A: Handling chemicals safely, whether at home or in the workplace, requires an understanding of the properties of pure substances and mixtures. Students actively investigate the properties of a variety of matter, including mixtures and solutions, and elements and compounds encountered in everyday life. The atom as the basic building block of matter is introduced. Students also investigate the classification of elements on the periodic table.

A.1: classify various forms of matter, including commonly used household substances, on the basis of their properties and relate theses properties to their safe use, storage and disposal

A.1.5: apply the particle model of matter to explain the physical properties of the phases of matter

Phase Changes
Temperature and Particle Motion

A.2: describe solutions and solubility, solutes and solvents and describe how these concepts are applied to the production of prepared foods and useful materials

A.2.1: define solute, solvent, solution and solubility

Solubility and Temperature

A.2.4: describe examples of the effect of temperature change on solubility and explain this effect on the basis of the particle model of matter (e.g., concentration of brines for pickling and syrups for canning)

Solubility and Temperature

A.2.6: describe, in general terms, the pH scale as an indicator of acidity or basicity (e.g.., a pH of less than 7 indicates an acid, a pH of greater than 7 indicates a base)

pH Analysis
pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

A.4: ask questions about the relationships among observable variables and conduct investigations to address those questions

A.4.1: answer questions about science-related problems

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A.4.3: identify the major variables related to an investigation/experiment

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

A.4.4: carry out investigations/experiments

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Seed Germination
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A.4.5: use appropriate methods and tools to collect data and information (e.g., separate a mixture using standard techniques, such as filtration and evaporation).

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

A.5: conduct investigations into the relationships among observations and gather and record data

A.5.1: perform experiments and/or conduct investigations (e.g., investigate properties such as physical appearance, density, solubility, magnetism and melting point of sample materials in the laboratory)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Seed Germination
Sight vs. Sound Reactions
Solubility and Temperature

A.5.2: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or experiment (e.g., prepare a chart that describes the properties of common household solutions and lists procedures for their safe use, storage and disposal)

Diffusion
Seed Germination

A.6: examine data and develop and assess possible explanations

A.6.2: state a possible conclusion based on experimental data and explain how the evidence gathered supports or refutes the initial prediction.

Photosynthesis

A.12: demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility when pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and the requirements for a sustainable environment (e.g., evaluate the long-term impact of waste disposal, such as paints and cleaning solutions, on the environment and the quality of life of living organisms)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

B: Energy can be transferred by heat and by the use of force or distance multipliers called machines. The optimal design of such technologies is based upon an understanding of energy transfer, heat, temperature and force. Students understand that the design of energy transfer technologies takes into consideration the need for safety and for efficiency as a means of reducing reliance upon nonrenewable energy resources.

B.1: examine how natural and technological cooling and heating systems are based on the transfer of thermal energy (heat) from hot to cold objects

B.1.2: describe the three ways (e.g.., radiation, convection and conduction) thermal energy transfers from warmer to cooler objects

Herschel Experiment - Metric

B.1.4: describe the particle model of matter, in which every object consists of particles in motion, and describe the effect of temperature on this motion (e.g., observe Brownian motion)

Temperature and Particle Motion

B.3: describe and compare simple machines as devices that transfer energy and multiply forces or distances

B.3.1: describe simple machines as devices that transfer energy (e.g., screws, ramps, hammers, hockey sticks, tennis rackets)

Pulley Lab

B.3.2: describe simple machines as either force multipliers or distance multipliers

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pulley Lab

B.4: ask questions about the relationships among observable variables and conduct investigations to address those questions

B.4.1: identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., investigate common machines, such as automobile jacks, can and bottle openers, meat grinders, bicycles and ramps, that change the direction, speed or magnitude of a force)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

B.4.3: conduct an experiment and identify the major variables.

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Seed Germination

B.5: conduct investigations into the relationships among observations and gather and record data

B.5.1: use instruments effectively and accurately to collect data (e.g., collect data on daily household energy consumption by recording electricity and gas meter readings over a two-week period, organize and display data)

Triple Beam Balance

B.6: examine data and develop and assess possible explanations

B.6.1: examine patterns and trends in data and explain possible relationships among the major variables (e.g., suggest possible reasons for daily fluctuations in domestic energy consumption)

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

B.6.2: identify potential applications of findings (e.g., perform an experiment to investigate how well various materials insulate, graph temperature changes)

Pendulum Clock

B.6.3: test and evaluate designs and prototypes in terms of function, reliability, safety, efficiency, use of materials and impact on the environment (e.g., test insulating materials and methods, determine the efficiency of a machine).

Trebuchet

B.7: work collaboratively on problems and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

B.7.2: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., draw diagrams that show the differences between particles in solids, liquids and gases; communicate using the terms thermal energy and temperature).

Identifying Nutrients

B.12: demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility when pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and the requirements for a sustainable environment (e.g., promote actions and technologies that are not injurious to the environment; consider the impact of technology and weigh scientific, technological and ecological factors)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

C: Life processes require the exchange of matter between living systems and the external environment. Students investigate life processes at the organism and system level. In closely studying the digestive and circulatory systems, students understand that a healthy diet and lifestyle is crucial to their wellness.

