HOS: Human Organ System

HOS.2: investigate the structure and function of the major organs of various human body systems;

HOS.2.3: design and build a model to demonstrate how organs or components of body systems in the human body work and interact with other components (e.g., build a model that shows how muscles, bones, and joints in the human body work together as a system to allow movement of the arms or legs; build a model to show how the lungs and heart work as a system)

Circulatory System

HOS.2.5: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., create labelled charts or graphs to show changes in heart rate and breathing as a result of exercising)

Graphing Skills

HOS.3: demonstrate an understanding of the structure and function of human body systems and interactions within and between systems.

HOS.3.1: identify major systems in the human body (e.g., musculoskeletal system, digestive system, nervous system, circulatory system) and describe their roles and interrelationships

Circulatory System

HOS.3.2: describe the basic structure and function of major organs in the respiratory, circulatory, and digestive systems (e.g., we have two lungs; each one is about 25?30 cm long and cone-shaped; the right lung is slightly bigger because it has three lobes and the left lung has only two; our lungs are responsible for gas exchanges)

Circulatory System

HOS.3.3: identify interrelationships between body systems (e.g., the respiratory system provides oxygen and removes carbon dioxide for the circulatory system)

Homeostasis

FASM: Forces Acting on Structures and Mechanisms

FASM.1: analyse social and environmental impacts of forces acting on structures and mechanisms;

FASM.1.2: evaluate the impact of society and the environment on structures and mechanisms, taking different perspectives into account (e.g., the perspectives of golfers, local bird-watching groups, families, a school board), and suggest ways in which structures and mechanisms can be modified to best achieve social and environmental objectives

Pond Ecosystem
Water Pollution

FASM.2: investigate forces that act on structures and mechanisms;

FASM.2.6: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., make an oral presentation explaining the techniques they used to build a model of a bridge that can withstand vibrations from a train)

Graphing Skills
Ocean Mapping

FASM.3: identify forces that act on and within structures and mechanisms, and describe the effects of these forces on structures and mechanisms.

FASM.3.3: explain the advantages and disadvantages of different types of mechanical systems (e.g., a hoist in a lifting system that comprises four pulleys will decrease the amount of force needed by four times, but the force will have to move four times as fast)

Levers
Pulleys
Wheel and Axle

PCM: Properties of and Changes in Matter

PCM.2: conduct investigations that explore the properties of matter and changes in matter;

PCM.2.2: measure temperature and mass, using appropriate instruments (e.g., a thermometer, a single-pan balance)

Weight and Mass

PCM.2.4: use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to determine how the physical properties of materials make them useful for particular tasks (e.g., when cleaning up a liquid spill in the kitchen, which material is best suited to do the job: a piece of sponge, a piece of terry cloth, a paper towel?)

Density Experiment: Slice and Dice

PCM.2.6: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., create a labelled chart or graph to show the time required for an ice cube to melt completely)

Graphing Skills

PCM.3: demonstrate an understanding of the properties of matter, changes of state, and physical and chemical change.

PCM.3.1: identify matter as everything that has mass and occupies space

Weight and Mass

PCM.3.3: explain changes of state in matter (e.g., evaporation, condensation, solidification or freezing, fusion or melting, sublimation), and give examples of each (e.g., water from wet clothes evaporates; steam from a boiling kettle condenses on a cold window; water in ponds and lakes solidifies or freezes in winter; a frozen treat melts on a warm summer day; a moth ball sublimates in the closet)

Phases of Water

PCM.3.6: explain how changes of state involve the release of heat (e.g., when water freezes it releases heat) or the absorption of heat (e.g., when an ice cube melts, it absorbs heat)

Phases of Water

PCM.3.7: identify indicators of a chemical change (e.g., production of a gas, change in colour, formation of precipitate)

Chemical Changes

PCM.3.8: distinguish between a physical change and a chemical change (e.g., a physical change can be reversed [ice to water to ice], whereas a chemical change creates new substance[s] [wood to smoke and ash])

Chemical Changes

CER: Conservation of Energy and Resources

CER.2: investigate energy transformation and conservation;

CER.2.3: use technological problem-solving skills to design, build, and test a device that transforms one form of energy into another (e.g., create a child?s toy that uses the electrical energy from a battery or solar cell to move across the floor [kinetic energy] and make a noise [sound energy]), and examine ways in which energy is being ?lost? in the device

Trebuchet

CER.2.5: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., in a small group, discuss ways in which technological innovations increase and/or decrease our ability to conserve energy)

Graphing Skills
Ocean Mapping

CER.3: demonstrate an understanding of the various forms and sources of energy and the ways in which energy can be transformed and conserved.

CER.3.1: identify a variety of forms of energy (e.g., electrical, chemical, mechanical, heat, light, kinetic) and give examples from everyday life of how that energy is used (e.g., electrical energy for cooking; chemical/electrical energy to run our cars; mechanical energy to hit a baseball; light energy for managing traffic on the roads; heat energy to warm homes and schools)

Energy Conversions
Heat Transfer by Conduction

CER.3.2: identify renewable and non-renewable sources of energy (e.g., renewable: sun, wind, ocean waves and tides, wood; non-renewable: fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas)

Energy Conversions

CER.3.3: describe how energy is stored and transformed in a given device or system (e.g., in a portable electric device, chemical energy stored in a battery is transformed into electrical energy and then into other forms of energy such as mechanical, sound, and/or light energy)

Energy Conversions

CER.3.4: recognize that energy cannot be created or destroyed but can only be changed from one form to another (e.g., chemical energy in a battery becomes electrical energy)

Energy Conversions

CER.3.5: explain that energy that is apparently ?lost? from a system has been transformed into other energy forms (usually heat or sound) that are not useful to the system (e.g., sound from a car?s engine does not help the car move)

Energy Conversions
Radiation

RaM.2.2: use a variety of tests to identify the physical properties of minerals (e.g., hardness [scratch test], colour [streak test], magnetism)

Mineral Identification

RaM.2.3: use a variety of criteria (e.g., colour, texture, lustre) to classify common rocks and minerals according to their characteristics

Mineral Identification

RaM.2.5: use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including hardness, colour, lustre, and texture, in oral and written communication

Mineral Identification

RaM.2.6: use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., use a graphic organizer to show how rocks and minerals are used in daily life)

Graphing Skills
Ocean Mapping

RaM.3: demonstrate an understanding of the physical properties of rocks and minerals.

RaM.3.2: describe the properties (e.g., colour, lustre, streak, transparency, hardness) that are used to identify minerals

Mineral Identification

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.