1: Force, Motion, and Energy

1.1: Projectiles

1.1.1: analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the horizontal and vertical motion of a projectile

1.1.1.a: define projectile motion

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

1.1.1.b: solve problems finding

1.1.1.b.i: vx and vy at any point along the path

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

1.1.1.b.ii: the range

Golf Range

1.1.1.b.iii: the maximum height

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

1.1.1.b.iv: the final and/or initial velocity (magnitude and direction)

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

1.1.1.b.v: flight time

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

1.1.1.c: sketch the x and y displacement, velocity and acceleration vectors components at any point in the projectile

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

1.1.3: identify questions to investigate that arise from practical problems and issues

Pendulum Clock

1.1.4: compile and organize data, using data tables and graphs, to facilitate interpretation of the data

Determining a Spring Constant
Seasons Around the World

1.1.5: define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation

Pendulum Clock

1.1.6: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data

Triple Beam Balance

1.1.11: define and delimit problems, estimate quantities, and interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer or calculate the relationship among variables.

Pendulum Clock

1.2: Newtonâ??s Laws

1.2.1: apply Newtonâ??s laws of motion in two dimensions

1.2.1.b: define an inclined plane and coordinate rotation

Inclined Plane - Rolling Objects
Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

1.2.1.c: solve problems for both frictional and non-frictional inclined planes

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

1.2.1.d: solve problems involving strings and pulleys; on both horizontal surfaces and inclined planes

Pulley Lab

1.3: Uniform Circular Motion

1.3.1: describe uniform circular motion using algebraic and vector analysis

1.3.1.a: define uniform circular motion (UCM) and centripetal acceleration using the formulae v=2(pi)r/T and ac=v²/x and when these are used in combination.

Uniform Circular Motion

1.3.1.b: solve problems involving centripetal acceleration

Uniform Circular Motion

1.3.2: explain quantitatively uniform circular motion using Newtonâ??s laws

1.3.2.a: define centripetal force

Uniform Circular Motion

1.3.2.b: solve problems involving centripetal force/acceleration on a horizontal surface and at the top and bottom of a vertical circle

Uniform Circular Motion

1.3.3: define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation

Pendulum Clock

1.3.4: compile and display evidence and information in a variety of formats, including tables, graphs, and scatter plots

Seasons Around the World

1.3.5: interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer or calculate linear and non-linear relationships among variables

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

1.3.6: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data

Triple Beam Balance

1.4: Static Equilibrium and Torque

1.4.1: use vector analysis in two dimensions for systems involving two or more masses, static equilibrium, and torques

1.4.1.a: define

1.4.1.a.ii: rotational equilibrium

Torque and Moment of Inertia

1.4.1.a.iii: static equilibrium

Diffusion

1.4.1.b: define center of mass

2D Collisions

1.4.2: interpret patterns and trends in data, and calculate relationships among variables

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

1.4.3: define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation

Pendulum Clock

1.4.4: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data

Triple Beam Balance

1.4.6: use vector analysis in two dimensions for systems involving two or more masses, static equilibrium, and torques

1.4.6.a: define torque (moment of force)

Torque and Moment of Inertia

1.4.6.b: calculate torque when forces are applied either perpendicularly or at an angle

Torque and Moment of Inertia

1.4.6.c: solve static equilibrium problems: balancing forces and torques

Torque and Moment of Inertia

2: Fields

2.1: Gravitational and Electric Fields

2.1.2: explain the production of static electricity and its properties

2.1.2.a: define electrostatic forces

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

2.1.2.c: state the law of electric charges

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

2.1.2.i: discuss the nature of electrical discharge

Electromagnetic Induction

2.1.4: interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer relationships among variables

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

2.1.5: display evidence in a variety of formats, including diagrams, tables, and graphs

Seasons Around the World

2.1.6: compare Newtonâ??s Law of universal gravitation with Coulombâ??s Law, and apply both laws quantitatively

2.1.6.a: state Coulombâ??s Law of electric force in sentence and in formula form

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

2.1.6.d: given four of: distance separating two charged particles, charge on each, force between them, and Coulombâ??s constant, calculate the fifth quantity

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

2.1.6.e: calculate the electric force on a charged particle due to the presence of other charges when (i) all charges are on a common straight line, and (ii) when these other charges are on perpendicular lines that intersect at the first charged particle

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

2.1.7: describe electric fields as regions of space that affect charges (like and unlike), and illustrate the source and direction of the lines of force

2.1.7.f: given the two of the electric field, the size of a positive test charge, and the electric force on it, calculate the third quantity

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

2.1.7.h: given three of: the charge of a particle or sphere, Coulombâ??s constant, the distance from the particle or sphere at which the field is specified, and the value of that field, calculate the fourth quantity

Coulomb Force (Static)
Pith Ball Lab

2.1.7.j: extend the work-energy theorem to develop the concept of electric potential energy

Pulley Lab

2.2: Electric Circuits

2.2.1: apply Ohmâ??s Law to series, parallel, and combination circuits

2.2.1.f: state Ohmâ??s Law

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

2.2.1.l: draw a schematic diagram for series, parallel and simple combination circuits

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

2.2.1.q: use the equation for the effective value of resistance in series and parallel circuits. Include:

2.2.1.q.i: RT = R1 + R2 + R3 +..

