A: Investigating Properties of Matter (Nature of Science Emphasis)

A.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

A.1.1: Classify various forms of matter, including commonly used household substances, on the basis of their properties, and relate these properties to their safe use, storage and disposal

A.1.1.F: apply the particle model of matter to explain the physical properties of the phases of matter

Phase Changes

A.1.2: Describe solutions and solubility, solutes and solvents; and then describe how these concepts are applied to the production of prepared foods and other useful materials

A.1.2.B: define, operationally, solute, solvent, solution and solubility; and express concentration in terms of mass per volume

Solubility and Temperature

A.1.2.C: provide examples of the effect of temperature change on solubility, and explain this effect on the basis of the particle model of matter (e.g., concentration of brines for pickling and syrups for canning)

Solubility and Temperature

A.1.2.F: identify acid and base solutions in the home, job site and laboratory (e.g., vinegar, soda pop, shampoo, battery acid, household ammonia, antacids, dish soap, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide) on the basis of their general properties; i.e., they conduct electricity, change colour of acid/base indicators and neutralize one another

pH Analysis
pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

A.1.2.G: describe, in general terms, the pH scale as an indicator of acidity or basicity; i.e., a pH of less than 7 indicates an acid, a pH of 7 indicates a neutral solution, and a pH of greater than 7 indicates a base

pH Analysis
pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

A.1.3: Describe the properties of elements and compounds, and use the periodic table to identify trends in properties

A.1.3.B: use the periodic table to locate names and properties of elements

Electron Configuration

A.1.3.C: name and write chemical formulas for common elements (e.g., aluminum, copper, iron, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen) and simple compounds (e.g., water, glucose, table salt, carbon dioxide, iron oxide, vinegar, methane, propane), and describe the uses of elements and compounds in society

Chemical Equations

A.1.3.D: demonstrate the difference between elements and compounds on the basis of a decomposition reaction (e.g., electrolysis of water)

Balancing Chemical Equations
Chemical Equations

A.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on scientific inquiry)

A.2.1: Initiating and Planning

A.2.1.A: Ask questions about relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

A.2.1.A.1: define questions and problems to facilitate investigation (e.g., ask how a mixture of salt and water could be separated into its components)

Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A.2.1.A.3: formulate operational definitions of major variables and other aspects of their investigations (e.g., identify selected solutions and pure substances on the basis of their properties)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock

A.2.1.A.4: design an experiment, and identify major variables (e.g., investigate and classify elements as metals or nonmetals; test various detergents for effectiveness; identify factors that cause corrosion in iron)

Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

A.2.2: Performing and Recording

A.2.2.A: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

A.2.2.A.1: carry out procedures, controlling the major variables (e.g., investigate properties, such as physical appearance, density, conductivity, solubility, magnetism and melting point, of sample materials in the laboratory and in a reference source, and tabulate the results)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

A.2.2.A.2: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or experiment (e.g., prepare a chart that describes the properties of common household solutions and lists procedures for their safe use, storage and disposal)

Diffusion
Seed Germination

A.2.3: Analyzing and Interpreting

A.2.3.A: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

A.2.3.A.3: interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer and explain relationships among the variables (e.g., use data collected by computer in the laboratory or by other means to demonstrate that the solubility of substances varies with the nature of the solute and the solvent)

Pendulum Clock

A.2.3.A.6: identify and evaluate potential applications of findings (e.g., relate the use of standard laboratory separation techniques to the processes used in water treatment and purification; investigate how soaps and detergents can dissolve in both water and oil)

Pendulum Clock

A.2.4: Communication and Teamwork

A.2.4.A: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

A.2.4.A.2: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., write a paragraph to describe how chemicals are used at home and in industry)

Identifying Nutrients
Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

A.3: Attitude Outcomes

A.3.5: Stewardship

A.3.5.A: Demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and a sustainable environment (e.g., assume part of the collective responsibility for the impact of humans on the environment; consider the impact of technologies, weighing scientific, technological and ecological factors; evaluate the long-term impact of waste disposal, such as paints and cleaning solutions, on the environment and the quality of life of living organisms)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

B: Understanding Energy Transfer Technologies (Science and Technology Emphasis)

B.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

B.1.1: Describe how natural and technological cooling and heating systems are based upon the transfer of thermal energy (heat) from hot to cold objects

B.1.1.B: describe the three ways; i.e., radiation, conduction and convection, that thermal energy is transferred from hot to cold objects

