I: Review of Basic Principles

I.1: Exhibit an understanding of the language and organization of chemistry.

I.1.3: Use the periodic table.

Electron Configuration

I.1.4: Write the formula of a compound, given its name.

Chemical Equations

I.1.5: Write the name of a compound, given the formula.

Chemical Equations

I.1.7: Balance chemical equations for mass and for charge.

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations
Stoichiometry

I.2: Develop their abilities to meet their own learning needs.

I.2.2: Analyze information from graphs and tables.

Seasons Around the World

II: Laboratory Activities

II.1: Acquire concrete experiences of chemical events which form the basis for abstract understandings.

Chemical Changes
Equilibrium and Concentration

II.2: Gain proficiency in manipulating laboratory equipment.

Triple Beam Balance

II.3: Strengthen understanding within chemistry through applying knowledge of numbers and their interrelationships.

Determining a Spring Constant
Estimating Population Size

II.4: Develop a contemporary view of technology.

DNA Analysis
Electromagnetic Induction

III: Independent Research

III.1: Develop abilities to meet own learning needs.

III.1.5: Explore issues or topics which address their interests and concerns.

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

III.3: Develop an understanding of how knowledge is created, evaluated, refined and changed within chemistry.

III.3.1: Participate in scientific inquiry.

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Seed Germination
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

III.4: Develop compassionate, empathetic and fair-minded students who can make positive contributions to society as individuals and as members of groups.

III.4.5: Share the results of their research project with other students, teachers, parents, or members of the community.

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

III.4.6: Share the results of their research by developing displays, exhibits, performances, presentations, demonstrations, lectures, or other appropriate methods.

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

IV: Case Study

IV.1: Apply knowledge of chemistry to understanding how that chemistry is developed or used.

IV.1.1: Determine the basic chemical principles which were under study or in use in the case.

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

IV.3: Understand how knowledge is created, evaluated, refined and changed within chemistry.

IV.3.4: Share the results of research by developing displays, exhibits, performances, presentations, demonstrations, lectures, or other appropriate means.

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

V: Solubility and Solutions

V.4: Promote both intuitive, imaginative thought and the ability to evaluate ideas, processes, and experiences in meaningful contexts.

V.4.4: Generate and explore rules underlying categories.

Dichotomous Keys

V.4.5: Propose generalizations which explain relationships.

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

VI: Energy Changes in Chemical Reactions

VI.1: Examine the relationships between heat energy and reactions.

VI.1.1: Recognize that energy changes are associated with chemical reactions.

Chemical Changes

VI.1.3: Differentiate between endothermic and exothermic reactions.

Chemical Changes

VI.1.5: Explain the difference between heat and temperature.

Calorimetry Lab
Energy Conversion in a System
Temperature and Particle Motion

VI.2: Understand the quantitative description of enthalpy change.

VI.2.1: Measure some energy changes in chemical reactions.

Chemical Changes

VI.5: Strengthen understanding of chemistry through applying knowledge of numbers and their interrelationships.

VI.5.1: Read, and interpret meaning from, graphs, charts and tables.

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station
Seasons Around the World

VI.5.3: Use graphs, charts and tables to help explain concepts and ideas about energy changes.

Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

VI.6: Develop an understanding of how knowledge is created, evaluated, refined and changed within chemistry.

VI.6.1: Make careful observations of energy effects in reactions, and explain how those effects can be used to make inferences about the atomic and molecular rearrangements.

Chemical Changes

VII: Reaction Kinetics

VII.1: Examine the factors which influence reaction rates in the context of the collision theory.

VII.1.1: Suggest some ways in which the rate of a chemical reaction could be measured.

Collision Theory

VII.1.2: Identify some factors which affect the rate of chemical reactions.

Collision Theory

VII.1.3: Apply collision theory to account for the factors which affect the rates of chemical reactions.

Collision Theory

VII.1.5: Understand how a series of simple reactions can constitute a reaction mechanism for a complex reaction.

Chemical Changes
Chemical Equations
Equilibrium and Concentration

VII.2: Consider molecular level events in a chemical reaction.

VII.2.4: Explain the role of catalysts in chemical reactions.

Collision Theory

VII.2.6: Describe the use of catalysts in a variety of applications.

Collision Theory

VII.3: Strengthen knowledge and understanding of how to compute, measure, estimate and interpret quantitative data, when to apply these skills and techniques, and why these processses are important in studying chemical energetics.

