A: Biological Diversity (Social and Environmental Emphasis)

A.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

A.1.1: Investigate and interpret diversity among species and within species, and describe how diversity contributes to species survival

A.1.1.1: observe variation in living things, and describe examples of variation among species and within species (e.g., observe and describe characteristics that distinguish two closely related species)

Evolution: Mutation and Selection

A.1.1.3: investigate and interpret dependencies among species that link the survival of one species to the survival of others

A.1.1.3.b: classify symbiotic relationships as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism

Virus Lytic Cycle

A.1.1.4: identify the role of variation in species survival under changing environmental conditions (e.g., resistance to disease, ability to survive in severe environments)

Natural Selection

A.1.2: Investigate the nature of reproductive processes and their role in transmitting species characteristics

A.1.2.1: distinguish between sexual and asexual reproduction, and identify and interpret examples of asexual and sexual reproduction in different species, by:

A.1.2.1.b: describing mechanisms of sexual reproduction (e.g., cross-fertilization in seed plants, sexual reproduction in mammals)

Pollination: Flower to Fruit

A.1.2.1.c: describing examples of organisms that show both sexual and asexual reproduction (e.g., yeasts that reproduce both by budding and sexual reproduction; plants that reproduce through suckering, runners or bulbs, as well as by seed production)

Pollination: Flower to Fruit

A.1.2.1.d: describing the formation of zygote and embryo in plant and animal reproduction

Pollination: Flower to Fruit

A.1.2.3: investigate the transmission of characteristics from parents to offspring, and identify examples of characteristics in offspring that are:

A.1.2.3.a: the same as the characteristics of both parents

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

A.1.2.3.b: the same as the characteristics of one parent

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

A.1.2.3.c: intermediate between parent characteristics

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

A.1.2.3.d: different from both parents

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium

A.1.2.5: identify examples of dominant and recessive characteristics and recognize that dominance and recessiveness provide only a partial explanation for the variation of characteristics in offspring

Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

A.1.3: Describe, in general terms, the role of genetic materials in the continuity and variation of species characteristics; and investigate and interpret related technologies

A.1.3.1: describe, in general terms, the role and relationship of chromosomes, genes and DNA

Human Karyotyping

A.1.3.4: distinguish between, and identify examples of, natural and artificial selection (e.g., evolution of beak shapes in birds, development of high milk production in dairy cows)

Evolution: Mutation and Selection
Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
Microevolution
Natural Selection
Rainfall and Bird Beaks - Metric

A.1.4: Identify impacts of human action on species survival and variation within species, and analyze related issues for personal and public decision making

A.1.4.1: describe the relative abundance of species on Earth and in different environments (e.g., note the overall abundance of insect species; note that in harsh environments there are relatively fewer species found than in temperate and tropical environments)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

A.1.4.2: describe ongoing changes in biological diversity through extinction and extirpation of native species, and investigate the role of environmental factors in causing these changes (e.g., investigate the effect of changing river characteristics on the variety of species living in the river; investigate the effect of changing land use on the survival of wolf or grizzly bear populations)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

A.1.4.3: evaluate the success and limitations of various local and global strategies for minimizing loss of species diversity (e.g., breeding of endangered populations in zoos, development of seed banks, designating protected areas, development of international treaties regulating trade of protected species and animal parts)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

A.1.4.4: investigate and describe the use of biotechnology in environmental, agricultural or forest management; and identify potential impacts and issues (e.g., investigate issues related to the development of patented crop varieties and varieties that require extensive chemical treatments; identify issues related to selective breeding in game farming and in the rearing of fish stocks)

Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection

A.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on the use of research and inquiry skills to inform the decision-making process)

A.2.1: Initiating and Planning

A.2.1.1: Ask questions about the relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

A.2.1.1.b: identify questions to investigate arising from science-related issues (e.g., â??What factors affect the ability of organisms to survive and reproduce in this ecosystem?â??)

Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A.2.1.1.c: state a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events (e.g., predict changes to an area of local parkland that is subject to intense use; hypothesize means of impact, such as soil compaction and disturbance of nest sites)

Seed Germination
Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

A.2.1.1.d: define and delimit questions and problems to facilitate investigation (e.g., delimit an electronic search for information on species survival by framing a question about a specific group of organisms or a specific ecosystem)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A.2.3: Analyzing and Interpreting

A.2.3.1: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

A.2.3.1.b: interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer and explain relationships among the variables (e.g., interpret data on changing animal populations, and infer possible causes)

Food Chain
Pendulum Clock
Rabbit Population by Season
Seed Germination

A.2.4: Communication and Teamwork

A.2.4.1: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

A.2.4.1.a: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., illustrate and compare methods of reproduction in sample organisms studied)

Identifying Nutrients

A.2.4.1.b: evaluate individual and group processes used in investigating an issue and evaluating alternative decisions (e.g., evaluate strategies for locating information, such as the use of particular key words or search tools; evaluate approaches for sharing work on a given research task and for synthesizing the information found)

Estimating Population Size
Pendulum Clock

A.3: Attitude Outcomes

A.3.1: Interest in Science

A.3.1.1: Show interest in science-related questions and issues, and confidently pursue personal interests and career possibilities within science-related fields (e.g., select and explore media on topics related to species diversity; express interest in hobbies and careers that involve the care, culture and study of living things)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

B: Matter and Chemical Change (Nature of Science Emphasis)

B.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

B.1.1: Investigate materials, and describe them in terms of their physical and chemical properties

B.1.1.1: investigate and describe properties of materials (e.g., investigate and describe the melting point, solubility and conductivity of materials observed)

Circuit Builder

B.1.2: Describe and interpret patterns in chemical reactions

B.1.2.4: observe and describe patterns of chemical change, by:

B.1.2.4.a: observing heat generated or absorbed in chemical reactions, and identifying examples of exothermic and endothermic reactions

Chemical Changes

B.1.2.4.b: identifying conditions that affect rates of reactions (e.g., investigate and describe how factors such as heat, concentration, surface area and electrical energy can affect a chemical reaction)

Collision Theory

B.1.2.4.c: identifying evidence for conservation of mass in chemical reactions, and demonstrating and describing techniques by which that evidence is gathered.

Chemical Changes
Chemical Equations

B.1.3: Describe ideas used in interpreting the chemical nature of matter, both in the past and present, and identify example evidence that has contributed to the development of these ideas

B.1.3.1: demonstrate understanding of the origins of the periodic table, and relate patterns in the physical and chemical properties of elements to their positions in the periodic tableâ??focusing on the first 18 elements

Electron Configuration

B.1.3.3: use the periodic table to identify the number of protons, electrons and other information about each atom; and describe, in general terms, the relationship between the structure of atoms in each group and the properties of elements in that group (e.g., use the periodic table to determine that sodium has 11 electrons and protons and, on average, about 12 neutrons; infer that different rows (periods) on the table reflect differences in atomic structure; interpret information on ion charges provided in some periodic tables) [Note: Knowledge of specific orbital structures for elements and groups of elements is not required at this grade level.]

Electron Configuration
Element Builder

B.1.3.4: distinguish between ionic and molecular compounds, and describe the properties of some common examples of each

Covalent Bonds
Ionic Bonds

B.1.4: Apply simplified chemical nomenclature in describing elements, compounds and chemical reactions

B.1.4.1: read and interpret chemical formulas for compounds of two elements, and give the IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) name and common name of these compounds (e.g., give, verbally and in writing, the name for NaCl(s) (sodium chloride), CO2(g) (carbon dioxide), MgO(s) (magnesium oxide), NH3(g) (nitrogen trihydride or ammonia), CH4(g) (carbon tetrahydride or methane), FeCl2(s) (iron(II) chloride), FeCl3(s) (iron(III) chloride)

