I: Kinematics and Dynamics

I.B: Vector and Scalar Quantities

I.B.1: Define the following terms: vector quantity, scalar quantity, resultant vector, vector resolution, equivalent vectors, collinear vectors.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.2: Identify vector and scalar quantities.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.3: Distinguish between vector and scalar quantities.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.6: Explain or demonstrate an understanding of the following important concepts: a resultant vector, vector addition, resolving a vector into components.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.8: Add two or more collinear vectors algebraically and graphically to determine the resultant vector.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.9: Identify collinear and non-collinear vectors.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.10: Identify equivalent vectors.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.14: Demonstrate an understanding of vector addition and subtraction in two dimensions.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.15: Determine the magnitude and the direction of a resultant vector, both graphically and mathematically, given any two or more vectors acting in two dimensions.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.16: Demonstrate an understanding that both magnitude and direction must be stated to specify vector quantities.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.21: Resolve a vector into the effective values of two independent component vectors.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.B.22: Determine the resultant vector of two or more non-perpendicular vectors acting in two dimensions using the vector component method.

Adding Vectors
Vectors

I.C: Distance and Displacement

I.C.1: Define the following terms: position, reference point, number line, displacement, equivalent displacements, distance, negative vector.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

I.C.7: Determine the displacement of an object on a velocity versus time graph or a position versus time graph.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

I.D: Speed and Velocity

I.D.1: Define the following terms: speed, velocity, average speed, average velocity, instantaneous speed, instantaneous velocity.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

I.D.2: Distinguish among: speed and velocity; velocity, average velocity, and instantaneous velocity; speed, average speed, and instantaneous speed.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

I.D.3: Calculate speed, average speed, velocity and average velocity.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

I.D.6: Interpret the type of motion depicted by a displacement versus time graph or a position versus time graph.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

I.D.9: Analyze position versus time graphs or displacement versus time graphs to determine velocity, average velocity, and instantaneous velocity.

Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

I.D.10: Solve problems relating to speed and velocity.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

I.D.12: Determine the slope on a graph and derive the correct units depending on the physical quantities which have been plotted on the graph.

Determining a Spring Constant
Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

I.E: Acceleration

I.E.1: Define the following terms: acceleration, average acceleration, instantaneous acceleration.

Free-Fall Laboratory

I.E.4: Give examples of objects undergoing constant acceleration.

Atwood Machine
Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

I.E.5: Determine the average velocity of an object graphically and algebraically.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

I.E.7: Distinguish between positive and negative acceleration.

Free-Fall Laboratory

I.E.8: Recognize situations which illustrate an acceleration of zero.

Free-Fall Laboratory

I.E.9: Analyze velocity versus time graphs to determine acceleration, average acceleration, and instantaneous acceleration.

Free-Fall Laboratory

I.E.10: Analyze velocity versus time graphs to determine an object's displacement during specified time intervals.

Free-Fall Laboratory

I.E.12: Obtain instantaneous accelerations from a velocity versus time graph and use them to develop an acceleration versus time graph.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

I.E.13: Recognize that the equations for uniformly accelerated motion can be derived from first principles.

Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

I.E.14: Solve problems involving acceleration using the equations for uniformly accelerated motion.

Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

I.E.15: Use a velocity versus time graph to develop a displacement versus time graph and an acceleration versus time graph.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

I.E.18: Relate an understanding of acceleration to familiar experiences and practical applications.

Free-Fall Laboratory

I.F: Newton's Laws of Motion

I.F.1: Define the following terms: inertia, free body diagram, unbalanced force, net force, inertial mass.

Atwood Machine
Fan Cart Physics
Inclined Plane - Simple Machine

I.F.2: Explain what is meant by inertia.

Atwood Machine
Fan Cart Physics

I.F.6: Explain what is meant by an unbalanced force.

Atwood Machine
Fan Cart Physics
Inclined Plane - Simple Machine

I.F.7: Analyze situations involving balanced and unbalanced forces on various objects with the aid of free body diagrams.

Atwood Machine

I.F.11: Solve problems involving Newton's laws of motion.

