H.P.1A: The practices of science and engineering support the development of science concepts, develop the habits of mind that are necessary for scientific thinking, and allow students to engage in science in ways that are similar to those used by scientists and engineers.

H.P.1A.1: Ask questions to

H.P.1A.1.2: refine models, explanations, or designs, or

Pendulum Clock

H.P.1A.1.3: extend the results of investigations or challenge scientific arguments or claims.

Photoelectric Effect

H.P.1A.2: Develop, use, and refine models to

H.P.1A.2.1: understand or represent phenomena, processes, and relationships,

Atwood Machine
Center of Mass
Coulomb Force (Static)
Determining a Spring Constant
Doppler Shift
Gravity Pitch
Half-life
Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Orbital Motion - Kepler's Laws

H.P.1A.2.2: test devices or solutions, or

Trebuchet

H.P.1A.2.3: communicate ideas to others.

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)
Ripple Tank

H.P.1A.3: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to answer questions, test hypotheses, and develop explanations:

H.P.1A.3.1: formulate scientific questions and testable hypotheses based on credible scientific information,

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

H.P.1A.3.2: identify materials, procedures, and variables,

Pendulum Clock

H.P.1A.3.4: record and represent data in an appropriate form. Use appropriate safety procedures.

Pendulum Clock
Period of Mass on a Spring
Reaction Time 1 (Graphs and Statistics)
Real-Time Histogram

H.P.1A.4: Analyze and interpret data from informational texts and data collected from investigations using a range of methods (such as tabulation, graphing, or statistical analysis) to

H.P.1A.4.1: reveal patterns and construct meaning,

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Half-life
Pendulum Clock
Ripple Tank
Roller Coaster Physics

H.P.1A.4.2: support or refute hypotheses, explanations, claims, or designs, or

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock

H.P.1A.4.3: evaluate the strength of conclusions.

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock

H.P.1A.5: Use mathematical and computational thinking to

H.P.1A.5.1: use and manipulate appropriate English and metric units,

Unit Conversions

H.P.1A.5.2: express relationships between variables for models and investigations, or

Determining a Spring Constant
Fan Cart Physics
Pendulum Clock
Photoelectric Effect
Roller Coaster Physics

H.P.1A.6: Construct explanations of phenomena using

H.P.1A.6.3: predictions based on observations and measurements, or

Cell Respiration

H.P.1A.6.4: data communicated in graphs, tables, or diagrams.

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)
Seasons Around the World

H.P.1B: Technology is any modification to the natural world created to fulfill the wants and needs of humans. The engineering design process involves a series of iterative steps used to solve a problem and often leads to the development of a new or improved technology.

H.P.1B.1: Construct devices or design solutions using scientific knowledge to solve specific problems or needs:

H.P.1B.1.3: generate and communicate ideas for possible devices or solutions,

Trebuchet

H.P.1B.1.4: build and test devices or solutions,

Pendulum Clock
Trebuchet

H.P.1B.1.5: determine if the devices or solutions solved the problem and refine the design if needed, and

Trebuchet

H.P.1B.1.6: communicate the results.

Trebuchet

H.P.2A: The linear motion of an object can be described by its displacement, velocity, and acceleration.

H.P.2A.1: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations on the straight-line motion of an object to include an interpretation of the object's displacement, time of motion, constant velocity, average velocity, and constant acceleration.

Atwood Machine
Free-Fall Laboratory

H.P.2A.4: Develop and use models to represent an object's displacement, velocity, and acceleration (including vector diagrams, data tables, motion graphs, dot motion diagrams, and mathematical formulas).

Distance-Time Graphs
Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

H.P.2A.5: Construct explanations for what is meant by ?constant? velocity and ?constant? acceleration (including writing descriptions of the object's motion and calculating the sign and magnitude of the slope of the line on a position-time and velocity-time graph).

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs

H.P.2B: The interactions among objects and their subsequent motion can be explained and predicted by analyzing the forces acting on the objects and applying Newton's laws of motion.

