RE9: Reproduction and Human Development

RE9.1: Examine the process of and influences on the transfer of genetic information and the impact of that understanding on society past and present.

RE9.1.a: Identify questions to investigate related to genetics.

Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

RE9.1.b: Provide examples of genetic conditions whose causes and cures are not understood according to current scientific and technological knowledge (e.g., some causes of male infertility, cystic fibrosis, Downâ??s syndrome, and muscular dystrophy).

Human Karyotyping

RE9.1.c: Recognize that the nucleus of a cell contains genetic information and identify the relationship among chromosomes, genes, and DNA in transmitting genetic information.

Human Karyotyping
RNA and Protein Synthesis

RE9.1.d: Identify examples of dominant and recessive traits in humans and other living things.

Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

RE9.1.e: Observe, collect, and analyze class and/or family data of human traits that may be inherited from parents (e.g., eye colour, chin shape, ear lobes, and tongue rolling).

Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

RE9.2: Observe and describe the significance of cellular reproductive processes, including mitosis and meiosis.

RE9.2.a: Observe and describe cell division (e.g., binary fission, mitosis, and meiosis) using microscopes, prepared slides, and/or videos.

Cell Division

RE9.2.b: Construct a visual, dramatic, or other representation of the basic process of cell division as part of the cell cycle, including what happens to the cell membrane and the contents of the nucleus.

Cell Division

RE9.2.c: Recognize that the nucleus of a cell determines cellular processes.

RNA and Protein Synthesis

RE9.3: Describe the processes and implications of sexual and asexual reproduction in plants and animals.

RE9.3.f: Describe the process of sexual reproduction in seed plant species, including methods of pollination.

Pollination: Flower to Fruit

AE9: Atoms and Elements

AE9.1: Distinguish between physical and chemical properties of common substances, including those found in household, commercial, industrial, and agricultural applications.

AE9.1.c: Share personal understandings about physical and chemical properties of matter.

Density Experiment: Slice and Dice

AE9.1.d: Investigate common materials and describe them in terms of their physical properties such as smell, colour, melting point, boiling point, density, solubility, ductility, crystal shape, conductivity, hardness, lustre, texture, and malleability.

Circuit Builder
Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
Density Laboratory

AE9.1.j: Differentiate between physical and chemical properties of matter and physical and chemical changes in matter, based on observable evidence.

Chemical Changes

AE9.2: Analyze historical explanations of the structure of matter up to and including: Dalton model; Thomson model; Rutherford model; Bohr model of the atom.

AE9.2.b: Use appropriate scientific terminology when describing atoms and elements (e.g., mass, charge, electron, proton, neutron, nucleus, atom, molecule, element, compound, neutral, positive, negative, ion, isotope, and periodic table).

Element Builder

AE9.2.d: Identify major shifts in understanding matter that have enabled more detailed explanations of the structure and composition of the atom up to and including the Bohr model of the atom.

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction

AE9.2.e: Construct models to illustrate the structure and components of matter, including the major historical atomic models (e.g., Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford, and Bohr), using information selected and synthesized from various sources.

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Element Builder

AE9.2.f: Evaluate individual and group processes used in planning and completing a task related to constructing models of atoms and molecules.

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction

AE9.3: Demonstrate an understanding of the classification of pure substances (elements and compounds), including the development and nature of the Periodic Table.

AE9.3.c: Construct a graphic representation of one or more elements that symbolizes each element in a meaningful way and contains relevant information such as name, atomic number, possible uses, and historical background.

Element Builder

AE9.3.d: Identify examples of common elements (e.g., first 18 elements and K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, I, Ag, Sn, Au, W, Hg, Pb, and U), and compare their atomic structure and physical and chemical properties.

Electron Configuration

AE9.3.g: Write and interpret chemical symbols or formulae of common elements and compounds and identify the elements and number of atoms of each in a given compound (e.g., He, Na, C, H₂O, H₂O₂, CO, CO₂, CaCO₃, SO₂, FeO, NO₂, O₃, CH₄, C₃H₈, NH₃, NaHCO₃, KCl, HCl, H₂SO₄, ZnO, and NaCl).

Ionic Bonds

AE9.3.h: Construct Bohr model representations of the first 18 elements.