Atwood Machine
Fan Cart Physics

I.F.12: Predict the direction of acceleration on an object, given the direction of the unbalanced force.

Atwood Machine

I.F.13: Predict the direction of the unbalanced force acting on an object, given the direction of the acceleration.

Atwood Machine

I.F.14: Interpret direct and inverse relationships, as they occur in Newton's second law.

Atwood Machine
Fan Cart Physics

I.F.16: Explain how the inertial mass of an object can be determined.

Fan Cart Physics

II: Mechanical Energy

II.A: Work

II.A.1: Define the following terms: applied force, work, energy, positive work, negative work.

Pulley Lab

II.A.2: Distinguish between positive work and negative work.

Pulley Lab

II.A.5: Express the correct SI fundamental or derived units for work, energy, and various other types of physical quantities.

Pulley Lab

II.A.8: Give examples to illustrate how energy is transferred from one object to another when work is done.

Pulley Lab

II.A.10: Solve problems involving work and energy.

Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Pulley Lab

II.B: Power

II.B.4: Solve problems involving work, power, and energy.

Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Pulley Lab

II.C: Kinetic Energy

II.C.3: Show how the fundamental units for kinetic energy or potential energy are related to the derived units (J) for energy.

Air Track
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Potential Energy on Shelves

II.C.4: Solve problems relating to kinetic energy.

Air Track
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

II.D: Gravitational Potential Energy

II.D.1: Define the following terms: gravitational potential energy, base level, ground level, total mechanical energy.

Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Potential Energy on Shelves

II.D.2: Distinguish between ground level and an arbitrary base level.

Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

II.D.3: Recognize that as an object is raised vertically, the work done on the object results in an equivalent increase in gravitational potential energy.

Pulley Lab

II.D.4: Solve problems relating to gravitational potential energy, and to its relationship with kinetic energy and total mechanical energy.

Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

III: Electricity

III.B: Current and Potential Difference

III.B.1: Current

III.B.1.1: Define the following terms: elementary charge, electric circuit, electric current, ammeter, schematic diagram, direct current, alternating current.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.B.1.10: Draw a schematic diagram of an electric circuit.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.B.2: Electric Potential Difference

III.B.2.1: Define the following terms: electric field, positive test charge, electric lines of force, chassis ground, electric potential difference.

Electromagnetic Induction

III.B.2.2: State the convention used to represent electric lines of force in an electric field.

Electromagnetic Induction

III.B.2.3: Explain what happens to a charge in an electric field.

Electromagnetic Induction

III.B.2.11: Explain that there is a zero potential difference between a ground and the rest of the circuit.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.B.2.14: Show the correct method for connecting a voltmeter in an electric circuit.

Circuits

III.B.2.15: Explain how the terminals of both a voltmeter and an ammeter must be connected in an electric circuit.

Circuits

III.B.3: Ohm's Law

III.B.3.1: Define the following terms: resistance, conductance, superconductivity, resistivity.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.B.3.2: Recognize that a relationship exists between the potential difference and the current in an electric circuit.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.B.3.3: State Ohm's Law.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.B.3.4: Apply Ohm's Law to problems in electricity.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.B.3.5: Use the correct units and symbol for resistance.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.C: Electric Circuits

III.C.2: Series and Parallel Circuits

III.C.2.1: Define the following terms: series circuit, parallel circuit, equivalent resistance.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.C.2.2: Draw a schematic diagram of a series circuit and a parallel circuit.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.C.2.4: Determine an equivalent resistance to replace two or more resistors in an electric circuit.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.C.2.6: Recognize the importance of using Ohm's Law and Kirchhoff's Laws in analyzing electric circuits.

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

III.D: Electric Power and Energy

III.D.13: Understand overloading of circuits in the home (circuit breakers and fuses).

Advanced Circuits

IV: Nuclear Physics

IV.A: Natural Radioactivity

IV.A.1: Define the following terms: radioactivity, isotopes, alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, dosimetry, absorbed dose, dose equivalent, quality factor.

