1: Science is a human endeavor involving knowledge learned through inquiring about the natural world. Scientific claims are evaluated and knowledge changes as a result of using the abilities and understandings of inquiry. The pursuit of scientific knowledge is a continuous process involving diverse people throughout history. The practice of science and the development of technology are critical pursuits of our society.

1.1: Scientific inquiry involves asking scientifically-oriented questions, collecting evidence, forming explanations, connecting explanations to scientific knowledge and theory, and communicating and justifying the explanation.

1.1.1: Frame and refine questions that can be investigated scientifically, and generate testable hypotheses.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

1.1.2: Design and conduct investigations with controlled variables to test hypotheses.

 Diffusion
 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram
 Time Estimation

1.1.3: Accurately collect data through the selection and use of tools and techniques appropriate to the investigation. Construct tables, diagrams and graphs, showing relationships between two variables, to display and facilitate analysis of data. Compare and question results with and from other students.

 Diffusion
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Measuring Volume
 Pendulum Clock

1.1.4: Form explanations based on accurate and logical analysis of evidence. Revise the explanation using alternative descriptions, predictions, models and knowledge from other sources as well as results of further investigation.

 Diffusion
 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock

1.1.5: Communicate scientific procedures, data, and explanations to enable the replication of results. Use computer technology to assist in communicating these results. Critical review is important in the analysis of these results.

 Diffusion
 Disease Spread
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Electromagnetic Induction
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume

1.1.6: Use mathematics, reading, writing, and technology in conducting scientific inquiries.

 Diffusion
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram
 Time Estimation

1.1.7: Conduct simple investigations in which a variety of materials (sand, water, light colored materials, dark colored materials) are exposed to light and heat energy. Measure the change in temperature of the material and describe any changes that occur in terms of the physical properties of the material.

 Heat Absorption

1.1.9: Design and carry out investigations to determine how changing the mass of an object or changing its speed changes its kinetic energy.

 Air Track
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics
 Sled Wars

1.1.10: Explain that gravitational potential energy (GPE) is the energy of position (above the Earth's surface) and that it depends on the object's mass and height above the ground. Relate that lifted objects have GPE and that the size of an object's GPE depends on its mass and the vertical distance it was lifted. Make a graph to demonstrate and describe how the GPE changes as the height of an object is increased or decreased.

 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Potential Energy on Shelves
 Roller Coaster Physics

1.1.11: Explain that the mechanical energy of an object is the sum of its kinetic energy and its potential energy at any point in time. Identify the mechanical energy of objects in different circumstances and identify whether the mechanical energy consists of KE, PE or both (i.e., a ball at rest at the top of an incline and in its motion part of the way down the incline or a model plane driven by a 'rubber band' motor, etc.).

 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics
 Sled Wars

1.1.12: Interpret graphical representations of energy to describe how changes in the potential energy of an object can influence changes in its kinetic energy.

 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

1.1.15: Use the properties of sound waves and the Particle Model to describe how the pitch of two waves can be different and how the loudness of two waves can be different.

 Longitudinal Waves
 Sound Beats and Sine Waves

1.1.16: Explain that heat energy and sound energy both make the particles of a substance move. Use models to explain how the particles respond differently to these types of energy. Use models to explain why sound travels much faster through substances than heat energy does.

 Longitudinal Waves

1.1.17: Explain that the electromagnetic waves from the sun consist of a range of wavelengths and associated energies. Explain that the majority of the energy from the sun reaches Earth in the form of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet waves. Use diagrams to demonstrate the differences in different types of electromagnetic waves.

 Herschel Experiment
 Radiation

1.1.18: Plan and conduct an experiment to identify the presence of UV and IR waves in sunlight or other sources of electromagnetic waves. Use evidence to explain the presence of each.

 Radiation

1.1.19: Explain that the transfer of energy from one object to another is caused by the exertion of a force. Create an energy chain to show how forces can change the mechanical energy of an object. Describe how the distance over which the forces act will influence the amount of energy transferred (and when appropriate, the amount of energy transformed).

 Air Track

1.1.20: Give examples of how mechanical energy can be transferred to (or away from) an object and describe the changes that can take place in the motion of the object because of this energy transfer, (e.g., pulling on a trailer to start it moving or using friction to slow an object and bring it to rest).

 2D Collisions
 Air Track
 Sled Wars

1.1.26: Explain how the addition or removal of heat energy can change an object's temperature or its physical state. Conduct simple investigations involving changes of physical state and temperature. Relate that there is no change in temperature when a substance is changing state.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Phase Changes

1.1.27: Explain that energy transformation and energy transfer are different processes and that energy transformations can take place during an energy transfer. Give examples of energy transformations that take place during an energy transfer. Give examples of energy transfers that do not include energy transformations. Give examples of energy transformations that take place without any energy transfer.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

1.1.28: Use energy chains to trace the flow of energy through physical systems. Indicate the energy transfers and the energy transformations that are involved in the processes (for example, the lighting of an electric lamp in a region serviced by a hydroelectric (or coal fueled) electric power plant, or the sediment that clouds a stream after a heavy rainfall).

