A: Biological diversity is reflected in the range of species found in local and global environments and by subtle variations in characteristics found within individual species. In this unit, students learn that diversity is maintained through natural processes of sexual and asexual reproduction, though the survival of individual species?and variations within those species?may be influenced by ecological and human-caused factors. Students examine trends toward loss of diversity and examine related issues concerning environmental quality and the impact of technologies.

A.1: investigate and examine diversity within and among species, the importance of diversity and the various environments in which species live

A.1.1: investigate biological diversity within and among species, including humans

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

A.1.2: define community, population, habitat and niche and relate them to diversity within and among species

Food Chain
Rabbit Population by Season

A.1.3: recognize that species are dependent on others and their environment

Food Chain

A.2: examine the nature of reproductive processes and their role in transmitting species characteristics

A.2.1: distinguish between asexual and sexual reproduction and identify examples of asexual (e.g., fission in the amoeba, budding in the hydra) and sexual reproduction (e.g., cross-fertilization in seed plants, sexual reproduction in mammals)

Pollination: Flower to Fruit

A.2.2: examine how inherited traits influence diversity and survival within and among species

Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)
Natural Selection
Rainfall and Bird Beaks - Metric

A.2.3: distinguish those characteristics that can be inherited from those that cannot (e.g., recognize that eye colour is inherited but scars are not)

Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

A.2.4: identify and distinguish between examples of natural and artificial selection (e.g., evolution of beak shapes in birds versus development of milk production in dairy cows)

Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
Microevolution
Natural Selection
Rainfall and Bird Beaks - Metric

A.6: apply science-related analyzing and interpreting skills to examine data and develop and assess possible explanations at home, in the workplace and in the community

A.6.1: interpret patterns in data and explain relationships among the variables (e.g., examine data on changing animal populations)

Pendulum Clock

A.7: apply science-related communication and teamwork skills to work collaboratively on problems and use appropriate language and formats to communicate procedures and results at home, in the workplace and in the community

A.7.1: communicate questions, ideas, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means

Identifying Nutrients

A.7.2: evaluate individual and group processes used when investigating an issue.

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock

A.10: value and use scientific methods to carefully gather evidence when investigating problems and issues (e.g., critically consider ideas and perceptions, recognizing that the obvious is not always correct)

Estimating Population Size

B: Different materials have different properties. In this unit, students are introduced to the formal study of chemical substances through laboratory investigations and introductory studies of chemical theory. In the laboratory, students observe and compare chemical substances and, following safety procedures, investigate the properties of materials and the ways they interact. In conjunction with these studies, students are introduced to ideas about elements and compounds and corresponding structural ideas about atoms and molecules. A general introduction to the periodic table, chemical nomenclature and simplified ways of representing chemical reactions are included.

B.2: describe patterns in chemical reactions

B.2.2: describe evidence of chemical change in reactions between familiar materials, by:

B.2.2.1: describing combustion and corrosion

Chemical Equations

B.2.2.2: observing various chemical reactions

Chemical Changes

B.2.3: describe the main differences between physical and chemical changes (e.g., change of state, the creation of odour, new products, and temperature change)

Chemical Changes

B.3: describe ideas used when interpreting the chemical nature of matter

B.3.1: apply the particle model of matter to explain the states of matter

Phase Changes

B.3.2: recognize the periodic table as a tool used to display and organize elements according to their properties (e.g., metals and nonmetals, reactivity)

Electron Configuration

B.3.3: describe the parts of an atom (e.g., neutrons, protons and electrons)

Element Builder

B.4: apply simplified chemical nomenclature when describing elements, compounds and chemical reactions

B.4.1: identify reactants and products in simple chemical reactions

Chemical Equations
Equilibrium and Concentration

B.4.3: describe familiar chemical reactions by using word equations and chemical formulas and by constructing models of reactants and products (e.g., describe combustion reactions, such as carbon + oxygen = carbon dioxide [C + O2 = CO2]).

Chemical Equations
Equilibrium and Concentration

B.5: apply science-related initiating and planning skills to ask questions about the relationships among observable variables at home, in the workplace and in the community

B.5.1: define questions and problems to facilitate investigations

Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

B.6: apply science-related performing and recording skills to conduct investigations into the relationships among observations and gather and record data at home, in the workplace and in the community

B.6.1: conduct procedures, controlling the major variables

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

B.6.2: use appropriate methods and tools to collect data and information to solving problems (e.g., conduct a search for information about chemical elements, using appropriate print and electronic sources)

Triple Beam Balance

B.7: apply science-related analyzing and interpreting skills to examine data and develop and assess possible explanations at home, in the workplace and in the community

B.7.1: display data, by hand or computer, in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, and bar graphs

Identifying Nutrients

B.7.3: state a conclusion, based on experimental data

Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock

B.11: value and use scientific methods to carefully gather evidence when investigating problems and issues (e.g., seek data that is accurate and based on appropriate methods of investigation)

Estimating Population Size

C: Environments are often viewed from a physical and biological perspective but, to fully understand how they function, it is important to view them from a chemical perspective as well. A study of environmental chemistry helps students understand that chemical substances make up the underlying fabric of the world and are part of the process in all natural cycles and changes. Through this unit, students also become aware of human-produced chemical substances that enter and interact with environments and they investigate the potential impacts of different substances on the distribution and abundance of living things.

