30?A.1.2k: explain, quantitatively, the concepts of impulse and change in momentum, using Newton?s laws of motion

2D Collisions
Air Track

30?A.1.3k: explain, qualitatively, that momentum is conserved in an isolated system

2D Collisions
Air Track

30?A.1.4k: explain, quantitatively, that momentum is conserved in one- and two-dimensional interactions in an isolated system

2D Collisions
Air Track

30?A.1.5k: define, compare and contrast elastic and inelastic collisions, using quantitative examples, in terms of conservation of kinetic energy.

2D Collisions
Air Track

30-A: Momentum and Impulse

30-A.1: Students will explain how momentum is conserved when objects interact in an isolated system.

30-A.1.1s.1: design an experiment and identify and control major variables; e.g., demonstrate the conservation of linear momentum or illustrate the relationship between impulse and change in momentum

Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

30-A.1.2s.1: perform an experiment to demonstrate the conservation of linear momentum, using available technologies; e.g., air track, air table, motion sensors, strobe lights and photography

2D Collisions
Air Track

30-A.1.3s.2: analyze, quantitatively, one- and two-dimensional interactions, using given data or by manipulating objects or computer simulations

2D Collisions
Air Track

30-A.1.4s.1: use appropriate International System of Units (SI) notation, fundamental and derived units and significant digits

Unit Conversions 2 - Scientific Notation and Significant Digits

30?B.1.1k: explain electrical interactions in terms of the law of conservation of charge

Electromagnetic Induction

30?B.1.5k: explain, qualitatively, the principles pertinent to Coulomb?s torsion balance experiment

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

30?B.1.6k: apply Coulomb?s law, quantitatively, to analyze the interaction of two point charges

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

30?B.1.7k: determine, quantitatively, the magnitude and direction of the electric force on a point charge due to two or more other point charges in a plane

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

30?B.1.8k: compare, qualitatively and quantitatively, the inverse square relationship as it is expressed by Coulomb?s law and by Newton?s universal law of gravitation.

Coulomb Force (Static)
Gravitational Force
Pith Ball Lab

30?B.1.1s: formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

30-B: Forces and Fields

30-B.1: Students will explain the behaviour of electric charges, using the laws that govern electrical interactions.

30-B.1.2s.2: perform an experiment to demonstrate the relationships among magnitude of charge, electric force and distance between point charges

Coulomb Force (Static)

30-B.1.3s.1: infer, from empirical evidence, the mathematical relationship among charge, force and distance between point charges

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

30-B.1.3s.2: use free-body diagrams to describe the electrostatic forces acting on a charge

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

30-B.1.3s.3: use graphical techniques to analyze data; e.g., curve straightening (manipulating variables to obtain a straight-line graph)

Determining a Spring Constant
Seasons Around the World

30?B.2.6k: explain, quantitatively, electric fields in terms of intensity (strength) and direction, relative to the source of the field and to the effect on an electric charge

Coulomb Force (Static)

30?B.2.9k: explain, quantitatively, electrical interactions using the law of conservation of energy

Electromagnetic Induction

30?B.2.1s: formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

30-B.2: Students will describe electrical phenomena, using the electric field theory.

30-B.2.3s.3: use free-body diagrams to describe the forces acting on a charge in an electric field

Pith Ball Lab

30?B.3.1k: describe magnetic interactions in terms of forces and fields

Magnetic Induction

30-B.3: Students will explain how the properties of electric and magnetic fields are applied in numerous devices.

30-B.3.3k: describe how the discoveries of Oersted and Faraday form the foundation of the theory relating electricity to magnetism

Magnetic Induction

30?B.3.4k: describe, qualitatively, a moving charge as the source of a magnetic field and predict the orientation of the magnetic field from the direction of motion

Magnetic Induction

30?B.3.5k: explain, qualitatively and quantitatively, how a uniform magnetic field affects a moving electric charge, using the relationships among charge, motion, field direction and strength, when motion and field directions are mutually perpendicular

Electromagnetic Induction

30?B.3.6k: explain, quantitatively, how uniform magnetic and electric fields affect a moving electric charge, using the relationships among charge, motion, field direction and strength, when motion and field directions are mutually perpendicular

Electromagnetic Induction

30?B.3.7k: describe and explain, qualitatively, the interaction between a magnetic field and a moving charge and between a magnetic field and a current-carrying conductor

Magnetic Induction

30-B.3.2s.3: predict, using appropriate hand rules, the relative directions of motion, force and field in electromagnetic interactions

Electromagnetic Induction

30-B.3.3s.4: use free-body diagrams to describe forces acting on an electric charge in electric and magnetic fields

Pith Ball Lab

30?C.1.6k: describe, quantitatively, the phenomena of reflection and refraction, including total internal reflection

Basic Prism
Refraction

30?C.1.7k: describe, quantitatively, simple optical systems, consisting of only one component, for both lenses and curved mirrors

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

30?C.1.11k: describe, qualitatively and quantitatively, how refraction supports the wave model of EMR, using (sin(theta)1)/(sin(theta)2) = n2/n1 = v1/v2 = lamda1/lamda2

Refraction

30-C: Electromagnetic Radiation

30-C.1: Students will explain the nature and behaviour of EMR, using the wave model.

