1: Life Science: Sustainability of Ecosystems

1.1: How does sustainability fit into your paradigm and societyâ??s paradigm?

1.1.2: communicate questions, ideas and intentions and receive, interpret, understand, support and respond to the ideas of others with respect to environmental attitudes

1.1.2.a: define a paradigm and paradigm shift

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.2: What are the factors affecting the sustainability of an ecosystem?

1.2.1: explain biotic and abiotic factors that keep natural populations in equilibrium and relate this equilibrium to the resource limits of an ecosystem

1.2.1.c: define abiotic factors (include space, temperature, oxygen, light, water, inorganic and organic soil nutrients)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.2.1.d: define biotic factors (include decomposing animals, disease, predator/prey, competition, symbiosis)

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem

1.2.2: select, compile and display evidence and information from various sources, in different formats, to support a given view in a presentation about ecosystem change

1.2.2.d: examine the flow of energy in ecosystems using the concept of the pyramid of energy

Food Chain

1.2.3: describe and apply classification systems and nomenclature with respect to trophic levels in ecosystems

1.2.3.a: define niche and relate it to habitat

Forest Ecosystem

1.2.3.b: classify organisms as producer, consumer, autotroph, heterotroph, decomposer, herbivore, carnivore, omnivore, saprobe

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem

1.2.3.e: describe the feeding relationships in terms of competition, food chains and food webs

Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem

1.2.4: explain how biodiversity of an ecosystem contributes to its sustainability

1.2.4.a: demonstrate how the many interrelated food chains give a community stability and identify the conditions required for a stable self sustaining ecosystem

Food Chain

1.3: Sustainability Issues in an Ecosystem

1.3.1: illustrate the cycling of matter through biotic and abiotic components of an ecosystem by tracking carbon, nitrogen and oxygen

1.3.1.a: diagram the carbon cycle and describe the processes required to cycle from carbon reservoirs to the atmosphere

Carbon Cycle
Cell Energy Cycle

1.3.2: plan changes to predict the effects of, and analyse the impact of external factors on an ecosystem

1.3.2.a: describe how humans have altered the carbon, oxygen and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems

Carbon Cycle

1.3.2.b: describe what is being done to negate human impact on these cycles

Carbon Cycle

1.4: Extension to the Biosphere

1.4.1: analyze the impact of external factors on the ecosystem biomes

1.4.1.c: pollution

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.4.1.d: industry/agriculture

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.4.2: explain why the ecosystem may respond differently to short-term stress and long-term change

1.4.2.b: explain the impact that an abnormally dry summer could have on a bog ecosystem

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.4.2.c: describe how ecosystems are able to respond to changes and return to its previous state

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.4.4: describe how soil composition and fertility can be altered and how these changes could affect an ecosystem.

1.4.4.b: describe the potential impact that overuse of fertilizers can have on ecosystems

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.4.5: explain why ecosystems with similar characteristic can exist in different geographical locations

1.4.5.b: discuss how abiotic factors affect the distribution of organisms

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.4.5.c: discuss the reasons for ecosystems that share similar abiotic features also sharing similar animal life

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

2: Earth and Space Science: Weather Dynamics

2.2: What energy source drives the Water Cycle?

2.2.1: identify questions to investigate that arise from considering the energy transferred within the water cycle

2.2.1.b: illustrate the distribution of incoming solar radiation

Seasons Around the World

2.2.1.c: identify that the amount of heat energy absorbed by any material depends on the albedo of the material

Herschel Experiment - Metric

2.2.2: using scientific theory, illustrate and explain heat energy transfers that occur in the water cycle

2.2.2.a: describe and explain how heat energy is transferred by: radiation, conduction, convection and advection

Herschel Experiment - Metric

2.2.5: discuss the design of experiments that compare the magnitude of the specific heat for water with that of its latent heat of fusion and vaporization

2.2.5.a: define latent heat of fusion and latent heat of vaporization

Calorimetry Lab
Phase Changes

3: Physical Science: Chemical Reactions

3.2: An introduction to formula writing.

3.2.1: describe the usefulness of IUPAC scientific nomenclature systems to convey chemical information

3.2.1.e: distinguish between physical and chemical change

Chemical Changes

3.2.3: name and write formulas for some common ionic compounds (both binary and complex), using the periodic table, a list of ions, and appropriate nomenclature for metal and non-metal ions

3.2.3.a: given formulas for ionic compounds (including simple ions and polyatomic ions, ions that can form multiple charges, and ionic hydrates), determine the names of ionic compounds using IUPAC rules and vice versa

Ionic Bonds

3.2.4: classify simple acids, bases and salts on the basis of their names and formulas:

3.2.4.e: define salts as ionic compounds

Ionic Bonds

3.2.5: classify substances as acids, bases, or salts, on the basis of their characteristic properties

3.2.5.a: define pH scale in terms of a measure of acidity or alkalinity or neutrality.

pH Analysis

3.2.5.b: define acids and bases operationally in terms of their effect on litmus paper, pH, sour and bitter taste, reaction with active metals, and reaction with each other

pH Analysis
pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

3.2.6: describe how neutralization involves tempering the effects of an acid with a base and vice versa

Titration

3.3: An introduction to equation writing.