C.2: identify processes for measuring different substances in the environment and for monitoring air and water quality

C.2.1: identify the ways in which humans affect air and water quality through the use of chemicals at home and in the workplace

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem

C.2.3: identify acids, bases and neutral substances, based on their pH (e.g., use indicator solutions or pH meters to measure the pH in water supplies)

Titration
pH Analysis
pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

C.5: apply science-related performing and recording skills to conduct investigations into the relationships among observations and gather and record data at home, in the workplace and in the community

C.5.2: use instruments and materials effectively and accurately to collect data (e.g., measure and compare the pH in household products)

Triple Beam Balance

C.5.3: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or experiment

Diffusion
Seed Germination

C.10: value and use scientific methods to carefully gather evidence when investigating problems and issues (e.g., consider observations and ideas from a number of sources during investigations)

Estimating Population Size

D: Electricity provides the means to energize many devices, systems and processes that are part of our technological environment. Electrical devices are used to transfer and transform energy, to provide mechanisms for control and to transmit information in a variety of forms. In this unit, students learn about electrical conversions and the societal and environmental implications associated with the production and use of electrical energy. Using a conversion, problem-solving approach, students create and modify circuits. Students also develop skills for evaluating technologies by comparing alternative designs and by considering their efficiency, effectiveness and environmental impact.

D.1: investigate the use of devices to convert various forms of energy to electrical energy and electrical energy to other forms

D.1.1: identify and describe everyday forms of energy (e.g., mechanical, chemical, thermal and electrical)

Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Roller Coaster Physics

D.1.3: identify examples of energy transfer and transformation (e.g., chemical energy transformed into electrical energy and then to light energy in a flashlight; mechanical energy transformed into electrical energy and then transferred through power grids)

Energy Conversion in a System

D.2: describe technologies used for transfer and control of electrical energy

D.2.3: identify electrical conductors and insulators

Circuit Builder

D.2.4: create and explain simple series and parallel electrical circuits

Advanced Circuits
Circuit Builder
Circuits

D.2.5: describe the relationship among current, voltage and resistance and relate to amperes, volts and ohms

Circuits

D.5: apply science-related initiating and planning skills to ask questions about the relationships among observable variables at home, in the workplace and in the community

D.5.1: identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., identify such questions as, ?How can the amount of electric current in a circuit be controlled??)

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

D.5.2: state a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events.

Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

D.6: apply science-related performing and recording skills to conduct investigations into the relationships among observations and gather and record data at home, in the workplace and in the community

D.6.2: use instruments effectively and accurately to collect data (e.g., use voltmeters).

Triple Beam Balance

D.8: apply science-related communication and teamwork skills to work collaboratively on problems and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results at home, in the workplace and in the community

D.8.2: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., use charts to present data on the voltage and current found in series and parallel circuits).

Identifying Nutrients

E: Technologies have played an essential role in the study of space and in the emerging use of space environments. Our modern understanding of space has developed in conjunction with advances in techniques for viewing distant objects, for transmitting images and data through space and for manned and unmanned space exploration. A study of space exploration provides an opportunity for students to examine how science and technology interact and to learn how one process augments the other. Students become aware that technologies developed to meet the challenges of space are applied to new purposes.

E.2: identify problems when developing technologies for space exploration and describe technologies developed for life in space

E.2.2: investigate technologies used for life-support systems (e.g., investigate systems that involve the recycling of water and air)

DNA Analysis
Roller Coaster Physics

E.4: apply science-related initiating and planning skills to ask questions about the relationships among observable variables at home, in the workplace and in the community

E.4.2: state a prediction or hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events (e.g., predict the next appearance of a comet, based on past observations).

Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

E.5: apply science-related performing and recording skills to conduct investigations into the relationships among observations and gather and record data at home, in the workplace and in the community

E.5.3: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to a given task or experiment (e.g., maintain a log of observed changes in the night sky).

Diffusion
Seed Germination

E.10: value and use scientific methods to carefully gather evidence when investigating problems and issues (e.g., consider observations and ideas from a number of sources before drawing a conclusion)

Estimating Population Size

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.