism).

 Human Homeostasis

5: The Earth is mostly rock, three-fourths of its surface is covered by a relatively thin layer of water, and the entire planet is surrounded by a relatively thin blanket of air, and is able to support life. The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

5.1: Global patterns of atmospheric movement influence local weather such as oceans? effect on climate (e.g., sea breezes, land breezes, ocean currents). Clouds, formed by the condensation of water vapor, affect local weather and climate.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

5.2: The solid crust of the earth consists of separate plates that move very slowly pressing against one another in some places and pulling apart in other places (i.e., volcanoes, earthquakes, mountain creation).

 Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station
 Plate Tectonics

6: The earth is the third planet from the sun in a system that includes the moon, the sun, seven other planets and their moons, and smaller objects (e.g., asteroids, comets, dwarf planets). The student will engage in investigations that integrate the process standards and lead to the discovery of the following objectives:

6.1: Most objects in the solar system are in regular and predictable motion. Those motions explain such phenomena as the day, the year, phases of the moon, and eclipses.

 2D Eclipse
 3D Eclipse
 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases
 Phases of the Moon
 Solar System Explorer

6.2: Seasons result from variations in the amount of the sun?s energy hitting the surface, due to the tilt of the earth?s rotation on its axis and the length of the day. The relationship of motion of the Sun, Earth, and Earth?s Moon is a result of the force of gravity.

 Seasons in 3D
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun
 Seasons: Why do we have them?
 Summer and Winter

Correlation last revised: 5/21/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.