30-C.1.1s.2: predict the conditions required for total internal reflection to occur

Basic Prism

30-C.1.2s.1: perform experiments to demonstrate refraction at plane and uniformly curved surfaces

Refraction

30-C.1.2s.2: perform an experiment to determine the index of refraction of several different substances

Refraction

30-C.1.2s.3: conduct an investigation to determine the focal length of a thin lens and of a curved mirror

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

30-C.1.2s.4: observe the visible spectra formed by diffraction gratings and triangular prisms

Basic Prism

30-C.1.3s.1: derive the mathematical representation of the law of refraction from experimental data

Basic Prism

30-C.1.3s.2: use ray diagrams to describe an image formed by thin lenses and curved mirrors

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

30?C.2.1k: define the photon as a quantum of EMR and calculate its energy

Photoelectric Effect

30?C.2.2k: classify the regions of the electromagnetic spectrum by photon energy

Photoelectric Effect

30?C.2.3k: describe the photoelectric effect in terms of the intensity and wavelength or frequency of the incident light and surface material

Photoelectric Effect

30?C.2.4k: describe, quantitatively, photoelectric emission, using concepts related to the conservation of energy

Photoelectric Effect

30?C.2.5k: describe the photoelectric effect as a phenomenon that supports the notion of the wave-particle duality of EMR

Photoelectric Effect

30-C.2: Students will explain the photoelectric effect, using the quantum model.

30-C.2.1s.1: predict the effect, on photoelectric emissions, of changing the intensity and/or frequency of the incident radiation or material of the photocathode

Photoelectric Effect

30?C.2.2s: conduct investigations into relationships among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Triple Beam Balance

30-C.2.3s.1: analyze and interpret empirical data from an experiment on the photoelectric effect, using a graph that is either drawn by hand or is computer generated

Photoelectric Effect

30-D: Atomic Physics

30-D.1: Students will describe the electrical nature of the atom.

30-D.1.1s.1: identify, define and delimit questions to investigate; e.g., ?What is the importance of cathode rays in the development of atomic models??

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

30?D.2.2k: describe that each element has a unique line spectrum

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Star Spectra

30?D.2.3k: explain, qualitatively, the characteristics of, and the conditions necessary to produce, continuous line-emission and line-absorption spectra

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Star Spectra

30?D.2.5k: calculate the energy difference between states, using the law of conservation of energy and the observed characteristics of an emitted photon

Air Track
Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

30-D.2: Students will describe the quantization of energy in atoms and nuclei.

30-D.2.1s.1: predict the conditions necessary to produce line-emission and line-absorption spectra

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Star Spectra

30-D.2.1s.2: predict the possible energy transitions in the hydrogen atom, using a labelled diagram showing energy levels

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Electron Configuration

30-D.2.2s.1: observe line-emission and line-absorption spectra

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Star Spectra

30-D.2.2s.2: observe the representative line spectra of selected elements

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Star Spectra

30-D.2.3s.1: identify elements represented in sample line spectra by comparing them to representative line spectra of elements

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Star Spectra

30?D.3.1k: describe the nature and properties, including the biological effects, of alpha, beta and gamma radiation

Nuclear Decay

30?D.3.2k: write nuclear equations, using isotope notation, for alpha, beta-negative and beta-positive decays, including the appropriate neutrino and antineutrino

Nuclear Decay

30?D.3.3k: perform simple, nonlogarithmic half-life calculations

Half-life

30-D.3: Students will describe nuclear fission and fusion as powerful energy sources in nature.

30-D.3.1s.1: predict the penetrating characteristics of decay products

Nuclear Decay

30?D.3.2s: conduct investigations into relationships among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Triple Beam Balance

30-D.3.3s.1: graph data from radioactive decay and estimate half-life values

Half-life

30-D.3.3s.2: interpret common nuclear decay chains

Nuclear Decay

30?D.4.5k: describe beta-positive (Beta+) and beta-negative (Beta-) decay, using first-generation elementary fermions and the principle of charge conservation (Feynman diagrams are not required).

Nuclear Decay

30?D.4.2s: conduct investigations into relationships among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Triple Beam Balance

30-D.4: Students will describe the ongoing development of models of the structure of matter.

30-D.4.3s.2: write Beta+ and Beta- decay equations, identifying the elementary fermions involved

Nuclear Decay

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.