30?A.1.1k: describe the principal structures and associated blood vessels of the heart; i.e., ventricles, atria, septum, valves (specific names of valves not required), aorta, vena cavae, pulmonary arteries and veins, coronary arteries

Circulatory System

30?A.1.2k: describe the rhythmic contraction of the heart and its function in the general circulation of blood through pulmonary and systemic pathways

Circulatory System

30?A.1.1sts: describe how society provides direction for scientific and technological development

DNA Analysis

30-A: Living Systems Respond to Their Environment

30-A.1: Students will analyze how the human circulatory system facilitates interaction between blood cells and the external environment and investigate cardiovascular health.

30-A.1.3s.1: map blood flow through a mammalian heart

Circulatory System

30-A.1.4s.1: use appropriate International System of Units (SI) notation, fundamental and derived units and significant digits

Unit Conversions 2 - Scientific Notation and Significant Digits

30?A.2.1k: describe how pathogens in the environment (e.g., mosquito-borne parasites, bacteria, viruses) enter the circulatory system and may have an adverse affect on health

Virus Lytic Cycle

30?A.2.1sts: describe how society provides direction for scientific and technological development

DNA Analysis

30?A.2.1s: formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

30?A.2.2s: conduct investigations into relationships among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Triple Beam Balance

30?A.2.4s: work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

Pendulum Clock

30?A.3.2k: explain, with the aid of Punnett squares, the inheritance of single traits by applying current understanding of the gene, segregation and dominance

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

30-A.3: Students will apply the principles of heredity and molecular genetics to explain how human diseases can arise from inherited traits, the risks and benefits of genetic technology, and the need for ethical considerations in the application of scientific knowledge.

30-A.3.4k.1: identifying the structure of DNA as a double helix

Building DNA

30-A.3.4k.2: listing the essential components of DNA as nucleotides

Building DNA
DNA Analysis

30-A.3.4k.3: identifying the base pairings between the strands of the double helix

Building DNA

30?A.3.5k: explain the general process of DNA replication

Building DNA

30?A.3.6k: describe a primary function of DNA by describing how an amino acid sequence of a polypeptide (protein) is determined by the sequence of DNA triplet codes, i.e., use of a table of DNA triplets matched with amino acids

RNA and Protein Synthesis

30?A.3.7k: describe the role of proteins in the human body as regulatory molecules (enzymes), as structural molecules and as a source of energy

Digestive System

30?A.3.1sts: explain that science and technology are developed to meet societal needs and expand human capability

DNA Analysis

30?A.3.1s: formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

30-A.3.3s.1: interpret patterns and trends in data associated with autosomal and sex-linked inheritance

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

30-A.3.3s.2: predict, quantitatively, the probability of acquiring a particular trait in autosomal and sex-linked patterns of inheritance

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

30?A.3.4s: work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

Pendulum Clock

30?B.1.2k: differentiate among acids, bases, neutral ionic compounds, neutral molecular compounds and strong and weak acids, based on appropriate diagnostic tests

Ionic Bonds

30?B.1.4k: explain, qualitatively, how buffers maintain a relatively constant pH when a small amount of acid or base is added to an aqueous system

Titration

30?B.1.6k: trace the historical use of acid-base indicators; e.g., early Aboriginal methods of using extracts from natural substances

Titration

30-B: Chemistry and the Environment

30-B.1: Students will analyze the sources of acids and bases and their effects on the environment.

30-B.1.2s.1: use a pH meter and/or pH paper and indicators to measure the pH of solutions; e.g., collect pH data to study an aquatic ecosystem

Titration

30-B.1.2s.2: use indicators and a conductivity meter to differentiate between a strong acid and a weak acid

Titration

30-B.1.2s.3: perform a titration using a strong monoprotic acid and a strong monoprotic base

Titration

30-B.1.3s.1: use titration data to determine the concentration of a strong acid or a strong base

Titration

30-B.1.4s.1: compare collected titration data with that of other individuals and groups

Titration

30-B.1.4s.2: use appropriate scientific conventions when communicating solutions to titration problems

Titration

30?B.2.1s: formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

30?B.2.2s: conduct investigations into relationships among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Triple Beam Balance

30?B.2.4s: work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

Pendulum Clock

30-B.3: Students will analyze, from a variety of perspectives, the risks and benefits of using chemical processes in meeting human needs and assess technologies for reducing the impact of chemical compounds on the environment.

