C: Cells

C.2: investigate functions and processes of plant and animal cells;

C.2.2: use a microscope correctly and safely to find and observe components of plant and animal cells (e.g., using an onion slice or a prepared slide of a protist) and make accurate drawings of their observations

Cell Structure

C.2.4: use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate the processes of osmosis and diffusion

Osmosis

C.2.5: use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including organelle, diffusion, osmosis, cell theory, selective permeability, membrane, stage, and eyepiece, in oral and written communication

Osmosis
RNA and Protein Synthesis

C.2.6: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., using the conventions of science, make a labelled drawing of a cell; create a slide show to explain the results of investigations into the processes of osmosis and diffusion)

Graphing Skills

C.3: demonstrate an understanding of the basic structure and function of plant and animal cells and cell processes.

C.3.1: demonstrate an understanding of the postulates of the cell theory (e.g., the cell is the basic unit of life; all cells come from pre-existing cells; all living things are made up of one or more cells)

Paramecium Homeostasis

C.3.2: identify structures and organelles in cells, including the nucleus, cell membrane, cell wall, chloroplasts, vacuole, mitochondria, and cytoplasm, and explain the basic functions of each (e.g., the nucleus holds all the information needed to make every cell in the body)

Cell Energy Cycle
Cell Structure
Paramecium Homeostasis
RNA and Protein Synthesis

C.3.3: compare the structure and function of plant and animal cells

Cell Structure

C.3.4: explain the processes of diffusion and osmosis and their roles within a cell

Osmosis
Paramecium Homeostasis

C.3.5: identify unicellular organisms (e.g., amoebae) and multicellular organisms (e.g., hydra, invertebrates [worms], vertebrates [frogs]), and compare ways in which they meet their basic needs (e.g., nutrition, movement, gas exchange)

Paramecium Homeostasis

SiA: Systems in Action

SiA.2: investigate a working system and the ways in which components of the system contribute to its desired function;

SiA.2.2: investigate the work done in a variety of everyday activities and record the findings quantitatively (e.g., calculate the work done when lifting dumbbells by measuring the force required to move the dumbbell and multiplying by the distance the dumbbell moves)

Ants on a Slant (Inclined Plane)

SiA.2.3: use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate mechanical advantage in a variety of mechanisms and simple machines

Ants on a Slant (Inclined Plane)
Levers
Wheel and Axle

SiA.2.4: use technological problem-solving skills to investigate a system (e.g., an optical system, a mechanical system, an electrical system) that performs a function or meets a need

Trebuchet

SiA.2.6: use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including mechanical advantage, input, output, friction, gravity, forces, and efficiency, in oral and written communication

Pulley Lab

SiA.2.7: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., using appropriate mathematical conventions, create a graph to represent changes in mechanical advantage when certain factors in a mechanism are manipulated)

Hearing: Frequency and Volume
Ocean Mapping

SiA.3: demonstrate an understanding of different types of systems and the factors that contribute to their safe and efficient operation.

SiA.3.4: compare, using examples, the scientific definition with the everyday use of the terms work, force, energy, and efficiency

Ants on a Slant (Inclined Plane)
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Pulley Lab

SiA.3.5: understand and use the formula work = force × distance (W = F × d) to establish the relationship between work, force, and distance moved parallel to the force in simple systems

Ants on a Slant (Inclined Plane)
Pulley Lab

SiA.3.6: calculate the mechanical advantage (MA = force needed without a simple machine divided by force needed with a simple machine) of various mechanical systems (e.g., a wheelbarrow allows a smaller force to lift a larger weight, a hockey stick allows a short movement of hands to move the blade a larger distance, a simple fixed pulley system redirects the effort force)

Levers
Pulley Lab
Wheel and Axle

SiA.3.7: explain ways in which mechanical systems produce heat, and describe ways to make these systems more efficient (e.g., friction produces heat, which can be reduced by lubrication)

Energy Conversion in a System

SiA.3.9: identify social factors that influence the evolution of a system (e.g., growing concern over the amount of waste creates a need for recycling centres, and the recycling centres must grow as population and waste increase; the desire to make tasks easier creates a need for pulley systems, gear systems, and hydraulic and pneumatic systems; changes in traditional work hours created by technological advances can influence changes in a child care system)

Roller Coaster Physics

F: Fluids

F.2: investigate the properties of fluids;

F.2.3: investigate and compare the density of a variety of liquids (e.g., water, salt water, corn syrup, liquid soap)

Density Laboratory

F.2.8: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., using appropriate scientific and/or technological conventions, create a technical drawing of a pneumatic/hydraulic device; create a brochure or a multimedia presentation outlining safe and unsafe uses of the device that was modelled)

Hearing: Frequency and Volume
Ocean Mapping

F.3: demonstrate an understanding of the properties and uses of fluids.

F.3.2: describe the relationship between mass, volume, and density as a property of matter

Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
Density Laboratory
Mineral Identification

F.3.3: explain the difference between solids, liquids, and gases in terms of density, using the particle theory of matter (e.g., in general, solids are more dense than liquids, which are more dense than gases)

Temperature and Particle Motion

F.3.5: determine the buoyancy of an object, given its density, in a variety of fluids (e.g., less dense objects float, more dense objects sink)

Archimedes' Principle
Density Laboratory
Density via Comparison
Determining Density via Water Displacement

WS: Water Systems

WS.2: investigate factors that affect local water quality;

WS.2.6: use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including water table, aquifer, polar ice-cap, and salinity, in oral and written communication

Porosity

WS.2.7: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g. using appropriate scientific conventions, draw a labelled diagram of a water treatment facility; create a brochure about the safe use of wells and septic tanks)

Hearing: Frequency and Volume

WS.3: demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of the earth?s water systems and the influence of water systems on a specific region.

WS.3.4: identify factors (e.g., annual precipitation, temperature, climate change) that affect the size of glaciers and polar ice-caps, and describe the effects of these changes on local and global water systems

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

WS.3.5: explain changes in atmospheric conditions caused by the presence of bodies of water (e.g., differences in temperature near large bodies of water; microclimates; storms off coastal areas)

Coastal Winds and Clouds - Metric

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.