Nuclear Decay

V: Applications of Kinematics and Dynamics: Optional

V.A: Momentum

V.A.1: Impulse and Momentum

V.A.1.1: Define the following terms: momentum, impulse.

2D Collisions
Air Track

V.A.1.4: Compare the directions of the momentum, impulse, force, and velocity vectors in a given situation.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.A.2: The Law of Conservation of Momentum

V.A.2.1: Define the following terms: isolated system, centre of mass.

2D Collisions
Air Track

V.A.2.3: Recognize that momentum is conserved in an isolated system in one or more dimensions.

2D Collisions
Air Track

V.A.2.4: Apply mathematical expressions of the Law of Conservation of Momentum to problem solving.

2D Collisions
Air Track

V.A.2.5: Recognize the significance of the centre of mass of an isolated system.

2D Collisions

V.B: Frictional Forces

V.B.3: Give examples of some moving objects which will eventually come to rest due to friction.

Free-Fall Laboratory

V.B.4: Explain that a sufficient force needs to be applied to an object before it will begin to move.

Free-Fall Laboratory

V.B.5: Identify situations in which it is desirable to increase or reduce the amount of friction between surfaces in contact.

Free-Fall Laboratory
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

V.B.6: Give examples of various ways in which frictional forces can either be increased or decreased.

Free-Fall Laboratory

V.B.7: Explain that the normal force acts to oppose the force of gravity.

Gravitational Force
Pith Ball Lab

V.B.8: Explain that the normal force must be equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force of gravity for the object to remain in equilibrium.

Gravitational Force
Pith Ball Lab

V.B.9: Explain that the structure supporting an object must be capable of producing a normal force to withstand the force of gravity acting on the structure by the object, otherwise the structure will undergo failure.

Gravitational Force
Pith Ball Lab

V.B.11: Solve problems involving kinetic or static friction.

Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

V.C: Projectile Motion

V.C.1: Define the following terms: acceleration due to gravity, projectile, firing angle, trajectory, frame of reference, and terminal velocity.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.C.2: Explain that mass will not substantially influence the motion of objects falling in a vacuum.

Free-Fall Laboratory

V.C.3: State the approximate value of the acceleration due to gravity for an object falling freely near the surface of the Earth.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.C.4: State that an object dropped from rest experiences a downward acceleration.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.C.5: Explain that an object thrown vertically upward experiences a downward acceleration.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.C.6: Explain the effect of air resistance on falling bodies.

Free-Fall Laboratory

V.C.7: Predict the motion that would be experienced by various different types of falling objects.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.C.8: Devise strategies for changing the terminal velocity of falling objects.

Free-Fall Laboratory

V.C.10: Solve problems involving vertical free fall using equations for uniformly accelerated motion.

Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.C.11: Recognize that projectile motion can be analyzed by considering the horizontal and vertical components of the motion separately.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.C.14: Apply kinematic equations for uniform acceleration to analyze the vertical motion of a projectile.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.C.15: Solve a variety of problems related to projectile motion.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

V.D: Uniform Circular Motion

V.D.1: Define the following terms: centripetal acceleration, centripetal force.

Uniform Circular Motion

V.D.2: Explain why an object travelling in a circular path at a constant speed undergoes a change in velocity.

Uniform Circular Motion

V.D.3: Illustrate the direction of the velocity vector, the centripetal acceleration vector, and the centripetal force vector for a moving object at a specific position on a circular path.

Uniform Circular Motion

V.D.5: Recognize that if an object were suddenly released from its circular path, it would tend to continue to move in the direction of the velocity vector, unless it was acted upon by some external force.

Uniform Circular Motion

V.D.6: Explain that centripetal acceleration acts in the same direction as the change in velocity.

Uniform Circular Motion

V.D.7: Explain that centripetal force acts in the same direction as centripetal acceleration.

Uniform Circular Motion

V.D.8: Use mathematical relationships for centripetal acceleration and centripetal force to solve problems involving circular motion.

Uniform Circular Motion

V.E: Universal Gravitation

V.E.1: Define the following terms: field, force, mass, weight, gravitational field strength.