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

1.1.29: Trace the flow of the energy carried by the light when the light strikes a material and is reflected from, transmitted through, and/or absorbed by the material. Describe the energy transfers and transformations that take place when light energy is absorbed by a material.

 Heat Absorption

1.1.30: Conduct investigations to show that materials can absorb some frequencies of electromagnetic waves, but reflect others or allow them to transmit through the material.

 Color Absorption
 Heat Absorption

1.1.31: Use this selective absorption process to explain how objects obtain their color, how materials like sunscreen can serve to protect us from harmful electromagnetic waves and how selective absorption contributes to the Greenhouse Effect.

 Color Absorption
 Greenhouse Effect
 Heat Absorption
 Subtractive Colors

1.1.32: Trace what happens to the energy from the Sun when it reaches Earth and encounters various materials, such as, atmosphere, oceans, soil, rocks, plants, and animals. Recognize that these materials absorb, reflect and transmit the electromagnetic waves coming from the sun differently.

 Heat Absorption

1.1.34: Use the properties of water and soil to explain how uneven heating of Earth's surface can occur. Conduct an investigation that shows how water and soil are heated unequally by sunlight.

 Heat Absorption

1.1.36: Use models to describe how the relative positions of the Sun, Moon, and Earth account for Moon phases, eclipses, and tides.

 2D Eclipse
 3D Eclipse
 Tides

1.1.37: Describe how the relative positions of the Earth, Moon and Sun can cause high and low tides, and unusually high or low tides.

 Tides

1.1.38: Demonstrate an understanding of the components of our Solar System and their characteristics, including the Moon, the Sun, the planets and their moons, extra-solar planets, and smaller objects such as asteroids and comets. Construct scale models of the Solar System in order to describe the relative sizes of planets and their distances from the Sun.

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Solar System Explorer

1.1.39: Demonstrate an understanding of the motion of the bodies in our Solar System. Use models, charts, illustrations, and other suitable representations to predict and describe regular patterns of motion for most objects in the Solar System.

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Solar System Explorer

1.1.40: Explain how the Sun is the central and largest body in our Solar System and the source of the light energy that hits our planet. Use models to explain how variations in the amount of Sun's energy hitting the Earth's surface results in seasons.

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons in 3D
 Seasons: Why do we have them?

1.1.41: Observe, measure, and predict changes in weather using atmospheric properties (wind speed and direction, cloud cover and type, temperature, dew point, air pressure, and relative humidity). Describe how air pressure and temperature change with increasing altitude and/or latitude.

 Relative Humidity

1.1.42: Explain how uneven heating of Earth's components - water, land, air - produce local and global atmospheric and oceanic movement. Describe how these local and global patterns of movement influence weather and climate.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

1.1.44: Use a variety of models, charts, diagrams, or simple investigations to explain how the Sun's energy drives the cycling of water through the Earth's crust, oceans, and atmosphere.

 Water Cycle

1.1.47: Describe how the interaction of air masses produces different fronts (warm, cold, and stationary) that influence our weather.

 Weather Maps

1.1.49: Use cloud characteristics (altitude, composition, and form) to predict the weather. Discuss how different cloud types are indicators of weather and weather systems such as frontal systems and hurricanes.

 Weather Maps

1.1.50: Research and report on reproductive strategies of different organisms (i.e., broadcast spawning versus nurturing parenting) that allow them to be successful.

 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

1.1.51: Observe a variety of organisms and explain how a specific trait could increase an organism's chances of survival.

 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

1.1.55: Examine an assortment of plants and animals and use simple classification keys, based on observable features, to sort and group the organisms.

 Dichotomous Keys

1.1.56: Identify a variety of reasons for extinction of a species. Use research on a variety of extinct organisms to speculate causes of extinction (i.e., inability to adapt to environmental changes).

 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

1.1.57: Survey the diversity of organisms in a local or model ecosystem. Recognizing that a population consists of all individuals of a species that occur together at a given place and time, describe how to estimate and then calculate the size of a large population of a variety of organisms. Chart the diversity of the organisms in the ecosystem.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.1.58: Categorize populations of organisms according to the roles (producers, consumers, and decomposers) they play in an ecosystem.

 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem
 Prairie Ecosystem

1.1.59: Describe and explain how factors (i.e., space, food, water, disease) limit the number of organisms an ecosystem can support.