VII.3.2: Understand the principles and difficulties of measuring rates of chemical reactions, and inventing suitable procedures for measurement.

Collision Theory

VII.4: Promote both intuitive, imaginative thought and the ability to evaluate ideas, processes, and experiences in meaningful contexts.

VII.4.4: Discover relationships and patterns.

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

VII.4.5: Generate, classify and explore reasons or rules underlying categories.

Dichotomous Keys

VII.6: Develop their abilities to meet their own learning needs.

VII.6.4: Interpret and report results of learning experiences.

Pendulum Clock

VIII: Equilibrium

VIII.1: Recognize the characteristics and dynamics of equilibrium reactions.

VIII.1.1: Observe and describe some reactions which are easily reversible and some which are not easily reversible.

Equilibrium and Concentration

VIII.1.3: Discuss non-chemical analogies which illustrate or simulate equilibria.

Diffusion
Equilibrium and Concentration
Equilibrium and Pressure

VIII.1.4: Distinguish between dynamic equilibria and steady-state processes.

Diffusion
Equilibrium and Concentration
Equilibrium and Pressure

VIII.1.6: Understand why Le Chatelier's principle works.

Equilibrium and Concentration
Equilibrium and Pressure

VIII.1.7: Use Le Chatelier's principle to predict how various equilibrium systems will shift in response to external stress.

Equilibrium and Concentration
Equilibrium and Pressure

VIII.2: Understand some quantitative aspects of equilibrium systems.

VIII.2.1: Write the equilibrium constant expression for a chemical reaction using the general equation: aA(aq) + bB(aq) equilibrium symbol cC(g) + dD(aq).

Equilibrium and Concentration
Equilibrium and Pressure

VIII.2.2: Recognize that Keq values are dependent upon temperature but are independent of concentration.

Equilibrium and Concentration

VIII.2.4: Interpret Keq values to determine whether products or reactants are favoured once equilibrium has been reached.

Equilibrium and Concentration
Equilibrium and Pressure

VIII.2.5: Solve problems involving the equilibrium constant expression for a chemical reaction, with concentrations expressed in mol√ólitre to the -1 power and kPa.

Equilibrium and Concentration

VIII.3: Use a wide range of language experiences for developing knowledge of equilibrium systems.

VIII.3.1: Show understanding of equilibrium by rephrasing text or classroom definitions and explanations, creating models, drawing diagrams and concept maps.

Diffusion
Equilibrium and Concentration
Equilibrium and Pressure

VIII.3.2: Discuss the relationships between the activities and analogies used to illustrate equilibrium and the principles of equilibria.

Equilibrium and Concentration

VIII.3.3: Ask pertinent questions (prior questions, contextual questions, evaluative questions) and discuss multiple responses to those questions.

Diffusion

VIII.4: Strengthen knowledge and understanding of how to compute, measure, estimate and interpret mathematical data, when to apply these skills and techniques, and why these processes apply within chemistry.

VIII.4.2: Understand the quantitative nature of equilibria.

Diffusion
Equilibrium and Concentration
Equilibrium and Pressure

VIII.4.5: Use problem solving tools such as tables and calculators.

Equilibrium and Pressure

IX: Acid-Base Equilibria

IX.1: Investigate the nature of acids and bases.

IX.1.4: Describe the Bronsted-Lowry conceptual definition of acids and bases.

Titration

IX.1.5: Identify the conjugate bases formed in acid dissociation.

Titration

IX.1.7: Identify the conjugate acid of any base.

Titration

IX.1.9: Compare the strengths of the dissociations in the dissociation series for a polyprotic acid.

Titration

IX.2: Consider how the ionization of water interacts with acid and base dissociations.

IX.2.5: Express the [H+] as a pH value.

Titration

IX.2.7: Estimate the pH of solutions, using indicator solutions and indicator papers.

Titration

IX.3: Explore the principles of neutralization.

IX.3.3: Solve mathematical problems involving data from titrations.

Titration

IX.3.4: Develop skill in doing titrations.

Titration

IX.4: Strengthen understanding of equilibria through quantitative analysis of acid/base reactions.

IX.4.5: Use information from Ka tables to calculate pH values in solutions and check results of calculations with indicators.

Titration

IX.5: Develop an understanding of how knowledge is created, refined and changed within chemistry.

IX.5.2: Develop and conduct investigations and research.

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

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