6.S.1A: The practices of science and engineering support the development of science concepts, develop the habits of mind that are necessary for scientific thinking, and allow students to engage in science in ways that are similar to those used by scientists and engineers.

6.S.1A.1: Ask questions to

6.S.1A.1.1: generate hypotheses for scientific investigations,

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

6.S.1A.1.2: refine models, explanations, or designs, or

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Trebuchet

6.S.1A.1.3: extend the results of investigations or challenge claims.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

6.S.1A.2: Develop, use, and refine models to

6.S.1A.2.1: understand or represent phenomena, processes, and relationships,

 3D Eclipse
 Food Chain
 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases
 Phase Changes
 Seasons in 3D
 Waves

6.S.1A.2.2: test devices or solutions, or

 Circuits
 Trebuchet

6.S.1A.2.3: communicate ideas to others.

 Ocean Mapping
 Waves
 Weather Maps

6.S.1A.3: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to answer questions, test hypotheses, and develop explanations:

6.S.1A.3.1: formulate scientific questions and testable hypotheses,

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Real-Time Histogram
 Seed Germination
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

6.S.1A.3.2: identify materials, procedures, and variables,

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

6.S.1A.3.3: select and use appropriate tools or instruments to collect qualitative and quantitative data, and

 Triple Beam Balance

6.S.1A.3.4: record and represent data in an appropriate form. Use appropriate safety procedures.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram

6.S.1A.4: Analyze and interpret data from informational texts, observations, measurements, or investigations using a range of methods (such as tabulation, graphing, or statistical analysis) to

6.S.1A.4.1: reveal patterns and construct meaning or

 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Seed Germination

6.S.1A.4.2: support hypotheses, explanations, claims, or designs.

 Disease Spread
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Seed Germination

6.S.1A.5: Use mathematical and computational thinking to

6.S.1A.5.1: use and manipulate appropriate metric units,

 Unit Conversions

6.S.1A.5.2: collect and analyze data,

 Estimating Population Size
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Plants and Snails
 Time Estimation

6.S.1A.5.3: express relationships between variables for models and investigations, or

 Food Chain
 Force and Fan Carts
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock

6.S.1A.5.4: use grade-level appropriate statistics to analyze data.

 Describing Data Using Statistics
 Time Estimation

6.S.1A.6: Construct explanations of phenomena using

6.S.1A.6.1: primary or secondary scientific evidence and models,

 Gravity Pitch
 Phase Changes

6.S.1A.6.2: conclusions from scientific investigations,

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume

6.S.1A.6.4: data communicated in graphs, tables, or diagrams.

 3D Eclipse
 Identifying Nutrients
 Ocean Tides
 Pond Ecosystem
 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

6.S.1A.7: Construct and analyze scientific arguments to support claims, explanations, or designs using evidence from observations, data, or informational texts.

 2D Eclipse
 Gravity Pitch
 Plants and Snails

6.S.1A.8: Obtain and evaluate scientific information to

6.S.1A.8.4: evaluate hypotheses, explanations, claims, or designs or

 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Seed Germination

6.S.1A.8.A: Communicate using the conventions and expectations of scientific writing or oral presentations by

6.S.1A.8.A.2: reporting the results of student experimental investigations.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume

6.S.1B: Technology is any modification to the natural world created to fulfill the wants and needs of humans. The engineering design process involves a series of iterative steps used to solve a problem and often leads to the development of a new or improved technology.

6.S.1B.1: Construct devices or design solutions using scientific knowledge to solve specific problems or needs:

6.S.1B.1.4: build and test devices or solutions,

 Trebuchet

6.S.1B.1.5: determine if the devices or solutions solved the problem and refine the design if needed, and

 Trebuchet

6.S.1B.1.6: communicate the results.

 Trebuchet

6.E.2A: Earth's atmosphere, an envelope of gases that surround the planet, makes conditions on Earth suitable for living things and influences weather. Water is always moving between the atmosphere (troposphere) and the surface of Earth as a result of the force of gravity and energy from the Sun. The Sun is the driving energy source for heating Earth and for the circulation of Earth's atmosphere.

6.E.2A.3: Construct explanations of the processes involved in the cycling of water through Earth's systems (including transpiration, evaporation, condensation and crystallization, precipitation, and downhill flow of water on land).

 Water Cycle

6.E.2B: The complex patterns of changes and movement of water in the atmosphere determined by winds, landforms, ocean temperatures and currents, and convection are major determinants of local weather patterns and climate. Technology has enhanced our ability to measure and predict weather patterns.

6.E.2B.1: Analyze and interpret data from weather conditions (including wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, cloud types, and air pressure), weather maps, satellites, and radar to predict local weather patterns and conditions.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds
 Hurricane Motion
 Weather Maps

6.E.2B.2: Develop and use models to explain how relationships between the movement and interactions of air masses, high and low pressure systems, and frontal boundaries result in weather conditions and storms (including thunderstorms, hurricanes and tornadoes).