Gravitational Force
Pith Ball Lab

V.E.2: State the correct SI units and symbols for force, mass, and weight.

Chemical Equations

V.E.3: Describe the effects that a force can have when acting on an object.

Fan Cart Physics

V.E.12: Solve problems relating to gravitational force.

Gravitational Force
Pith Ball Lab

V.E.14: Determine the gravitational force on an object at various distances, expressed in multiples of Earth radii, from the centre of the Earth.

Free-Fall Laboratory
Gravitational Force
Pith Ball Lab

VI: Fluid Mechanics: Optional

VI.A: Density

VI.A.1: Define the following terms: density, relative density (specific gravity).

Density Laboratory

VI.A.2: Recognize that density is a characteristic property of matter.

Density Laboratory

VI.A.3: State the SI unit for density.

Density Laboratory

VI.A.4: Solve problems based on an understanding of density.

Density Laboratory

VI.A.5: Apply concepts of length, mass, area, volume (etc.) to specific tasks.

Density Laboratory

VI.D: Archimedes' Principle

VI.D.1: Define the following terms: buoyant force, apparent weight.

Archimedes' Principle

VI.D.4: Solve problems relating to Archimedes principle.

Archimedes' Principle

VII: Electromagnetism: Optional

VII.A: Magnetism

VII.A.1: Define the following terms: ferromagnetic, soft ferromagnetic, hard ferromagnetic, compass, magnetic field, magnetic lines of force, north- seeking pole, angle of declination, south- seeking pole, angle of magnetic dip.

Magnetic Induction

VII.A.7: State some important properties of magnetic lines of force.

Magnetic Induction

VII.A.10: Investigate important uses of magnets in different technological applications.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.B: Electromagnetism

VII.B.9: State Ampere's Rule (right-hand rule) for a solenoid.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.B.13: Transfer an understanding of electromagnetism to practical applications.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.B.14: Solve problems relating to electromagnetism.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.C: The Motor Principle

VII.C.1: State the motor principle.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.C.4: Apply the motor principle to explain important applications such as electric meters or electric motors.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.C.5: Identify the main components of an electric motor.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.D: Electromagnetic Induction

VII.D.1: Define the following terms: induce, induced field, inducing field.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.D.2: Identify the conditions which must occur before a current can be induced within a conductor.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.D.4: Explain that the interaction between the induced and inducing magnetic fields produces a temporary change in the external magnetic field.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.D.5: State Lenz's Law.

Electromagnetic Induction

VII.D.7: Apply Lenz's Law to investigate electromagnetic induction.

Electromagnetic Induction

VIII: Atomic Physics: Optional

VIII.A: Atomic Theory

VIII.A.1: Define the following terms: atomic number, isotope, radioisotopes, nuclear binding force, average binding energy, nuclear mass defect, nuclear binding energy, photon.

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction

VIII.A.8: Explain some of the important characteristics of the Bohr model of the atom.

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction

VIII.A.14: Describe some of the electron orbital descriptions provided by quantum theory.

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction

VIII.B: Half Life and Radioactive Decay

VIII.B.1: Define the following terms: transmutation, alpha decay, beta decay, gamma decay, neutrino, disintegration (decay) series, nuclide charts, background radiation, decay constant, half-life.

Half-life
Nuclear Decay

VIII.B.4: Explain that in alpha particle decay an element with a lower mass is formed.

Half-life

VIII.B.7: Recognize that in beta particle decay the beta particle released originated in the nucleus of the atom, not in the electron orbital. A neutron disappears, and in its place a proton and an electron appear.

Nuclear Decay

VIII.B.8: Develop general expressions for alpha and beta decay.

Nuclear Decay

VIII.B.9: Identify alpha, beta, and gamma decay from generalized expressions or nuclear equations.

Nuclear Decay

VIII.B.14: Write equations representing nuclear decay.

Nuclear Decay

VIII.B.15: Balance nuclear equations correctly for atomic number and atomic mass number.

Nuclear Decay

VIII.B.25: Determine the decay constant from the half-life and vice versa.

Half-life

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

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