CS8: Cells, Tissues, Organs, and Systems

CS8.1: Analyze the characteristics of cells, and compare structural and functional characteristics of plant and animal cells.

CS8.1.a: Explain that the cell is a living system that exhibits all the characteristics of life including growth, movement, reaction to stimulus, and reproduction.

Cell Division
Cell Structure
Paramecium Homeostasis

CS8.1.b: Categorize organisms as single-celled and multi-cellular.

Paramecium Homeostasis

CS8.1.c: Observe and describe how single-celled organisms take in food and move.

Paramecium Homeostasis

CS8.1.d: Explain how growth and reproduction of living organisms depends on cell division.

Cell Division

CS8.1.f: Model the processes of diffusion and osmosis to demonstrate how gases and water move into and out of plant and animal cells.

Osmosis

CS8.1.g: Observe and identify cell structures (e.g., cell wall, cell membrane, vacuole, nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondria, and chloroplast) and identify which are found in plant cells and which are found in animal cells.

Cell Energy Cycle
Cell Structure
Paramecium Homeostasis
RNA and Protein Synthesis

CS8.1.h: Explain the function of cell structures (e.g., cell wall, cell membrane, vacuole, nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondria, and chloroplast), including how each structure contributes to the health of plant and animal cells.

Cell Structure
Paramecium Homeostasis
RNA and Protein Synthesis

CS8.1.k: Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various representations of the structure and function of plant and animal cells.

Cell Structure

CS8.2: Demonstrate proficiency in the use of a compound light microscope to observe plant and animal cells.

CS8.2.c: Calculate the magnification of a microscope, and estimate and determine the size of objects viewed through a microscope.

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

CS8.3: Distinguish structural and functional relationships among cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems in humans and how this knowledge is important to various careers.

CS8.3.e: Construct a representation of the relationships among cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems in humans using examples from the respiratory, circulatory, digestive, excretory, and nervous systems.

Circulatory System
Digestive System

CS8.3.f: Relate the needs and functions of various cells and organs to the needs and functions of the human organism as a whole.

Digestive System

CS8.4: Analyze how the interdependence of organ systems contributes to the healthy functioning of the human body.

CS8.4.b: Show interest in science-related questions and issues by posing questions and defining practical problems related to the healthy functioning of the human body.

Digestive System

CS8.4.d: Provide examples of how the body reacts to internal and external stimuli such as viruses, bacteria, alcohol, drugs, dust, and temperature changes.

Digestive System
Human Homeostasis
Virus Lytic Cycle

CS8.4.f: Analyze the impact of personal lifestyle choices (e.g., nutrition, exercise, smoking, drugs, and alcohol) on the functions and efficiency of the human respiratory, circulatory, digestive, excretory, and nervous systems.

Circulatory System
Digestive System

CS8.4.g: Predict the impact of the failure or removal of one or more organs on the healthy functioning of the human body.

Digestive System

OP8: Optics and Vision

OP8.1: Identify and describe, through experimentation, sources and properties of visible light including: rectilinear propagation; reflection; refraction.

OP8.1.b: Demonstrate that light is a form of energy, that light can be separated into a visible spectrum, and that light travels in straight lines in a uniform transparent medium.

Basic Prism
Herschel Experiment - Metric
Refraction

OP8.1.c: Investigate the properties of shadows, including umbra and penumbra formation, and demonstrate how the existence of shadows provides evidence that light travels in straight lines.

Penumbra Effect

OP8.1.d: Select appropriate methods and tools and use them safely when collecting data and information to investigate properties of visible light.

Herschel Experiment - Metric
Ripple Tank

OP8.1.e: Estimate and measure angles of incidence and angles of reflection of visible light and determine the quantitative relationship between the angle of incidence and the angle of reflection.

Laser Reflection

OP8.1.f: Investigate characteristics and applications of specular and diffuse reflection, including the absorption of light by surfaces of different colour and made of different materials (e.g., coloured paper, white paper, aluminium foil, mirror, and water).