Herschel Experiment - Metric

B.1.1.C: describe the particle model of matter in which every object consists of particles in motion, and describe the effect of temperature on this motion (e.g., observe Brownian motion)

Temperature and Particle Motion

B.1.2: Explain the functioning of common methods and devices designed to control the transfer of thermal energy

B.1.2.C: describe the variation in absorption/loss of heat (specific heat capacity) of a substance being heated or cooled, by manipulating variables that include the amount and type of material (e.g., motor oil, cooking oil, water)

Calorimetry Lab
Energy Conversion in a System

B.1.3: Describe and compare simple machines as devices that transfer energy and multiply forces or distances

B.1.3.A: analyze and describe simple machines as devices that transfer energy (e.g., screws, ramps, hammers, hockey sticks, tennis rackets)

Inclined Plane - Simple Machine
Pulley Lab

B.1.3.B: identify the joule and the newton metre as the units of energy and work in the International System of Units (SI)

Pulley Lab

B.1.3.C: analyze and describe simple machines as either force multipliers or distance multipliers

Pulley Lab

B.1.3.D: describe all simple machines as having an input force, an output force and a fulcrum (e.g., pulleys, doorknobs, winches)

Pulley Lab

B.1.3.E: develop the relationship Fd, by measuring the force (F) applied to the object and the distance (d) the object is moved in the direction in which the force is applied (e.g., use a balance beam [teeter-totter] to establish equilibrium, placing differing masses at various distances)

Free-Fall Laboratory

B.1.3.F: explain the functioning of common household machines, in terms of force multipliers and ways in which work is made easier (e.g., can openers, crowbars, car jacks, scissors and hedge clippers)

Pulley Lab

B.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on problem solving)

B.2.1: Initiating and Planning

B.2.1.A: Ask questions about relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

B.2.1.A.1: rephrase questions in a testable form, and clearly define practical problems (e.g., "How is the human body analogous to a machine?")

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

B.2.1.A.2: identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., investigate the functioning of common machines, such as car jacks, can and bottle openers, meat grinders, bicycles, ramps and others, that either change the direction, speed or magnitude of a force)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

B.2.1.A.5: design an experiment, and identify major variables (e.g., design an experiment to compare temperature changes in different liquids as they are heated, identifying variables and controls; write a procedure, design the observation tables or charts, and identify possible sources of error and their effects on the results)

Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

B.2.2: Performing and Recording

B.2.2.A: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

B.2.2.A.2: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data (e.g., collect data on daily household energy consumption by recording electricity and gas meter readings over a two-week period; organize, display and analyze the data)

Triple Beam Balance

B.2.3: Analyzing and Interpreting

B.2.3.A: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

B.2.3.A.1: interpret patterns and trends in data, and infer and explain relationships among the variables (e.g., suggest the reasons for daily fluctuations in domestic energy consumption)

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

B.2.3.A.3: identify and evaluate potential applications of findings (e.g., perform an experiment to investigate how well various materials insulate; graph temperature changes; rank commonly available insulating materials from the most to the least effective, for constructing a heatretaining device)

Pendulum Clock

B.2.3.A.4: test the design of a constructed device or system (e.g., construct a model wall, roof, floor or window to test the effectiveness of several methods of insulating homes; evaluate insulating materials, such as brick, stone, straw, wood or paper)

Trebuchet

B.2.3.A.6: evaluate designs and prototypes in terms of function, reliability, safety, efficiency, use of materials and impact on the environment (e.g., test insulating materials and methods; determine the efficiency of a machine)

Trebuchet

B.2.4: Communication and Teamwork

B.2.4.A: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

B.2.4.A.2: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., draw diagrams that show the differences between particles in solids, liquids and gases; communicate using the terms thermal energy, temperature and specific heat capacity; observe and accurately record the movement of dye in a convection tank)

Identifying Nutrients
Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

B.3: Attitude Outcomes

B.3.5: Stewardship

B.3.5.A: Demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and a sustainable environment (e.g., promote actions and technologies that are not injurious to the environment; consider the impact of technology, weighing scientific, technological and ecological factors)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

C: Investigating Matter and Energy in Living Systems (Science and Technology Emphasis)

C.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

C.1.1: Describe, in general terms, the exchange of matter by the digestive and circulatory systems, the functional relationship between the two systems and the need for a healthy diet and lifestyle

C.1.1.D: describe, in general terms, the intake of matter and its processing by the digestive system (e.g., foods are broken down into molecules that are absorbed into the blood stream from the intestine; food intake leads to increased blood sugar and mineral levels)

