1: Kinematics

1.1: Introducing Vector Quantities

1.1.3: use vectors to represent position, displacement, velocity, and acceleration

1.1.3.a: define scalar and vector quantity

 Golf Range
 Shoot the Monkey

1.1.3.b: distinguish between (among): clock reading and time interval; distance, position, and displacement; speed, velocity, and acceleration; fixed frame of reference and moving frame of reference

 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Golf Range
 Shoot the Monkey

1.1.3.c: perform basic calculations to distinguish between average speed and average velocity

 Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs

1.2: Graphical and Algebraic Problem Solving

1.2.3: analyse and describe vertical motion as it applies to kinematics

 Free-Fall Laboratory

1.3: Vector Analysis

1.3.1: use vectors to represent position, displacement, velocity, and acceleration

1.3.1.b: add and subtract all vectors graphically

 Adding Vectors
 Vectors

2: Dynamics

2.1: Dynamics Introduction

2.1.1: explain how a major scientific milestone revolutionized thinking in dynamics

2.1.1.a: explain Galileo?s concept of inertia

 Fan Cart Physics

2.1.1.b: explain the meaning of inertial mass and gravitational mass

 Fan Cart Physics
 Gravitational Force
 Pith Ball Lab

2.1.2: use vectors to represent forces

2.1.2.c: draw free-body diagrams representing contact and noncontact forces (Fn, Ff, Fa, Fg)

 Coulomb Force (Static)
 Pith Ball Lab

2.2: Newton?s Laws

2.2.1: use vectors to represent forces

2.2.1.b: perform computations involving friction, normal force, and the coefficient of friction in one dimension

 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

2.2.2: design an experiment, identifying and controlling major variables

2.2.2.a: design an experiment to determine the coefficient of static and kinetic friction

 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

2.2.2.b: design an experiment to explore kinetic friction and contact area.

 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

2.2.3: apply Newton?s laws of motion to explain inertia; the relationships among force, mass, and acceleration; and the interaction of forces between two objects

2.2.3.b: apply Newton?s second law to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the relationships among force, mass, and acceleration in one dimension

 Atwood Machine
 Fan Cart Physics

2.2.4: evaluate and select appropriate instruments for collecting evidence, and appropriate processes for problem solving, inquiring, and decision making

 Triple Beam Balance

2.2.6: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data

 Triple Beam Balance

2.2.9: apply Newton?s laws of motion to explain inertia; the relationships among force, mass, and acceleration; and the interaction of forces between two objects

2.2.9.a: apply Newton?s third law to identify action-reaction forces between two objects

 Fan Cart Physics

2.2.9.b: apply Newton?s third law to calculations involving two objects acting in one dimension

 Fan Cart Physics

2.3: Momentum Introduction

2.3.1: apply Newton?s laws of motion to explain inertia; the relationships among force, mass, and acceleration; and the interaction of forces between two objects

2.3.1.a: define linear momentum

 2D Collisions
 Air Track

2.3.1.c: apply impulse-momentum theorem in problem situations

 2D Collisions
 Air Track

3: Momentum and Energy

3.1: Technological Implications

3.1.4: explain the importance of using appropriate language and conventions when describing events related to momentum and energy

 2D Collisions
 Roller Coaster Physics

3.2: Work, Power, and Efficiency

3.2.1: analyse quantitatively the relationships among force, displacement, and work

 Pulley Lab

3.2.2: analyse common energy transformation situations using the closed system work-energy theorem

3.2.2.c: define gravitational potential (Eg)

 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Potential Energy on Shelves
 Roller Coaster Physics

3.2.2.d: analyse potential energy transformations (gravitational) related to the closed system work-energy theorem

 Pulley Lab

3.2.3: analyse quantitatively the relationships among work, time, and power

 Pulley Lab

3.2.5: design an experiment identifying and controlling major variables

 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram

3.2.7: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data

 Triple Beam Balance

3.3: Transformation, Total Energy, and Conservation

3.3.1: describe quantitatively mechanical energy as the sum of kinetic and potential energies