 Food Chain
 Prairie Ecosystem
 Rabbit Population by Season

1.1.60: Construct a data table or line graph to show population changes of a selected species over time. Describe the population changes portrayed by the graph.

 Food Chain
 Prairie Ecosystem
 Rabbit Population by Season

1.1.64: Predict how plant communities that grow in the area may change over time and how their presence determines what kinds of animals may move into and out of the areas.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

1.1.65: Construct food webs and identify the relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers.

 Forest Ecosystem

1.1.66: Design food webs and trace the flow of matter and energy (beginning with the Sun) through the food web.

 Forest Ecosystem

1.2: The development of technology and advancement in science influence and drive each other forward.

1.2.2: Analyze data on sunrise and sunset times (in terms of length of daylight) and describe patterns. Explain the reason for the patterns by using models or computer simulations of the Earth and Sun.

 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

1.2.3: Using internet, newspaper, and actual observations of the night sky for at least two months, collect data on the Moon's appearance, and moonrise and moonset times. Analyze the data to describe the observable patterns (phases). Explain why the Moon's appearance changes in a repeating cyclical pattern.

 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases

1.2.6: Discuss the origin and identify characteristics (i.e., air circulation pattern, wind speed, temperature and dew point, and air pressure) of storm systems including hurricanes, Nor' easters, tornadoes, thunderstorms, and mid-latitude cyclones. Explain how these weather events can transfer heat. Describe the environmental, economic, and human impact of these storms.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds
 Hurricane Motion

1.2.7: Examine isobars on weather maps to describe how wind (moving air) travels from a region of high pressure to a region of low pressure. Apply this knowledge to explain the cause of wind.

 Weather Maps

1.2.8: Record and interpret daily weather measurements over an extended period of time using a variety of instruments (i.e., barometer, anemometer, sling psychrometer, rain gauge, and thermometer) in order to predict and to identify weather patterns.

 Weather Maps

1.2.9: Construct and use surface station models to represent local atmospheric data and interpret weather patterns on meteorological maps.

 Weather Maps

1.2.11: Use weather maps to describe the movement of fronts and storms and to predict their influence on local weather.

 Hurricane Motion
 Weather Maps

1.2.13: Identify ways in which invasive species can disrupt the balance of Delaware as well as other ecosystems (i.e., competition for resources including habitat and/or food). Research and report on an invasive species, indicating how this species has altered the ecosystem.

 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

2: Materials exist throughout our physical world. The structures of materials influence their physical properties, chemical reactivity and use.

2.1: The structures of materials determine their properties.

2.1.1: Conduct simple investigations in which a variety of materials (sand, water, light colored materials, dark colored materials) are exposed to light and heat energy. Measure the change in temperature of the material and describe any changes that occur in terms of the physical properties of the material.

 Heat Absorption

2.1.3: Explain why insulators may be used to slow the change of temperature of hot or cold materials.

 Conduction and Convection
 Heat Transfer by Conduction

3: The flow of energy drives processes of change in all biological, chemical, physical, and geological systems. Energy stored in a variety of sources can be transformed into other energy forms, which influence many facets of our daily lives. The forms of energy involved and the properties of the materials involved influence the nature of the energy transformations and the mechanisms by which energy is transferred. The conservation of energy is a law that can be used to analyze and build understandings of diverse physical and biological systems.

3.1: Energy takes many forms. These forms can be grouped into types of energy that are associated with the motion of mass (kinetic energy), and types of energy associated with the position of mass and with energy fields (potential energy).

3.1.1: Explain that kinetic energy is the energy an object has because of its motion and identify that kinetic energy depends upon the object's speed and mass.

 Air Track
 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics
 Sled Wars

3.1.2: Design and carry out investigations to determine how changing the mass of an object or changing its speed changes its kinetic energy.

 Air Track
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics
 Sled Wars

3.1.3: Explain that gravitational potential energy (GPE) is the energy of position (above the Earth's surface) and that it depends on the object's mass and height above the ground. Relate that lifted objects have GPE and that the size of an object's GPE depends on its mass and the vertical distance it was lifted. Make a graph to demonstrate and describe how the GPE changes as the height of an object is increased or decreased.

 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Potential Energy on Shelves
 Roller Coaster Physics

3.1.4: Explain that the mechanical energy of an object is the sum of its kinetic energy and its potential energy at any point in time. Identify the mechanical energy of objects in different circumstances and identify whether the mechanical energy consists of KE, PE or both (i.e., a ball at rest at the top of an incline and in its motion part of the way down the incline, or a model plane driven by a "rubber Band" motor, etc.).

 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics
 Sled Wars

3.1.5: Interpret graphical representations of energy to describe how changes in the potential energy of an object can influence changes in its kinetic energy.