 Coastal Winds and Clouds
 Hurricane Motion

6.E.2B.3: Develop and use models to represent how solar energy and convection impact Earth's weather patterns and climate conditions (including global winds, the jet stream, and ocean currents).

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

6.E.2B.4: Construct explanations for how climate is determined in an area (including latitude, elevation, shape of the land, distance from water, global winds, and ocean currents).

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons: Why do we have them?

6.P.3A: Energy manifests itself in multiple forms, such as mechanical (kinetic energy and potential energy), electrical, chemical, radiant (solar), and thermal energy. According to the principle of conservation of energy, energy cannot be created nor destroyed, but it can be transferred from one place to another and transformed between systems.

6.P.3A.1: Analyze and interpret data to describe the properties and compare sources of different forms of energy (including mechanical, electrical, chemical, radiant, and thermal).

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Potential Energy on Shelves

6.P.3A.2: Develop and use models to exemplify the conservation of energy as it is transformed from kinetic to potential (gravitational and elastic) and vice versa.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Sled Wars

6.P.3A.3: Construct explanations for how energy is conserved as it is transferred and transformed in electrical circuits.

 Energy Conversions

6.P.3A.5: Develop and use models to describe and compare the directional transfer of heat through convection, radiation, and conduction.

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Absorption
 Heat Transfer by Conduction
 Herschel Experiment
 Radiation

6.P.3A.6: Design and test devices that minimize or maximize heat transfer by conduction, convection, or radiation.

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Absorption
 Heat Transfer by Conduction
 Herschel Experiment
 Radiation

6.P.3B: Energy transfer occurs when two objects interact thereby exerting force on each other. It is the property of an object or a system that enables it to do work (force moving an object over a distance). Machines are governed by this application of energy, work, and conservation of energy.

6.P.3B.1: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to provide evidence for how the design of simple machines (including levers, pulleys, inclined planes) helps transfer mechanical energy by reducing the amount of force required to do work.

 Ants on a Slant (Inclined Plane)
 Homeostasis
 Levers
 Pulley Lab

6.P.3B.2: Design and test solutions that improve the efficiency of a machine by reducing the input energy (effort) or the amount of energy transferred to the surrounding environment as it moves an object.

 Sled Wars

6.L.4A: Life is the quality that differentiates living things (organisms) from nonliving objects or those that were once living. All organisms are made up of cells, need food and water, a way to dispose of waste, and an environment in which they can live. Because of the diversity of life on Earth, scientists have developed a way to organize groups of organisms according to their characteristic traits, making it easier to identify and study them.

6.L.4A.1: Obtain and communicate information to support claims that living organisms

6.L.4A.1.1: obtain and use resources for energy,

 Food Chain

6.L.4A.1.2: respond to stimuli,

 Human Homeostasis
 Paramecium Homeostasis

6.L.4A.1.3: reproduce, and

 Flower Pollination

6.L.4B: The Animal Kingdom includes a diversity of organisms that have many characteristics in common. Classification of animals is based on structures that function in growth, reproduction, and survival. Animals have both structural and behavioral adaptations that increase the chances of reproduction and survival in changing environments.

6.L.4B.2: Obtain and communicate information to explain how the structural adaptations and processes of animals allow for defense, movement, or resource obtainment.

 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

6.L.4B.5: Analyze and interpret data to compare how endothermic and ectothermic animals respond to changes in environmental temperature.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

6.L.5A: The Protist Kingdom is one of the most diverse groups and includes organisms that have characteristics similar to but are not classified as plants, animals, or fungi. These microorganisms live in moist environments and vary in how they obtain energy and move. The Fungi Kingdom consists of organisms that do not make their own food (heterotrophs) but obtain their nutrition through external absorption. Fungi can be grouped by their growth habit or fruiting structure and respond to changes in the environmental stimuli similar to plants.

6.L.5A.1: Analyze and interpret data from observations to compare how the structures of protists (including euglena, paramecium, and amoeba) and fungi allow them to obtain energy and explore their environment.

 Paramecium Homeostasis

6.L.5A.2: Analyze and interpret data to describe how fungi respond to external stimuli (including temperature, light, touch, water, and gravity).

 Paramecium Homeostasis

6.L.5B: The Plant Kingdom consists of organisms that primarily make their own food (autotrophs) and are commonly classified based on internal structures that function in the transport of food and water. Plants have structural and behavioral adaptations that increase the chances of reproduction and survival in changing environments.

6.L.5B.2: Analyze and interpret data to explain how the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration work together to meet the needs of plants.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Photosynthesis Lab
 Plants and Snails

6.L.5B.5: Analyze and interpret data to describe how plants respond to external stimuli (including temperature, light, touch, water, and gravity).

 Seed Germination

Correlation last revised: 3/31/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.