B.1: Cellular Chemistry

B.1.3: Explain and give examples of how the function and differentiation of cells is influenced by their external environment (e.g., temperature, acidity and the concentration of certain molecules) and changes in these conditions may affect how a cell functions.

 Paramecium Homeostasis

B.2: Cellular Structure

B.2.2: Describe the structure of a cell membrane and explain how it regulates the transport of materials into and out of the cell and prevents harmful materials from entering the cell.

 Cell Structure
 Osmosis

B.2.3: Explain that most cells contain mitochondria (the key sites of cellular respiration), where stored chemical energy is converted into useable energy for the cell. Explain that some cells, including many plant cells, contain chloroplasts (the key sites of photosynthesis) where the energy of light is captured for use in chemical work.

 Cell Energy Cycle

B.2.4: Explain that all cells contain ribosomes (the key sites for protein synthesis), where genetic material is decoded in order to form unique proteins.

 RNA and Protein Synthesis

B.2.6: Investigate a variety of different cell types and relate the proportion of different organelles within these cells to their functions.

 Paramecium Homeostasis
 RNA and Protein Synthesis

B.3: Matter Cycles and Energy Transfer

B.3.1: Describe how some organisms capture the sunÂ?s energy through the process of photosynthesis by converting carbon dioxide and water into high-energy compounds and releasing oxygen.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Photosynthesis Lab
 Pond Ecosystem

B.3.2: Describe how most organisms can combine and recombine the elements contained in sugar molecules into a variety of biologically essential compounds by utilizing the energy from cellular respiration.

 Cell Energy Cycle

B.3.3: Recognize and describe that metabolism consists of all of the biochemical reactions that occur inside cells, which include the production, modification, transport, and exchange of materials that are required for the maintenance of life.

 Cell Structure

B.3.4: Describe how matter cycles through an ecosystem by way of food chains and food webs and how organisms convert that matter into a variety of organic molecules to be used in part in their own cellular structures.

 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem

B.4: Interdependence

B.4.1: Explain that the amount of life environments can support is limited by the available energy, water, oxygen and minerals and by the ability of ecosystems to recycle the remains of dead organisms.

 Food Chain

B.4.2: Describe how human activities and natural phenomena can change the flow and of matter and energy in an ecosystem and how those changes impact other species.

 Carbon Cycle

B.4.3: Describe the consequences of introducing non-native species into an ecosystem and identify the impact it may have on that ecosystem.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

B.4.4: Describe how climate, the pattern of matter and energy flow, the birth and death of new organisms, and the interaction between those organisms contribute to the long-term stability of an ecosystem.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Food Chain

B.5: Molecular Basis of Heredity

B.5.1: Describe the relationship between chromosomes and DNA along with their basic structure and function.

 Human Karyotyping

B.5.2: Describe how hereditary information passed from parents to offspring is encoded in the regions of DNA molecules called genes.

 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

B.5.4: Explain how the unique shape and activity of each protein is determined by the sequence of its amino acids.

 RNA and Protein Synthesis

B.5.6: Recognize that traits can be structural, physiological or behavioral and can include readily observable characteristics at the organismal level or less recognizable features at the molecular and cellular level.

 Chicken Genetics
 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

B.6: Cellular Reproduction

B.6.1: Describe the process of mitosis and explain that this process ordinarily results in daughter cells with a genetic make-up identical to the parent cells.

 Cell Division

B.7: Genetics

B.7.1: Distinguish between dominant and recessive alleles and determine the phenotype that would result from the different possible combinations of alleles in an offspring.

 Chicken Genetics
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

B.7.2: Describe dominant, recessive, codominant, sex-linked, incompletely dominant, multiply allelic and polygenic traits and illustrate their inheritance patterns over multiple generations.

 Chicken Genetics
 Human Karyotyping
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

B.7.3: Determine the likelihood of the appearance of a specific trait in an offspring given the genetic make-up of the parents.

 Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
 Microevolution
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

B.7.4: Explain the process by which a cell copies its DNA and identify factors that can damage DNA and cause changes in its nucleotide sequence.

 Building DNA

B.8: Evolution

B.8.5: Describe how organisms with beneficial traits are more likely to survive, reproduce, and pass on their genetic information due to genetic variations, environmental forces and reproductive pressures.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Microevolution
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

B.8.6: Explain how genetic variation within a population (i.e., a species) can be attributed to mutations as well as random assortments of existing genes.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection

Correlation last revised: 4/4/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.