1: Water Systems on Earthâ??s Surface

1.1: Water Cycleâ??s Vital Role

1.1.1: describe major interactions among the hydrosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere

1.1.1.b: label a diagram of the water cycle

Water Cycle

1.4: Exploration of Ocean Basins

1.4.1: describe processes that lead to the development of ocean basins and continental drainage systems. Include:

1.4.1.i: volcanic action

Plate Tectonics

1.4.1.ii: plate tectonics

Plate Tectonics

1.5: Ocean Currents

1.5.4: interpret trends in data, and explain relationships among the variables

Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

1.8: Tides

1.8.1: explain how waves and tides are generated

1.8.1.a: define tide

Tides - Metric

1.8.1.b: explain and illustrate how tides are generated by the gravitational pull of the moon

Tides - Metric

1.8.1.c: define tidal range

Tides - Metric

1.8.1.d: distinguish between spring tides and neap tides

Tides - Metric

1.10: Oceans, Weather and Climate

1.10.1: describe the interactions of the ocean currents, winds, and regional climates

1.10.1.c: describe how convection affects weather

Coastal Winds and Clouds - Metric

1.10.1.d: describe how oceans moderate climate

Coastal Winds and Clouds - Metric

1.11: Water Systems and Species Distributions

1.11.1: analyze factors that affect productivity and species distribution in freshwater and marine environments

Pond Ecosystem

1.11.2: identify the effects of abiotic factors on plant and animal distributions in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Include:

1.11.2.i: temperature

Pond Ecosystem

1.11.2.ii: dissolved oxygen

Pond Ecosystem

1.11.2.iii: phosphates

Pond Ecosystem

1.11.2.iv: pH

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.11.2.vi: pollution

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem
Water Pollution

1.11.4: interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer and explain relationships among the variables

Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem
Seed Germination

2: Optics

2.2: Properties of Visible Light

2.2.1: identify and describe properties of visible light. Include the following properties, definitions and examples:

2.2.1.i: travels in a straight line (rectilinear propagation) e.g. shadow formation

Penumbra Effect

2.2.1.ii: reflects (reflection) e.g. mirrors (specular) and dust (diffuse)

Laser Reflection
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

2.2.1.iii: refracts (refraction) e.g. bent stick effect

Basic Prism
Refraction

2.2.1.iv: disperses (dispersion) e.g. formation of a rainbow as light separates into its constituent colors

Basic Prism

2.2.1.v: travels through a vacuum (does not require a medium) e.g. light from sun and stars reaching earth through space

Basic Prism
Refraction

2.3: Electromagnetic Radiation and Dispersion

2.3.1: identify and evaluate potential applications of what was learned concerning refraction

2.3.1.b: define the visible light spectrum

Herschel Experiment - Metric

2.3.2: recognize the importance of using the words frequency and wavelength correctly

2.3.2.a: define frequency

Ripple Tank

2.3.2.b: define wavelength

Ripple Tank

2.4: The Electromagnetic Spectrum

2.4.1: identify the different types of electromagnetic radiation, including infrared, ultraviolet, X-rays, microwaves, and radio waves

2.4.1.a: describe the electromagnetic spectrum in terms of wavelength, frequency, and energy. Include, in order of decreasing wavelength (increasing frequency):

2.4.1.a.iii: infrared

Herschel Experiment - Metric
Radiation

2.4.1.a.iv: visible light

Herschel Experiment - Metric
Radiation

2.5: Reflection

2.5.1: formulate operational definitions for incidence, reflection, and the normal

2.5.1.a: define:

2.5.1.a.iv: angle of incidence

Laser Reflection
Refraction

2.5.3: use mirrors effectively and accurately for investigating the characteristics of images formed

Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

2.5.4: define and delimit questions and problems to facilitate investigation

Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

2.6: Ray Diagrams

2.6.1: estimate angles of incidence and reflection

2.6.1.a: recognize that the angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection

Laser Reflection

2.6.1.b: state the Law of Reflection

Longitudinal Waves
Ripple Tank

2.6.1.c: recognize that a ray diagram is a useful way to represent the behavior of light

Refraction

2.7: Types of Mirrors

2.7.1: construct a classification key of mirrors

2.7.1.a: describe three types of mirrors. Include:

2.7.1.a.ii: concave

Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

2.7.1.a.iii: convex

Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

2.7.1.b: provide examples of each type of mirror. Include:

2.7.1.b.i: bathroom mirror (plane)

Laser Reflection

2.7.1.b.ii: inside of a metal spoon (concave)

Laser Reflection
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

2.7.1.b.iii: safety mirror on the front of a school bus (convex)

Laser Reflection
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

2.9: Refraction

2.9.2: describe qualitatively how visible light is refracted

2.9.2.a: define the process of light refraction. Include:

2.9.2.a.i: incident ray

Basic Prism
Refraction
Ripple Tank

2.9.2.a.ii: refracted ray

Basic Prism
Refraction
Ripple Tank

2.9.2.a.iii: angle of incidence

Refraction

2.9.2.a.iv: angle of refraction

Basic Prism
Refraction
Ripple Tank

2.10: Angles of Incidence and Refraction

2.10.1: estimate angles of incidence and refraction. Include:

2.10.1.ii: as light moves from a more dense medium to a less dense medium

Basic Prism

2.10.3: identify that a light ray traveling into a medium of greater density will bend towards the normal, and vice versa