Heat Absorption
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)
Subtractive Colors

OP8.1.g: Describe applications of the laws of reflection in everyday life (e.g., sun dogs, rear view mirror, magicianâ??s tricks, and the ability to see the Moon and other non-luminous bodies).

Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

OP8.1.h: Describe qualitatively how visible light is refracted when passing from one substance to a substance of a different refractive index.

Basic Prism
Refraction

OP8.1.i: Predict how light will refract when passing into transparent media with different refractive indices (e.g., water, salt water, plastic, glass, and oil) and conduct an experiment to confirm or refute that prediction.

Basic Prism
Refraction

OP8.1.j: State a conclusion that explains how evidence gathered supports or refutes a prediction related to the refraction of light through media with different refractive indices.

Basic Prism
Refraction

OP8.2: Explore properties and applications of optics-related technologies, including concave and convex mirrors and lenses.

OP8.2.b: Investigate to determine how light interacts with concave and convex mirrors and lenses, including the formation of real and virtual images.

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

OP8.2.c: Predict and verify the effects of changes in lens position on the size and location of images produced by a convex lens and/or mirror.

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

OP8.2.d: Receive, understand, and act on the ideas of others when trying other lenses or mirror combinations to obtain various light patterns.

Laser Reflection
Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

OP8.3: Compare the nature and properties of human vision with optical devices and vision in other living organisms.

OP8.3.a: Identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues related to human vision (e.g., â??How are contact lenses crafted?â??, â??Do humans see colour the same way?â??, and â??What are some problems associated with human vision?â??).

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

OP8.3.f: Explain how colours are produced, using both the additive and subtractive models of colour, and identify applications of the additive and subtractive models of colour in daily life, including the use of traditional dyes.

Subtractive Colors

OP8.3.g: Describe the operation of optical technologies that enhance human vision (e.g., contact lenses, glasses, night vision scopes, and snow goggles).

Ray Tracing (Lenses)
Ray Tracing (Mirrors)

OP8.4: Evaluate the impact of electromagnetic radiation-based technologies on self and community.

OP8.4.a: Describe the characteristics (i.e., wavelength, frequency, energy transferred, and typical sources) of different types of electromagnetic radiation, including infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, microwaves, and radio waves.

Herschel Experiment - Metric
Radiation
Ripple Tank

OP8.4.b: Compare properties of visible light (e.g., relative energy, frequency, wavelength, and human perception) to the properties of other types of electromagnetic radiation, including infrared, ultraviolet, X-rays, microwaves, and radio waves.

Herschel Experiment - Metric
Radiation

OP8.4.d: Analyze the design and function of a technology that incorporates electromagnetic radiation (e.g., microwave oven, solar cooker, sun tanning lamp, infrared heat lamp, radio, medical imaging X-ray, blacklight, UV fire detector, night vision goggles, infrared thermography, and radar) on the basis of student-identified criteria such as cost, usefulness, and impact on self, society, and the environment.

Radiation

FD8: Forces, Fluids, and Density

FD8.1: Investigate and represent the density of solids, liquids, and gases based on the particle theory of matter.

FD8.1.b: Design and carry out processes, including the water displacement method, to determine the density of various regularly shaped and irregularly shaped materials.

Determining Density via Water Displacement

FD8.1.c: Use instruments safely, effectively, and accurately for collecting data about the density of solids, liquids, and gases.

Density Laboratory

FD8.1.e: Value accuracy, precision, and honesty when gathering data about the density of objects.

Density Laboratory

FD8.1.g: Calculate the density of various regularly shaped materials using the formula d=m/v and using units of g/mL or g/cm³.

Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
Density Laboratory

FD8.1.h: Compare the densities of common substances to the density of water and discuss practical applications that are based on differing densities.

Density Laboratory

FD8.2: Examine the effects of forces in and on objects in fluids, including the buoyant force.

FD8.2.a: Identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues involving floating, sinking, and buoyancy (e.g., â??What factors affect the amount of cargo a barge can hold?â??, â??Why do some objects float and some objects sink?â??, and â??How can a ship made of steel float in the ocean?â??).