30-B.3.1s.1: plan an evaluation, including a risk-benefit analysis, of a chemical process or an issue related to its use

Equilibrium and Concentration

30?C.1.1k: define a field as a property of space around a mass, an electric charge or a magnet that causes another mass, electric charge or magnet introduced in to this region to experience a force

Magnetic Induction

30?C.1.6k: describe the relationships, for up to three resistors, among power, current, voltage and resistance for series and parallel circuits, using the equations V = IR, P = VI, P = I2R, RT = R1 + R2 + R3, and (1/RT) = (1/R1) + (1/R2) + (1/R3)

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

30?C.1.12k: describe, in terms of design and electrical energy, the functioning of safety technologies; e.g., circuit fuses and breakers, polarized plugs and ground wiring.

Advanced Circuits

30-C: Electromagnetic Energy

30-C.1: Students will explain field theory and analyze its applications in technologies used to produce, transmit and transform electrical energy.

30-C.1.2s.2: construct an electric circuit to measure current, voltage and resistance, using a voltmeter or an ammeter

Circuits

30-C.1.3s.1: test and evaluate a self-constructed, simple electric generator or motor in terms of design, ruggedness and ability to perform a specific function

Electromagnetic Induction

30-C.1.3s.3: calculate the resistance of series and parallel circuits for a maximum of three resistors

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

30?C.1.4s: work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

Pendulum Clock

30?C.2.1k: describe the range of the electromagnetic spectrum from long, low-frequency radio waves through microwaves, infrared (IR) rays, visible light rays and ultraviolet (UV) radiation to very short, high-frequency waves, such as X-rays and gamma rays

Herschel Experiment - Metric

30?C.2.4k: investigate and describe, qualitatively, the phenomena of reflection, refraction, diffraction and polarization of visible light

Basic Prism
Refraction

30?C.2.5k: compare and contrast the properties of radiation, from any region of the electromagnetic spectrum, with those of visible light; i.e., wavelength, frequency, speed, reflection, refraction, diffraction, penetrability

Basic Prism

30?C.2.9k: describe, in general terms, how a spectroscope can be used to determine the composition of incandescent objects or substances, and the conditions necessary to produce emission (bright line) and absorption (dark line) spectra, in terms of light source and temperature

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Star Spectra

30-C.2: Students will describe the properties of the electromagnetic spectrum and their applications in medical technologies, communication systems and remote-sensing technologies used to study the universe.

30-C.2.10k.1: spectroscopes used to analyze the distribution of energy in a star?s continuous emission spectrum can be used to estimate the surface temperature of the star

Star Spectra

30-C.2.10k.2: Doppler-shift technology used to measure the speed of distant stars provides evidence that the universe is expanding

Doppler Shift
Doppler Shift Advanced

30-C.2.11k: describe, in general terms, the evolution of stars and the existence of black holes, white dwarves and neutron stars.

H-R Diagram

30-C.2.1s.1: design an experiment, identifying specific variables, to investigate the reflection, refraction or polarization of visible light

Basic Prism
Refraction

30-C.2.2s.1: investigate the reflection, refraction or polarization of visible light

Basic Prism
Refraction

30-C.2.2s.2: create data tables from investigations into polarization, reflection or refraction of visible light or draw diagrams to illustrate these phenomena

Basic Prism

30-C.2.2s.3: create a summary table or a diagram of spectral lines observed from gas discharge tubes

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Star Spectra

30-C.2.3s.1: observe and analyze the various spectra of an artificial light source, using a spectroscope, prism or diffraction grating

Star Spectra

30?C.2.4s: work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

Pendulum Clock

30?D.1.2s: conduct investigations into relationships among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Triple Beam Balance

30?D.1.4s: work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

Pendulum Clock

30?D.2.3k: describe the conversion of solar energy into renewable forms (e.g., wind, hydropower, chemical potential energy by photosynthesis) and nonrenewable forms (e.g., coal, oil and gas) and further conversion into electrical and thermal energy

Seasons Around the World

30?D.2.4k: describe the functioning of renewable energy technologies and assess their advantages and disadvantages, including active and passive solar-heating technologies, wind turbines, hydroelectric power, biomass energy, geothermal energy, hydrogen fuel cells

Seasons Around the World

30?D.2.6k: describe the main types and sources of radioactive decay and resulting ionizing radiation; i.e., alpha, beta and gamma decay

Nuclear Decay

30?D.2.12k: explain the source of tides, in terms of gravitational attraction and the relative motions of the sun, moon and Earth

Tides - Metric

30?D.2.2sts: explain that science and technology are developed to meet societal needs and expand human capability

DNA Analysis

30?D.2.1s: formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

30?D.2.2s: conduct investigations into relationships among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Triple Beam Balance

30?D.2.4s: work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

Pendulum Clock

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.