Bohr Model of Hydrogen
Bohr Model: Introduction
Element Builder

AE9.3.j: Apply the concept of systems as a tool by interpreting the organizational structure and patterns inherent within the periodic table, including periods, groups (families), atomic mass (mass number), atomic number, metals, non-metals, and metalloids.

Electron Configuration

AE9.3.k: Predict the physical and chemical properties of an element or family of elements (e.g., alkali metals, alkaline-earth metals, hydrogen, halogens, noble gases, and transition metals) based on its position within the periodic table.

Electron Configuration
Ionic Bonds

AE9.3.l: Determine the number of protons and electrons in an atom given the atomic number of an element.

Element Builder

AE9.3.m: Determine the number of electrons, protons, and neutrons of an isotope of an element given the atomic number and mass number of an element.

Element Builder

CE9: Characteristics of Electricity

CE9.1: Demonstrate and analyze characteristics of static electric charge and current electricity, including historical and cultural understanding.

CE9.1.i: Identify dangers to the human body associated with static electric charge and discharge, and current electricity, and discuss how technologies such as grounding straps, lightning rods, grounded plugs, fuses, and circuit breakers are designed to minimize such dangers.

Advanced Circuits

CE9.1.k: Differentiate between conductors, insulators, and superconductors in electric circuits.

Circuit Builder

CE9.1.l: Differentiate between a complete circuit, a closed circuit, an open circuit, and a short circuit.

Circuit Builder
Circuits

CE9.1.m: Describe the flow of charge in an electrical circuit based on the particle theory of matter and electron transfer.

Circuits

CE9.2: Analyze the relationships that exist among voltage, current, and resistance in series and parallel circuits.

CE9.2.b: Demonstrate the role of switches and variable resistors in series and parallel circuits, and identify practical examples of switches and variable resistors in daily life.

Advanced Circuits
Circuit Builder
Circuits

CE9.2.c: Model the characteristics of series and parallel circuits using analogies or visual and/or physical representations.

Advanced Circuits
Circuit Builder
Circuits

CE9.2.d: Use an ammeter, voltmeter, and/or multimeter safely and accurately to measure current and voltage of a variety of student-constructed series and parallel circuits, and identify potential sources of error in instrument readings.

Circuits

CE9.2.e: Display data from the investigation of voltage, current, and resistance in series and parallel circuits in tabular form and graphically.

Advanced Circuits
Circuit Builder
Circuits

CE9.2.f: Calculate values of unknown quantities in electric circuits using Ohmâ??s Law (I = V/R).

Advanced Circuits
Circuits

CE9.2.g: Model, using appropriate standard circuit diagram symbols, series and parallel circuits that include an energy source, one or more switches, and various loads designed to accomplish specific tasks (e.g., household lighting, flashlight, electric fan, blender, coffee maker, toy vehicle, and automotive lighting).

Circuit Builder

CE9.3: Assess operating principles, costs, and efficiencies of devices that produce or use electrical energy.

CE9.3.a: Explain the energy transformations involved in devices that use or produce light, heat, sound, motion, and magnetic effects (e.g., toaster, light bulb, thermocouple, oven, refrigerator, television, hair dryer, kettle, fan, electric blanket, and remote-controlled toy vehicle).

Energy Conversion in a System
Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

EU9: Exploring our Universe

EU9.1: Inquire into the motion and characteristics of astronomical bodies in our solar system and the universe.

EU9.1.a: Pose questions about the characteristics of and relationships between astronomical bodies.

Star Spectra

EU9.1.e: Compare the efficacy of various historical and contemporary models of planetary motion, including geocentric and heliocentric models, for explaining observed astronomical phenomena.

Orbital Motion - Kepler's Laws

EU9.1.i: Describe the effects of solar phenomena, including sunspots, solar flares, and solar radiation, on Earth.

Seasons Around the World

EU9.1.j: Classify the major components of the universe, including stars, quasars, black holes, nebulae, and galaxies, according to their distinguishing physical characteristics.

H-R Diagram
Star Spectra

EU9.1.k: Organize data about the characteristics of the major components of the solar system or universe using tables, spreadsheets, charts, and/or diagrams and draw conclusions about those characteristics specifically and the solar system and universe generally.

Star Spectra

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.