Archimedes' Principle

FD8.2.b: Examine contributions of people from various cultures to understanding the principles of buoyancy, including Archimedes Principle, and the development of watercraft such as canoes and kayaks.

Archimedes' Principle
Determining Density via Water Displacement

FD8.2.c: Explain the concept of force and provide examples of different types of contact and non-contact forces.

Free Fall Tower
Free-Fall Laboratory

FD8.2.g: Conduct a fair test to identify which factors determine whether a given object will float or sink, and discuss reasons why scientists control some variables when conducting a fair test.

Archimedes' Principle
Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Growing Plants
Pendulum Clock

FD8.2.j: Compare different fluids to determine how they alter the buoyant force on a given object.

Archimedes' Principle
Density Laboratory
Density via Comparison

FD8.3: Investigate and describe physical properties of fluids (liquids and gases), including viscosity and compressibility.

FD8.3.b: Use appropriate vocabulary related to the study of fluids, including fluid, viscosity, buoyancy, pressure, compressibility, hydraulic, pneumatic, and density.

Archimedes' Principle
Density Laboratory
Density via Comparison
Determining Density via Water Displacement

FD8.3.i: Use the particle theory of matter to explain the differences in compressibility between liquids and gases.

Temperature and Particle Motion

FD8.4: Identify and interpret the scientific principles underlying the functioning of natural and constructed fluid systems.

FD8.4.b: Compare natural (e.g., circulatory and respiratory system) and constructed (e.g., hydraulic and air brakes, oil and gas pipelines, swimming pool circulation system, bicycle and other pumps, Archimedes screw, and automobile lifts) hydraulic and pneumatic fluid systems and identify advantages and disadvantages of each, using student-identified criteria such as cost and impact on society and the environment.

Circulatory System

WS8: Water Systems on Earth

WS8.1: Analyze the impact of natural and human-induced changes to the characteristics and distribution of water in local, regional, and national ecosystems.

WS8.1.a: Construct visual representations of the world distribution of water, and the distribution of water in Saskatchewan, including watersheds, lakes, rivers, streams, river systems, wetlands, ground water, saline lakes, and riparian areas.

Ocean Mapping

WS8.1.d: Apply the concept of systems as a tool for interpreting the structure and interactions of water systems by constructing representations of systems such as the water cycle, watersheds, and continental drainage basins and showing interrelationships between parts of the system.

Water Cycle

WS8.1.e: Construct a written, visual, or dramatic representation of the water cycle, including showing or explaining how a single particle of water can travel through the cycle over extended periods of time.

Water Cycle

WS8.2: Examine how wind, water, and ice have shaped and continue to shape the Canadian landscape.

WS8.2.a: Explain how the processes of weathering, erosion, and deposition result from water movement and wave action, including how waves and tides are generated and how they interact with shorelines.

Tides - Metric

WS8.2.f: Create a written, visual, physical, or dramatic representation of the processes that lead to the development of rivers, lakes, continental drainage systems, and ocean basins, including glaciation, continental drift, erosion, and volcanic action.

Building Pangaea
Plate Tectonics

WS8.3: Analyze natural factors and human practices that affect productivity and species distribution in marine and fresh water environments.

WS8.3.b: Identify diverse examples of organisms in a variety of marine and freshwater ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, lakes, rivers, salt marsh, estuary, ocean, and intertidal zone) and explain how biodiversity is an indicator of ecosystem health.

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

WS8.3.c: Identify factors that affect productivity and species distribution in aquatic environments (e.g., temperature, turbidity, sunlight, nutrients, salinity, water depth, currents, overfishing, upwelling, and pollutants).

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
Pond Ecosystem

WS8.3.d: Research a student-selected aquatic species, describe the characteristics of its environment, identify factors that could affect its productivity, and suggest methods of ensuring long-term viability of the species.

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

WS8.3.e: Measure factors that provide indicators of water quality, such as temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen content, presence of nitrates or phosphates, and macroinvertebrates, from a variety of samples of water.

Pond Ecosystem

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.