H.P.2B.1: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations involving the motion of an object to determine the relationships among the net force on the object, its mass, and its acceleration (Newton's second law of motion, Fnet = ma) and analyze collected data to construct an explanation of the object's motion using Newton's second law of motion.

Atwood Machine
Fan Cart Physics
Free-Fall Laboratory

H.P.2B.2: Use a free-body diagram to represent the forces on an object.

Atwood Machine
Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pith Ball Lab

H.P.2B.5: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to support the Law of Conservation of Momentum in the context of two objects moving linearly (p=mv).

2D Collisions
Air Track

H.P.2B.8: Develop and use models (such as a computer simulation, drawing, or demonstration) and Newton's Second Law of Motion to construct explanations for why an object moving at a constant speed in a circle is accelerating.

Uniform Circular Motion

H.P.2C: The contact interactions among objects and their subsequent motion can be explained and predicted by analyzing the normal, tension, applied, and frictional forces acting on the objects and by applying Newton's Laws of Motion.

H.P.2C.1: Use a free-body diagram to represent the normal, tension (or elastic), applied, and frictional forces on an object.

Atwood Machine
Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pith Ball Lab

H.P.2C.4: Analyze and interpret data on force and displacement to determine the spring (or elastic) constant of an elastic material (Hooke's Law, F=-kx), including constructing an appropriate graph in order to draw a line-of-best-fit whose calculated slope will yield the spring constant, k.

Determining a Spring Constant

H.P.2D: The non-contact (at a distance) interactions among objects and their subsequent motion can be explained and predicted by analyzing the gravitational, electric, and magnetic forces acting on the objects and applying Newton's laws of motion. These non-contact forces can be represented as fields.

H.P.2D.2: Use mathematical and computational thinking to predict the relationships among the masses of two objects, the attractive gravitational force between them, and the distance between them (Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation, F=Gm1m2/r²).

Gravitational Force
Pith Ball Lab

H.P.2D.4: Use mathematical and computational thinking to predict the relationships among the charges of two particles, the attractive or repulsive electrical force between them, and the distance between them (Coulomb's Law. F=kq1q2/r²).

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

H.P.2D.5: Construct explanations for how the non-contact forces of gravity, electricity, and magnetism can be modeled as fields by sketching field diagrams for two given charges, two massive objects, or a bar magnet and use these diagrams to qualitatively interpret the direction and magnitude of the force at a particular location in the field.

Magnetic Induction

H.P.2D.6: Use a free-body diagram to represent the gravitational force on an object.

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pith Ball Lab

H.P.2D.7: Use a free-body diagram to represent the electrical force on a charge.

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

H.P.2D.9: Use Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation and Newton's second law of motion to explain why all objects near Earth's surface have the same acceleration.

Atwood Machine

H.P.3A: Work and energy are equivalent to each other. Work is defined as the product of displacement and the force causing that displacement; this results in the transfer of mechanical energy. Therefore, in the case of mechanical energy, energy is seen as the ability to do work. This is called the work-energy principle. The rate at which work is done (or energy is transformed) is called power. For machines that do useful work for humans, the ratio of useful power output is the efficiency of the machine. For all energies and in all instances, energy in a closed system remains constant.

H.P.3A.1: Use mathematical and computational thinking to determine the work done by a constant force (W=Fd).

Pulley Lab

H.P.3A.2: Use mathematical and computational thinking to analyze problems dealing with the work done on or by an object and its change in energy.

Pulley Lab

H.P.3A.3: Obtain information to communicate how energy is conserved in elastic and inelastic collisions.

2D Collisions

H.P.3B: Mechanical energy refers to a combination of motion (kinetic energy) and stored energy (potential energy). When only conservative forces act on an object and when no mass is converted to energy, mechanical energy is conserved. Gravitational and electrical potential energy can be modeled as energy stored in the fields created by massive objects or charged particles.

H.P.3B.1: Develop and use models (such as computer simulations, drawings, bar graphs, and diagrams) to exemplify the transformation of mechanical energy in simple systems and those with periodic motion and on which only conservative forces act.

Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Roller Coaster Physics

H.P.3B.2: Use mathematical and computational thinking to argue the validity of the conservation of mechanical energy in simple systems and those with periodic motion and on which only conservative forces act (KE = ½ mv², PEg = mgh, PEe = ½ kx²).

Air Track

H.P.3C: When there is a temperature difference between two objects, an interaction occurs in the form of a transfer of thermal energy (heat) from the hotter object to the cooler object. Thermal energy is the total internal kinetic energy of the molecules and/or atoms of a system and is related to temperature, which is the average kinetic energy of the particles of a system. Energy always flows from hot to cold through the processes of conduction, convection, or radiation.

H.P.3C.3: Develop and use models (such as a drawing or a small-scale greenhouse) to exemplify the energy balance of the Earth (including conduction, convection, and radiation).

Greenhouse Effect - Metric

H.P.3D: Sound is a mechanical, longitudinal wave that is the result of vibrations (kinetic energy) that transfer energy through a medium.

H.P.3D.4: Use mathematical and computational thinking to analyze problems that relate the frequency, period, amplitude, wavelength, velocity, and energy of sound waves.

Ripple Tank

H.P.3E: During electric circuit interactions, electrical energy (energy stored in a battery or energy transmitted by a current) is transformed into other forms of energy and transferred to circuit devices and the surroundings. Charged particles and magnets create fields that store energy. Magnetic fields exert forces on moving charged particles. Changing magnetic fields cause electrons in wires to move, creating current.

H.P.3E.1: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to determine the relationship between the current and potential drop (voltage) across an Ohmic resistor. Analyze and interpret data to verify Ohm's law, including constructing an appropriate graph in order to draw a line-of-best-fit whose calculated slope will yield R, the resistance of the resistor.

Circuits

H.P.3E.2: Develop and use models (such as circuit drawings and mathematical representations) to explain how an electric circuit works by tracing the path of the electrons and including concepts of energy transformation, transfer, and the conservation of energy and electric charge.

Circuit Builder

H.P.3E.5: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to determine how connecting resistors in series and in parallel affects the power (brightness) of light bulbs.

Circuit Builder
Circuits

H.P.3E.6: Obtain and communicate information about the relationship between magnetism and electric currents to explain the role of magnets and coils of wire in microphones, speakers, generators, and motors.

Electromagnetic Induction

H.P.3F: During radiant energy interactions, energy can be transferred over long distances without a medium. Radiation can be modeled as an electromagnetic wave or as a stream of discrete packets of energy (photons); all radiation travels at the same speed in a vacuum (speed of light). This electromagnetic radiation is a major source of energy for life on Earth.

H.P.3F.2: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to determine the interaction between the visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and various objects (including mirrors, lenses, barriers with two slits, and diffraction gratings) and to construct explanations of the behavior of light (reflection, refraction, transmission, interference) in these instances using models (including ray diagrams).

Basic Prism
Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)
Refraction

H.P.3F.3: Use drawings to exemplify the behavior of light passing from one transparent medium to another and construct explanations for this behavior.

Basic Prism

H.P.3F.4: Use mathematical and computational thinking to analyze problems that relate the frequency, period, amplitude, wavelength, velocity, and energy of light.

Ripple Tank

H.P.3G: Nuclear energy is energy stored in an atom's nucleus; this energy holds the atom together and is called binding energy. Binding energy is a reflection of the equivalence of mass and energy; the mass of any nucleus is always less than the sum of the masses of the individual constituent nucleons that comprise it. Binding energy is also a measure of the strong nuclear force that exists in the nucleus and is responsible for overcoming the repulsive forces among protons. The strong and weak nuclear forces, gravity, and the electromagnetic force are the fundamental forces in nature. Strong and weak nuclear forces determine nuclear sizes, stability, and rates of radioactive decay. At the subatomic scale, the conservation of energy becomes the conservation of mass-energy.

H.P.3G.1: Develop and use models to represent the basic structure of an atom (including protons, neutrons, electrons, and the nucleus).

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Element Builder

H.P.3G.4: Use mathematical and computational thinking to predict the products of radioactive decay (including alpha, beta, and gamma decay).

Nuclear Decay

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.