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

2.2.1.q.ii: 1/RT = 1/R1+1/R2+1/R3+...

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

2.2.1.r: solve exercises with problems involving circuits with both series and parallel combinations of resistors

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

2.2.2: define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation

Pendulum Clock

2.2.4: compile and display evidence and information in a variety of formats, including diagrams, and tables

Seasons Around the World

2.2.5: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data

Triple Beam Balance

2.3: Magnetic Fields

2.3.2: describe the magnetic field produced by a current in both a solenoid and a long, straight conductor

2.3.2.g: explain the role of magnetic permeability of the core and its effects on electromagnetism

Electromagnetic Induction

2.3.4: analyze qualitatively and quantitatively electromagnetic induction by both changing magnetic flux and a moving conductor

2.3.4.a: state Faradayâ??s law of electromagnetic induction

Electromagnetic Induction

2.3.4.d: explain Faradayâ??s Iron Ring apparatus

Electromagnetic Induction

2.3.4.e: state Lenzâ??s Law

Electromagnetic Induction

2.3.4.f: use Lenzâ??s Law to predict the direction of induced currents

Electromagnetic Induction

2.3.4.g: apply Faradayâ??s Law and Lenzâ??s Law in determining the direction of current in a loop of an electric generator

Electromagnetic Induction

2.4: Electromagnetism

2.4.3: carry out procedures controlling the major variables and extending procedures where required

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

2.4.4: interpret patterns and trends in data and infer relationships among variables

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

2.4.7: identify, analyze and describe examples where technologies were developed based on scientific understanding, their design and function as part of a communityâ??s life and science and technology related careers.

Electromagnetic Induction

3: Matter Energy Interface

3.1: Quantum Physics

3.1.2: describe how the quantum energy concept explains both black-body radiation and the photoelectric effect

3.1.2.b: define qualitatively the photoelectric effect

Photoelectric Effect

3.1.3: explain qualitatively and apply the formula for the photoelectric effect

3.1.3.b: define and calculate the stopping potential

Photoelectric Effect

3.1.3.d: define and calculate the work function

Photoelectric Effect

3.1.3.e: relate the energy of the incident light (photon) to the work function

Photoelectric Effect

3.2: Compton and de Broglie

3.2.1: explain that qualitatively the Bohr atomic model is a synthesis of classical and quantum concepts

3.2.1.a: describe qualitatively how the Bohr model of the atom explains emission and absorption spectra

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Star Spectra

3.2.1.b: describe qualitatively and quantitatively Bohrâ??s radius

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Electron Configuration

3.2.1.c: define qualitatively and quantitatively the energy of an electron in Bohrâ??s atom

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Electron Configuration

3.3: Bohr Atoms and Quantum Atoms

3.3.1: explain the relationship among the energy levels in Bohrâ??s model, the energy difference between levels, and the energy of the emitted photons

3.3.1.a: do calculations to determine energy lost/gained of an electron as it jumps up or down various orbits

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Electron Configuration

3.3.1.b: do calculations to determine the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation released/required when an electron jumps various orbits

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction

3.3.3: summarize the evidence for the wave and particle models of light

3.3.3.b: define wave-particle duality

Photoelectric Effect

3.3.3.c: give evidence of light being both a wave: behaviour of long wavelengths, interference and diffraction, or a particle: behaviour of short wavelengths, photoelectric effect, Compton effect, line spectra, blackbody radiation

Photoelectric Effect

3.4: Particles and Waves

3.4.2: describe the products of radioactive decay, and the characteristics of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation

3.4.2.b: define transmutations and radioactivity

Nuclear Decay

3.4.2.c: define alpha decay, beta minus decay and beta positive decay, electron capture and gamma decay

Nuclear Decay

3.4.2.d: identify reaction type and balance nuclear reactions with one reactant or product missing

Nuclear Decay

3.5: Natural and Artificial Sources of Radiation

3.5.1: analyze data on radioactive decay to predict half-life

3.5.1.a: define half-life

Half-life

3.5.1.b: complete half-life calculations using A= Ao (1/2) t/T 1/2

Half-life

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.