Chemical Equations
Ionic Bonds

B.1.4.2: identify/describe chemicals commonly found in the home, and write the chemical symbols (e.g., table salt [NaCl(s)], water [H2O(l)], sodium hydroxide [NaOH(aq)] used in household cleaning supplies)

Ionic Bonds

B.1.4.3: identify examples of combining ratios/number of atoms per molecule found in some common materials, and use information on ion charges to predict combining ratios in ionic compounds of two elements (e.g., identify the number of atoms per molecule signified by the chemical formulas for CO(g) and CO2(g); predict combining ratios of iron and oxygen based on information on ion charges of iron and oxygen)

Chemical Equations

B.1.4.4: assemble or draw simple models of molecular and ionic compounds (e.g., construct models of some carbon compounds using toothpicks, peas and cubes of potato) [Note: Diagrams and models should show the relative positions of atoms. Diagrams of orbital structures are not required at this grade level.]

Covalent Bonds
Ionic Bonds

B.1.4.5: describe familiar chemical reactions, and represent these reactions by using word equations and chemical formulas and by constructing models of reactants and products (e.g., describe combustion reactions, such as: carbon + oxygen --> carbon dioxide [C(s) + O2(g) --> CO2(g)]; describe corrosion reactions, such as: iron + oxygen --> iron(II) oxide [Fe(s) + O2(g) --> FeO(s)]; describe replacement reactions, such as the following: zinc + copper(II) sulfate--> zinc sulfate + copper [Zn(s) + CuSO4(aq) --> ZnSO4(aq) + Cu(s)]) [Note 1: This outcome does not require students to explain the formation of polyatomic ions. Some chemicals with polyatomic ions may nevertheless be introduced; e.g., a brief introduction to CuSO4(s), ZnSO4(s) and H2SO4(aq) can help prepare students for further study of these materials in units C and D.] [Note 2: At this grade level, students are not required to balance reactants and products in chemical equations. Teachers may want to inform students about opportunities for further study of chemistry in Science 10 and in Science 14-24.]

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Changes
Chemical Equations
Equilibrium and Concentration

B.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on scientific inquiry)

B.2.1: Initiating and Planning

B.2.1.1: Ask questions about the relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

B.2.1.1.a: identify questions to investigate (e.g., ask questions about the reactivity of particular materials or about conditions that affect the rate of reaction, after observing that materials react at different rates)

Collision Theory
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

B.2.1.1.b: define and delimit questions and problems to facilitate investigation (e.g., reframe a general question, such as: â??What affects the speed of reactions?â?? to become one or more specific questions, such as: â??How will temperature affect the rate of reaction between materials x and y?â?? or â??How will moisture affect the rate of reaction between x and y?â??)

Collision Theory
Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

B.2.1.1.c: state a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events

Seed Germination
Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

B.2.1.1.d: select appropriate methods and tools for collecting data and information and for solving problems (e.g., plan and conduct a search for information about chemical elements, using appropriate print and electronic sources)

Triple Beam Balance

B.2.2: Performing and Recording

B.2.2.1: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

B.2.2.1.a: carry out procedures, controlling the major variables (e.g., investigate the effect of particle size on a chemical reaction, taking care to identify and control other potentially relevant variables)

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Seed Germination

B.2.3: Analyzing and Interpreting

B.2.3.1: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

B.2.3.1.a: compile and display data, by hand or computer, in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, bar graphs, line graphs and scatterplots (e.g., present data on different chemical substances in a form that facilitates interpretation)

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station
Identifying Nutrients

B.2.3.1.b: calculate theoretical values of a variable (e.g., predict the total mass of the products of a chemical reaction, based on the mass of the reactants used) [Note: In this example, students can apply the law of conservation of mass.]