Digestive System

C.1.1.E: describe, in general terms, the role of the heart and lungs in the circulatory system and in the exchange and distribution of matter processed by the digestive system

Circulatory System
Digestive System

C.1.1.F: analyze the functional relationship between the digestive and circulatory systems, recognizing the work of early physicians (e.g., William Harvey, Ivan Pavlov, William Beaumont)

Circulatory System
Digestive System

C.1.2: Describe disorders of the digestive and circulatory systems as imbalances induced by genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors

C.1.2.A: describe, in general terms, how the digestive and circulatory systems interact to assist in the maintenance of balance (homeostasis) in the human organism

Circulatory System

C.1.3: Describe, in general terms, the structure and function of plant and animal cell parts; and trace the development of the cell theory

C.1.3.B: describe the structure of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall

Cell Energy Cycle
Paramecium Homeostasis
RNA and Protein Synthesis

C.1.3.C: describe, using analogies where appropriate, the functions of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall (e.g., compare cell functions to the functioning of a city)

Cell Energy Cycle
Paramecium Homeostasis
RNA and Protein Synthesis

C.1.4: Identify and compare, in general terms, the life functions common to living systems, from cells to organ systems

C.1.4.A: describe the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of biological energy storage; i.e., capture of energy from the Sun in glucose during photosynthesis, and the release of energy from glucose during respiration

Cell Energy Cycle
Photosynthesis

C.1.4.C: identify organs and systems in plants and animals that carry out the above life functions

Circulatory System
Digestive System

C.1.4.D: identify the major human organ systems that perform critical life functions; i.e., energy conversion, response to the environment, growth, reproduction, and conservation or dissipation of thermal energy

Circulatory System
Human Homeostasis

C.1.4.F: identify and describe the role of modern technology in monitoring critical life functions in humans (e.g., ultrasound, heart monitor, blood pressure cuff, blood glucose monitoring devices)

Human Karyotyping

C.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on problem solving)

C.2.1: Initiating and Planning

C.2.1.A: Ask questions about relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

C.2.1.A.1: rephrase questions in a testable form, and clearly define practical problems (e.g., "Is there a relationship between social attitudes and diet?", "What design features would a device have in order to listen to a heart beat?")

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

C.2.1.A.2: identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., plan and conduct a search, using a wide variety of electronic sources, when investigating technology used to monitor critical life functions)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

C.2.2: Performing and Recording

C.2.2.A: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

C.2.2.A.1: carry out procedures, controlling the major variables (e.g., perform experiments that demonstrate diffusion rate, and communicate this information graphically; identify the manipulated, responding and controlled variables for an experimental investigation of the effect of exercise on heart rate)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

C.2.2.A.3: use instruments effectively and accurately for collecting data (e.g., prepare wet mounts of tissue, and observe cellular structures specific to plant cells and animal cells; observe structures using photomicrographs or electron micrographs)

Triple Beam Balance

C.2.2.A.4: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or experiment (e.g., determine the nutrient components in popular diets)

Diffusion
Seed Germination

C.2.3: Analyzing and Interpreting

C.2.3.A: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

C.2.3.A.1: state a conclusion, based on experimental data, and explain how evidence gathered supports or refutes an initial idea (e.g., observe cytoplasmic streaming in the paramecium, and compare this method of matter distribution to that in multicellular living systems, such as the human organism; observe the feeding behaviour of paramecium, and compare this to the processes that occur in the human organism)

Pendulum Clock

C.2.3.A.2: critique the design of a constructed device or system (e.g., model of cell, stethoscope)

Trebuchet

C.2.3.A.4: evaluate designs and prototypes in terms of function, reliability, safety, efficiency, use of materials and impact on the environment (e.g., a device built to monitor life functions)

Trebuchet

C.2.4: Communication and Teamwork

C.2.4.A: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

C.2.4.A.2: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., research and identify the cause and physiological basis of a specific disorder in one of the systems studied; present this information orally to peers or in a document, using style sheets and with attention to page layout that incorporates advanced word processing techniques, including headers, footers, margins, columns, bibliography, index, table of contents)

Identifying Nutrients
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

C.3: Attitude Outcomes

C.3.5: Stewardship

C.3.5.A: Demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and a sustainable environment (e.g., consider all perspectives when addressing issues, weighing scientific, technological and ecological factors)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D: Investigating Matter and Energy in the Environment (Social and Environmental Emphasis)

D.1: Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Knowledge

D.1.1: Describe how the flow of matter in the biosphere is cyclical along characteristic pathways and can be disrupted by human activity