Basic Prism
Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Refraction

2.10.4: predict the effect of transparent media of varying densities on the angle of refraction of light. Include:

2.10.4.i: vegetable oil

Basic Prism
Refraction

2.10.4.ii: water

Basic Prism
Refraction

2.11: Types of Lenses

2.11.1: construct a classification key of lenses

2.11.1.a: describe two types of lenses. Include:

2.11.1.a.i: convex

Ray Tracing (Lenses)

2.11.1.a.ii: concave

Ray Tracing (Lenses)

2.11.1.b: provide examples of each type of lens. Include:

2.11.1.b.ii: eye glasses (convex)

Ray Tracing (Lenses)

2.11.1.b.iii: eye glasses (concave)

Ray Tracing (Lenses)

2.11.1.c: describe how lenses correct near-sightedness and farsightedness

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

3: Fluids

3.4: Defining Density

3.4.1: describe the relationship among the mass, volume, and density of solids, liquids and gases using the Particle Theory

3.4.1.c: define density

Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
Density Laboratory

3.5: Determining Density

3.5.1: analyze quantitatively the density of various substances

3.5.1.a: calculate the density of a material, given mass and volume

Density Laboratory

3.5.1.b: calculate the mass of a material, given density and volume

Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
Density Laboratory

3.5.1.c: calculate the volume of a material, given density and mass

Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
Density Laboratory

3.5.2: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data

Triple Beam Balance

3.5.5: calculate the density of various objects. Include:

3.5.5.i: irregular shaped objects

Determining Density via Water Displacement

3.5.5.ii: liquids

Density Laboratory

3.5.5.iii: granular objects

Density Laboratory

3.5.5.iv: regular shaped objects

Density Laboratory

3.6: Changes in Density

3.6.1: explain the effects of changes in temperature on the density of solids, liquids, and gases and relate the results to the Particle Theory

3.6.1.a: identify examples of density changes (resulting from a temperature change) in everyday life. Include:

3.6.1.a.iii: water in its three states

Density Laboratory

3.6.2: describe situations in life where the density of substances naturally changes or is intentionally changed. Include:

3.6.2.iii: salt water being easier to float in

Archimedes' Principle

3.8: Buoyancy and Buoyant Forces

3.8.1: describe the connection between weight, buoyancy, and sinking or floating

3.8.1.a: define buoyancy

Archimedes' Principle
Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
Density Laboratory

3.8.1.b: apply the concept of balanced and unbalanced forces to the buoyancy and weight of an object to explain why it sinks or floats

Archimedes' Principle

3.9: Applications of Buoyancy

3.9.1: provide examples of technologies that have been developed because of our understanding of density and buoyancy. Include:

3.9.1.a: define average density

Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
Density Laboratory

3.9.1.b: list examples of materials that may sink or float, depending on the application. Include:

3.9.1.b.i: wooden boats vs. a water logged stick

Archimedes' Principle

3.9.1.b.ii: metal block vs. metal boats

Archimedes' Principle

3.9.1.b.iii: a sealed, empty plastic bottle vs. a plastic bottle full of water

Archimedes' Principle

4: Cells, Tissues, Organs and Systems

4.2: Define cell

Cell Structure
Paramecium Homeostasis

4.3: Describe the four characteristics common to living things. Include:

4.3.iii: response to stimuli

Paramecium Homeostasis

4.15: Examine and explain the role of the following organelles:

4.15.i: cell wall

Cell Structure

4.15.ii: cell membrane

Cell Structure

4.15.iii: chloroplast

Cell Energy Cycle
Cell Structure

4.15.iv: cytoplasm

Cell Structure

4.15.v: nucleus

Cell Structure
RNA and Protein Synthesis

4.15.vi: vacuole

Cell Structure
Paramecium Homeostasis

4.15.viii: mitochondria

Cell Structure

4.16: Label organelles on diagrams of typical plant and animal cells.

Cell Structure
RNA and Protein Synthesis

4.17: State the cell theory

Paramecium Homeostasis

4.21: Produce labeled drawings of each type of cell.

Cell Structure

4.22: List three differences between plant and animal cells. Include:

4.22.i: plant cells have chloroplasts

Cell Energy Cycle
Cell Structure

4.22.ii: plant cells have cell walls, therefore they have a regular shape

Cell Structure

4.22.iii: plant cells have fewer, and larger, vacuoles

Cell Structure

4.25: Relate the needs and functions of various cells and organs to the needs and functions of the human organism as a whole.

Cell Structure

4.28: describe these levels of organization found in living things.

4.28.iv: organ systems

Circulatory System

4.31: Identify the main function of the following organ systems in keeping organisms alive.

4.31.i: circulatory

Circulatory System

4.31.iii: digestive

Digestive System

4.33: Explain the roles that diet, nutrition, exercise and stress have on the systems mentioned above.

Circulatory System

4.37: Provide examples of scientific knowledge that have resulted in the development of technologies

Human Karyotyping

4.38: Describe how a communityâ??s needs can lead to developments in science and technology

Human Karyotyping

4.43: State a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events.

Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

4.48: Describe three examples of the interdependence of various systems of the human body. Include:

4.48.i: circulatory/respiratory

Circulatory System

4.48.ii: digestive/circulatory

Circulatory System
Digestive System

4.48.iii: nervous/muscular

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.