Chemical Equations
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock

B.2.3.1.d: state a conclusion, based on experimental data, and explain how evidence gathered supports or refutes an initial idea

Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock
Seed Germination
Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

C: Environmental Chemistry (Social and Environmental Emphasis)

C.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

C.1.2: Identify processes for measuring the quantity of different substances in the environment and for monitoring air and water quality

C.1.2.1: identify substrates and nutrient sources for living things within a variety of environments

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

C.1.2.2: describe and illustrate the use of biological monitoring as one method for determining environmental quality (e.g., assess water quality, by observing the relative abundance of various vertebrate and invertebrate species)

Pond Ecosystem

C.1.2.5: identify acids, bases and neutral substances, based on measures of their pH (e.g., use indicator solutions or pH meters to measure the pH of water samples)

Titration
pH Analysis
pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

C.1.2.6: investigate, safely, and describe the effects of acids and bases on each other and on other substances (e.g., investigate and describe the reaction that results when baking powder is dissolved; describe the role of acids and bases in neutralizing each other)

Titration

C.1.3: Analyze and evaluate mechanisms affecting the distribution of potentially harmful substances within an environment

C.1.3.1: describe mechanisms for the transfer of materials through air, water and soil; and identify factors that may accelerate or retard distribution (e.g., wind speed, soil porosity)

Porosity

C.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on the use of research and inquiry skills to inform the decision-making process)

C.2.1: Initiating and Planning

C.2.1.1: Ask questions about the relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

C.2.1.1.b: identify questions arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., ask questions about the needs of different living things for nutrients and about the mechanisms by which these nutrients are obtained)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

C.2.2: Performing and Recording

C.2.2.1: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

C.2.2.1.c: use instruments and materials effectively and accurately for collecting data (e.g., measure and compare the pH in household products, foods and environments)

Triple Beam Balance

C.2.2.1.d: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or experiment

Diffusion
Seed Germination

D: Electrical Principles and Technologies (Science and Technology Emphasis)

D.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

D.1.1: Investigate and interpret the use of devices to convert various forms of energy to electrical energy, and electrical energy to other forms of energy

D.1.1.1: identify, describe and interpret examples of mechanical, chemical, thermal, electrical and light energy

Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
Roller Coaster Physics
Temperature and Particle Motion

D.1.1.2: investigate and describe evidence of energy transfer and transformation (e.g., mechanical energy transformed into electrical energy, electrical energy transferred through power grids, chemical energy converted to electrical energy and then to light energy in a flashlight, thermal energy converted to electrical energy in a thermocouple)

Energy of a Pendulum
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

D.1.1.5: modify the design of an electrical device, and observe and evaluate resulting changes (e.g., investigate the effect of changes in the orientation and placement of magnets, commutator and armature in a St. Louis motor or in a personally-built model of a motor)

Trebuchet

D.1.2: Describe technologies for transfer and control of electrical energy

D.1.2.3: identify electrical conductors and insulators, and compare the resistance of different materials to electric flow (e.g., compare the resistance of copper wire and nickel-chromium/Nichrome wire; investigate the conduction of electricity through different solutions; investigate applications of electrical resistance in polygraph or lie detector tests)

Circuit Builder

D.1.2.6: measure voltages and amperages in circuits (e.g., determine the resistance in a circuit with a dry cell and miniature light; determine the resistances of copper, nickel-chromium/ Nichrome wire, pencil leads and salt solution)

D.1.2.6.a: apply Ohmâ??s law to calculate resistance, voltage and current in simple circuits

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

D.1.2.7: develop, test and troubleshoot circuit designs for a variety of specific purposes, based on low voltage circuits (e.g., develop and test a device that is activated by a photoelectric cell; develop a model hoist that will lift a load to a given level, then stop and release its load; test and evaluate the use of series and parallel circuits for wiring a set of lights)

Advanced Circuits
Circuit Builder
Circuits

D.1.2.9: identify similarities and differences between microelectronic circuits and circuits in a house (e.g., compare switches in a house with transistors in a microcircuit)

Circuit Builder
Circuits

D.1.3: Identify and estimate energy inputs and outputs for example devices and systems, and evaluate the efficiency of energy conversions

D.1.3.2: apply appropriate units, measures and devices in determining and describing quantities of energy transformed by an electrical device, by:

D.1.3.2.a: measuring amperage and voltage, and calculating the number of watts consumed by an electrical device, using the formula P = IV [power (in watts) = current (in amps) Ã? voltage (in volts)]

Household Energy Usage

D.1.3.3: apply the concepts of conservation of energy and efficiency to the analysis of energy devices (e.g., identify examples of energy dissipation in the form of heat, and describe the effect of these losses on useful energy output)

Energy Conversion in a System
Energy of a Pendulum

D.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on problem solving)

D.2.1: Initiating and Planning

D.2.1.1: Ask questions about the relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

D.2.1.1.b: identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., identify questions, such as: â??How can the amount of electric current in a circuit be controlled?â??)

Pendulum Clock

D.2.1.1.d: state a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events (e.g., predict the amount of current in a circuit of known resistance and applied voltage)

Circuit Builder

D.2.2: Performing and Recording

D.2.2.1: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

D.2.2.1.c: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data (e.g., use ammeters and voltmeters)

Triple Beam Balance

D.2.3: Analyzing and Interpreting

D.2.3.1: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

D.2.3.1.b: evaluate designs and prototypes in terms of function, reliability, safety, efficiency, use of materials and impact on the environment (e.g., evaluate the safety, durability, efficiency and environmental impact of a personally-constructed wet cell design)

Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

D.2.3.1.d: identify and suggest explanations for discrepancies in data (e.g., measure the current in similar circuits, and provide possible explanations for differences in current flow)

Circuit Builder

D.2.4: Communication and Teamwork

D.2.4.1: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

D.2.4.1.b: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., use charts to present data on the voltage, current (amperage) and resistance found in series and parallel circuits)

Identifying Nutrients

D.3: Attitude Outcomes

D.3.3: Scientific Inquiry

D.3.3.1: Seek and apply evidence when evaluating alternative approaches to investigations, problems and issues (e.g., strive to assess a problem or situation accurately, by careful analysis of evidence gathered; ask questions to clarify meaning or confirm their understanding; report the limitations of their designs; continue working on a problem or research project until the best possible solutions or answers are found)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

D.3.5: Stewardship

D.3.5.1: Demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and a sustainable environment (e.g., objectively identify potential conflicts between responding to human wants and needs and protecting the environment)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

E: Space Exploration (Science and Technology Emphasis)

E.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

E.1.1: Investigate and describe ways that human understanding of Earth and space has depended on technological development

E.1.1.5: describe and apply techniques for determining the position and motion of objects in space, including:

E.1.1.5.a: constructing and interpreting drawings and physical models that illustrate the motion of objects in space (e.g., represent the orbit of comets around the Sun, using a looped-string model)

Orbital Motion - Kepler's Laws

E.1.1.5.b: describing in general terms how parallax and the Doppler effect are used to estimate distances of objects in space and to determine their motion

Doppler Shift
Doppler Shift Advanced

2D Collisions
3D Eclipse
Air Track

2D Collisions
3D Eclipse
Air Track

2D Collisions
3D Eclipse
Air Track

E.1.2: Identify problems in developing technologies for space exploration, describe technologies developed for life in space, and explain the scientific principles involved

E.1.2.4: identify materials and processes developed to meet needs in space, and identify related applications (e.g., medicines, remote sensing, microelectronics, polymers, medical imaging, wireless communication technologies, synthesis of fuels)

Human Karyotyping

E.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on problem solving)

E.2.1: Initiating and Planning

E.2.1.1: Ask questions about the relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

E.2.1.1.c: state a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events (e.g., predict the next appearance of a comet, based on past observations; develop a hypothesis about the geologic history of a planet or its moon, based on recent data)

Seed Germination
Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

E.2.2: Performing and Recording

E.2.2.1: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

E.2.2.1.c: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or experiment (e.g., maintain a log of observed changes in the night sky; prepare a data table to compare various planets)

Diffusion
Identifying Nutrients
Seed Germination

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.