C.1: examine, in general terms, the exchange of matter by the digestive and circulatory systems, the functional relationship between the two systems and the need for a healthy diet and lifestyle

C.1.6: examine the intake and processing of matter by the digestive system (e.g., foods are broken down into molecules that are absorbed into the blood stream from the intestine, food intake leads to increased blood sugar and mineral levels)

Digestive System

C.1.7: describe, in general terms, the role of the heart and lungs in the circulatory system and in the exchange and distribution of matter processed by the digestive system

Circulatory System
Digestive System

C.2: examine disorders of the digestive and circulatory systems induced by genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors

C.2.1: describe, in general terms, how the digestive and circulatory systems interact to assist in the maintenance of balance (homeostasis) in the human organism

Circulatory System

C.3: describe, in general terms, the structure and function of plant and animal cell parts

C.3.1: examine the structure of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall

Cell Energy Cycle
RNA and Protein Synthesis

C.4: identify and compare, in general terms, the life functions common to living systems, from cells to organ systems

C.4.1: examine the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of biological energy storage (e.g., capture of energy from the sun in glucose during photosynthesis and the release of energy from glucose during cellular respiration)

Cell Energy Cycle
Photosynthesis

C.4.3: identify the organs and systems in plants and animals that perform life functions

Circulatory System
Digestive System

C.4.4: identify the major human organ systems that perform critical life functions (e.g., energy conversion, response to the environment, growth, reproduction, conservation or dissipation of thermal energy)

Circulatory System
Digestive System
Human Homeostasis
Paramecium Homeostasis

C.4.6: identify the role of modern technology in monitoring critical life functions in humans (e.g., ultrasound, heart monitor, blood pressure cuff, blood glucose monitoring devices).

Human Karyotyping

C.5: ask questions about relationships among observable variables and conduct investigations to address those questions

C.5.2: identify questions arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., conduct a search, using a wide variety of electronic sources, when investigating technology used to monitor critical life functions)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

C.5.4: identify the variables related to an investigation or experiment.

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Seed Germination

C.6: conduct investigations into the relationships among observations and gather and record data

C.6.1: conduct procedures, controlling the major variables (e.g., identify the manipulated, responding and controlled variables for an experimental investigation of the effect of exercise on heart rate)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

C.7: examine data and develop and assess possible explanations

C.7.3: identify new questions and problems that arise from what was learned (e.g., ?How do water and dissolved materials move in living plant and animal cells??).

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

C.8: work collaboratively on problems and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

C.8.2: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., research the physiological basis of a specific disorder in one of the systems studied; present this information to peers, or in a document, using style sheets and with attention to word-processing techniques)

Identifying Nutrients

C.13: demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility when pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and the requirements for a sustainable environment (e.g., consider all perspectives when addressing issues; weigh scientific, technological and ecological factors)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D: Energy from the Sun sustains living systems and maintains equilibrium in the biosphere. In the biosphere, matter is recycled along natural pathways. Students learn, however, that increasing human population, human activity, use of energy and reliance on manufactured materials are having an impact on the movement of energy in the biosphere. This raises global concerns about sustainability.

D.1: examine how the flow of matter in the biosphere is cyclical along characteristic pathways and can be disrupted by human activity

D.1.1: examine natural food chains, food webs and energy pyramids

Forest Ecosystem

D.1.5: compare the recycling of matter by society with the natural cycling of matter through ecosystems

Cell Energy Cycle

D.1.7: identify the needs and interests of society that have led to technologies with unforeseen environmental consequences (e.g., fishing technologies that result in harvesting rates that are higher than reproduction rates, use of pesticides such as DDT, impact of automobile emissions on atmospheric composition)

DNA Analysis

D.2: examine a local ecosystem in terms of its biotic and abiotic components and describe the factors that maintain its equilibrium

D.2.2: define ecosystems in terms of biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., common plants and animals, latitude, altitude, topography)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D.2.3: examine how various abiotic factors influence biodiversity in an ecosystem (e.g., climate, substrate, temperature, elevation)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D.2.4: explain how various factors influence the size of populations (e.g., immigration, emigration, birth rate and death rate, food supply, predation, disease, number of offspring produced, climate change)

Food Chain

D.2.5: examine how interactions among organisms limit populations (e.g., predation, parasitism, competition)

Food Chain

D.2.6: examine the relationship between land-use practices and altering ecosystems (e.g., swamp drainage, slash-and-burn forestry, agriculture)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D.3: ask questions about relationships among observable variables and conduct investigations to address those questions

D.3.1: identify questions arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., develop questions related to recycling, ozone thinning)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

D.3.2: identify the manipulated, responding and controlled variables (e.g., investigate the amount of waste materials produced by a school or family on a daily or weekly basis)

Pendulum Clock

D.3.3: select appropriate methods and tools to collect data and information to solve problems (e.g., conduct a search for environmental projects, using a wide variety of electronic sources).

Estimating Population Size
Pendulum Clock
Triple Beam Balance

D.4: conduct investigations into the relationships among observations and gather and record data

D.4.1: conduct procedures, controlling the major variables (e.g., perform experiments to demonstrate that cellular respiration releases thermal energy)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

D.4.2: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or experiment (e.g., review the data collected in an ecosystem study and present this information in a written or graphic format or in an oral presentation to peers)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Seed Germination

D.5: examine data and develop and assess possible explanations

D.5.1: compile and display data, by hand or computer, in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, bar graphs, line graphs

Identifying Nutrients

D.5.4: identify new questions and problems that arise from what was learned (e.g., ?Should there be more controls on bringing live animals and plants to Canada and other countries?? ?How can we reduce the amount of household wastes??).

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

D.6: work collaboratively on problems and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

D.6.2: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., represent the movement of matter and energy in an ecosystem, using food chains, food webs or pyramids, and communicate this information in the form of a graphic illustration)

Identifying Nutrients

D.11: demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility when pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and the requirements for a sustainable environment (e.g., examine their personal role in the preservation of the environment, make a personal decision based on feelings of responsibility toward less privileged parts of the global community and towards future generations)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.