3.3.1.a: distinguish between conservative and nonconservative forces

 Air Track

3.3.1.b: solve problems using the law of conservation of mechanical energy involving:

3.3.1.b.1: gravitational potential / kinetic

 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

3.3.1.b.3: all three forms of mechanical energy combined

 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

3.3.3: analyse quantitatively the relationships among mass, height, speed, and heat energy using the law of conservation of energy

3.3.3.b: using the law of conservation of energy, solve problems that include changes in gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy

 Air Track

3.3.3.c: explain the role of friction and the loss of mechanical energy from a system

 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

3.3.6: distinguish between problems that can be solved by the application of physics-related technologies and those that cannot

 Electromagnetic Induction

3.4: Conservation of Momentum

3.4.2: apply quantitatively the laws of conservation of momentum to one dimensional collisions and explosions

 Air Track

4: Waves

4.1: Fundamental Properties

4.1.1: formulate operational definitions of major variables

 Refraction
 Ripple Tank
 Sound Beats and Sine Waves

4.1.2: describe the production, characteristics, and behaviours of longitudinal and transverse mechanical waves

 Longitudinal Waves
 Ripple Tank
 Sound Beats and Sine Waves

4.1.3: apply the wave equation to explain and predict the behaviour of waves

 Ripple Tank

4.1.4: explain qualitatively and quantitatively the phenomena of wave interference, diffraction, reflection, and refraction, and the Doppler-Fizeau effect

4.1.4.a: explain the principle of superposition

 Ripple Tank
 Sound Beats and Sine Waves

4.1.4.b: explain how standing waves are formed

 Longitudinal Waves
 Ripple Tank

4.1.9: analyse society?s influence on scientific and technological endeavours

 DNA Fingerprint Analysis

4.1.12: apply the laws of reflection and the laws of refraction to predict wave behaviour

 Basic Prism
 Ripple Tank

4.1.13: hypothesize about wave behaviour, using available evidence and background information

 Ripple Tank

4.2: Sound Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation

4.2.1: compare and describe the properties of electromagnetic radiation and sound

 Ripple Tank

4.2.2: describe how sound and electromagnetic radiation, as forms of energy, are produced and transmitted

4.2.2.b: describe how sound and electromagnetic radiation are transmitted

 Longitudinal Waves

4.2.2.c: list the factors upon which the speed of sound depends

 Longitudinal Waves

4.2.3: apply the laws of reflection and the laws of refraction to predict wave behaviour

4.2.3.a: explain qualitatively and quantitatively the beat frequency resulting from the interference of two sources of slightly different frequency

 Ripple Tank
 Sound Beats and Sine Waves

4.2.3.c: explain how standing waves are produced from resonance in closed and open air columns

 Longitudinal Waves

4.2.3.d: perform calculations involving wavelength, frequency, speed, and column length for open and closed air columns

 Ripple Tank

4.2.4: explain qualitatively and quantitatively the phenomena of wave interference, diffraction, reflection, and refraction, and the Doppler-Fizeau effect

4.2.4.a: explain the Doppler effect and sonic booms

 Doppler Shift
 Doppler Shift Advanced

4.2.4.b: explain the phenomenon of the sonic boom, describe the problems it causes, and explain how such problems can be minimized

 Longitudinal Waves
 Refraction
 Ripple Tank
 Sound Beats and Sine Waves

4.2.4.c: explain how sound is reflected, and the process of echolocation

 Longitudinal Waves
 Ripple Tank

4.2.4.d: explain the law of reflection

 Longitudinal Waves
 Ripple Tank

4.2.4.e: explain quantitatively and qualitatively the refraction of light, index of refraction, Snell?s law, critical angle, and total internal reflection

 Basic Prism
 Refraction

Content correlation last revised: 5/4/2011

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below to go to the Gizmo Details page.