3.3.1: represent chemical reactions and the conservation of mass, using molecular models and balanced symbolic equations

3.3.1.a: write and balance reactions that illustrate a variety of reaction types, including combustion, formation, decomposition, single replacement, and double replacement

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

3.3.1.b: define the law of conservation of mass

Chemical Changes
Chemical Equations

3.3.1.c: list the four pieces of evidence for a chemical reaction

Chemical Changes
Equilibrium and Concentration

3.3.1.d: predict the products of chemical reactions, indicating the phase of all reactants and products (including the use of a solubility table for reactions in solution)

Equilibrium and Concentration

4: Physical Science - Motion

4.1: Investigating Velocity

4.1.5: identify and explain sources of errors and uncertainty in measurement, and express results in a form that acknowledges the degree of uncertainty

4.1.5.a: record measurements using appropriate number of significant digits.

Unit Conversions 2 - Scientific Notation and Significant Digits

4.1.5.b: demonstrate the proper use of significant digits during calculations

Unit Conversions 2 - Scientific Notation and Significant Digits

4.1.5.c: express measurements in scientific notation when appropriate.

Unit Conversions 2 - Scientific Notation and Significant Digits

4.1.6: describe quantitatively, and analyze both graphically and mathematically, the relationship among distance, time, and speed of an objectâ??s linear motion

4.1.6.c: explain what is meant by instantaneous speed

Free-Fall Laboratory

4.1.6.e: given the distance-time data, plot a d/t graph, appropriately labeled with the dependent and independent variables correctly placed

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

4.1.6.f: determine the slope of a d/t graph and state the physical significance of the slope

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

4.1.6.g: for a uniformly moving object, plot a speed-time graph and explain the physical significance of the y-intercept and the area under the graph

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

4.1.6.h: determine speed from a distance/time graph, and determine distance from a speed/time graph

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.1.7: predict the time taken for a moving object to complete a course on the basis of initial measurements, estimated values, and an understanding of the displacement, time, and, velocity relationship

Free-Fall Laboratory
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

4.2: Investigate the Relationship Between Velocity, Time and Acceleration

4.2.1: describe quantitatively, and analyze both graphically and mathematically, the relationship among displacement, time, and velocity of an objectâ??s uniform motion

4.2.1.a: distinguish between scalar and vector quantities, using distance and displacement, and speed and velocity, respectively, as examples.

Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey
Vectors

4.2.1.c: given two (or a means of finding two) of average velocity, displacement and elapsed time, calculate the third quantity

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.1.d: determine velocity from a position-time graph, and determine displacement from a velocity-time graph

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.1.e: determine the direction of motion (positive or negative) of a uniformly moving object from its position-time graph, and its velocity-time graph

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.2: distinguish between average velocity and instantaneous velocity

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.3: use instruments for collecting data on uniformly accelerated linear motion effectively and accurately

4.2.3.a: from the data obtained in the core lab, plot a position-time graph

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.3.c: determine the instantaneous velocity by taking the slope of a tangent drawn to the curve at a selected position or time on the graph and use velocities obtained in this way to plot a velocity-time graph

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

4.2.4: describe quantitatively, and analyze both graphically and mathematically, the relationship among velocity, time, and acceleration

4.2.4.b: explain what is meant by uniform or constant acceleration and explain why it is a vector quantity

Atwood Machine
Golf Range
Shoot the Monkey

4.2.4.d: use the definition of acceleration to determine acceleration, initial velocity, final velocity, or time, given the other three

Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.4.e: relate the slope of a linear velocity-time graph to the acceleration

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric

4.2.4.f: calculate the area of a velocity-time graph and relate it to the objectâ??s displacement

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.4.g: given the velocity-time graph for a uniformly accelerating object, determine its initial velocity and its acceleration

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.4.h: explain how one can tell from the position-time graph whether the magnitude of an objectâ??s velocity is increasing, decreasing, or constant

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.2.4.i: determine, at any time, the instantaneous velocity from a displacement/time graph for an object with zero acceleration or uniform acceleration.

Distance-Time and Velocity-Time Graphs - Metric
Free-Fall Laboratory

4.4: Present and Future Development

4.4.2: identify areas of further study related to science and technology of motion

Roller Coaster Physics

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

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