D.1.1.A: explain the role of living systems in the cycling of matter in the biosphere (e.g., food chains)

Cell Energy Cycle
Food Chain

D.1.1.D: describe, in general terms, how water, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen are cycled through the biosphere

Carbon Cycle
Cell Energy Cycle

D.1.1.E: explain why the flow of energy through the biosphere is linear and noncyclical

Food Chain

D.1.2: Analyze a local ecosystem in terms of its biotic and abiotic components, and describe factors of the equilibrium

D.1.2.B: define ecosystems in terms of biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., common plants and animals, latitude, altitude, topography)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D.1.2.C: describe how various abiotic factors influence biodiversity in an ecosystem (e.g., climate, substrate, temperature, elevation)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D.1.2.D: explain how biotic relationships can be explained in terms of the movement of matter and energy, using food chains, food webs and energy pyramids

Cell Energy Cycle
Food Chain
Forest Ecosystem

D.1.2.E: explain how various factors influence the size of populations; i.e., immigration and emigration, birth and death rates, food supply, predation, disease, reproductive rate, number of offspring produced, and climate change

Food Chain

D.1.2.F: describe how interactions among organisms limit populations (e.g., predation, parasitism, competition)

Food Chain

D.1.2.H: describe the relationship between land use practices and altering ecosystems (e.g., swamp drainage, slash and burn forestry, agriculture)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

D.2: Skill Outcomes (focus on the use of research and inquiry skills to inform the decision-making process)

D.2.1: Initiating and Planning

D.2.1.A: Ask questions about relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

D.2.1.A.1: identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues (e.g., develop questions related to recycling, ozone depletion or introduction of exotic species)

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

D.2.1.A.2: define questions and problems to facilitate investigation (e.g., develop questions to guide investigations on composting, recycling, impact of farming practices on local ecosystems)

Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

D.2.1.A.3: design an experiment; and identify the manipulated, responding and controlled variables (e.g., investigate the amount of waste materials produced by a school or family on a daily or weekly basis)

Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

D.2.1.A.4: select appropriate methods and tools for collecting data and information to solve problems (e.g., plan and conduct a search for environmental projects, using a wide variety of electronic sources)

Triple Beam Balance

D.2.2: Performing and Recording

D.2.2.A: Conduct investigations into the relationships between and among observations, and gather and record qualitative and quantitative data

D.2.2.A.1: carry out procedures, controlling the major variables (e.g., perform quantitative experiments to demonstrate that cellular respiration releases some thermal energy)

Diffusion
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram

D.2.2.A.3: organize data, using a format that is appropriate to the task or experiment (e.g., analyze the biotic and abiotic data collected in an ecosystem study, and present this information in a written or graphic format or in an oral presentation to peers)

Diffusion
Seed Germination

D.2.3: Analyzing and Interpreting

D.2.3.A: Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and assess possible explanations

D.2.3.A.1: compile and display data, by hand or computer, in a variety of formats, including diagrams, flow charts, tables, bar graphs, line graphs and scatterplots (e.g., analyze population growth curve graphs; communicate information on the flow of energy through the biosphere, using a diagram or flow chart)

Identifying Nutrients

D.2.3.A.5: identify and evaluate potential applications of findings (e.g., experimentally determine the biodegradability of various forms of organic matter, and relate findings to composting and recycling)

Pendulum Clock

D.2.4: Communication and Teamwork

D.2.4.A: Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures and results

D.2.4.A.2: communicate questions, ideas, intentions, plans and results, using lists, notes in point form, sentences, data tables, graphs, drawings, oral language and other means (e.g., represent the movement of matter and energy in an ecosystem, using food chains, webs or pyramids, and communicate this information in the form of a graphic illustration; describe the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen or oxygen, and communicate this information in clearly labelled charts, models or diagrams)

Identifying Nutrients

D.2.4.A.4: evaluate individual and group processes used in planning, problem solving, decision making and completing a task (e.g., evaluate group brainstorming ideas for environmental projects)

Pendulum Clock

D.3: Attitude Outcomes

D.3.5: Stewardship

D.3.5.A: Demonstrate sensitivity and responsibility in pursuing a balance between the needs of humans and a sustainable environment (e.g., examine their personal role in the preservation of the environment; make personal decisions based on feelings of responsibility toward less privileged parts of the global community and toward future generations; participate in the social and political systems that influence environmental policy in their community)

Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

Correlation last revised: 9/24/2019

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this province's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.