 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

3.1.6: Explain that the mechanical energy of an object is a measure of how much the object can change the motion of other objects or materials (e.g.,, a ball (or air) having a large kinetic energy can do more damage than a ball (or air) with less kinetic energy).

 2D Collisions
 Air Track
 Sled Wars

3.1.7: Use the particle model to explain heat energy as the combined random kinetic energy of particles that make up an object and while the heat energy and temperature of an object are related, they are different quantities.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

3.1.10: Use the properties of sound waves and the particle model to describe how the pitch of two waves can be different and how the loudness of two waves can be different.

 Longitudinal Waves
 Sound Beats and Sine Waves

3.1.11: Explain that heat energy and sound energy both make the particles of a substance move. Use models to explain how the particles respond differently to these types of energy. Use models to explain why sound travels much faster through substances than heat energy does.

 Longitudinal Waves

3.1.13: Explain that the electromagnetic waves from the sun consist of a range of wavelengths and associated energies. Explain that the majority of the energy from the sun reaches Earth in the form of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet waves. Use diagrams to demonstrate the differences in different types of electromagnetic waves.

 Herschel Experiment
 Radiation

3.1.14: Plan and conduct an experiment to identify the presence of UV and IR waves in sunlight or other sources of electromagnetic waves. Use evidence to explain the presence of each.

 Radiation

3.2: Changes take place because of the transfer of energy. Energy is transferred to matter through the action of forces. Different forces are responsible for the transfer of the different forms of energy.

3.2.1: The force of gravity can act across very large distances of space. Through the force of gravity planets pull on their moons, and pull on each other. The sun pulls on all planets, moons and other celestial bodies in the solar system. Use an understanding of how forces change the motion of objects to explain how gravity is responsible for creating the orbital motion of planets and moons.

 Gravitational Force
 Gravity Pitch
 Tides

3.2.2: Explain that the transfer of energy from one object to another is caused by the exertion of a force. Create an energy chain to show how forces can change the mechanical energy of an object. Describe how the distance over which the forces act will influence the amount of energy transferred (and when appropriate, the amount of energy transformed).

 Air Track

3.2.3: Give examples of how mechanical energy can be transferred to (or away from) an object, and describe the changes that can take place in the motion of the object because of this energy transfer, (e.g., pulling on a trailer to start it moving or using friction to slow an object and bring it to rest).

 2D Collisions
 Air Track
 Sled Wars

3.2.11: Conduct simple investigations to demonstrate that heat energy is transferred from one material to another in predictable ways (from materials at higher temperatures to materials at lower temperatures), until both materials reach the same temperature.

 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

3.2.12: Explain how the addition or removal of heat energy can change an object's temperature or its physical state. Conduct simple investigations involving changes of physical state and temperature. Relate that there is no change in temperature when a substance is changing state.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Phase Changes

3.3: Energy readily transforms from one form to another, but these transformations are not always reversible. The details of these transformations depend upon the initial form of the energy and the properties of the materials involved. Energy may transfer into or out of a system and it may change forms, but the total energy cannot change.

3.3.1: Identify that energy can exist in several forms, and when it changes from one form into another the process is called energy transformation.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

3.3.2: Explain that energy transformation and energy transfer are different processes, and that energy transformations can take place during an energy transfer. Give examples of energy transformations that take place during an energy transfer.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

3.3.3: Give examples of energy transfers that do not include energy transformations. Give examples of energy transformations that take place without any energy transfer.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Heat Absorption
 Radiation

3.3.4: Use energy chains to trace the flow of energy through physical systems. Indicate the energy transfers and the energy transformations that are involved in the processes (e.g., the lighting of an electric lamp in a region serviced by a hydroelectric (or coal fueled) electric power plant, or the sediment that clouds a stream after a heavy rainfall).

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects

3.3.6: Trace the flow of the energy carried by the light when the light strikes a material and is reflected from, transmitted through, and/or absorbed by the material. Describe the energy transfers and transformations that take place when light energy is absorbed by a material.

 Heat Absorption

3.3.7: Conduct investigations to show that materials can absorb some frequencies of electromagnetic waves, but reflect others or allow them to transmit through the material. Use this selective absorption process to explain how objects obtain their color, how materials like sunscreen can serve to protect us from harmful electromagnetic waves, and how selective absorption contributes to the Greenhouse Effect.

 Color Absorption
 Greenhouse Effect
 Heat Absorption
 Herschel Experiment
 Subtractive Colors

3.3.8: Trace what happens to the energy from the Sun when it reaches Earth and encounters various materials, such as, atmosphere, oceans, soil, rocks, plants, and animals. Recognize that these materials absorb, reflect and transmit the electromagnetic waves coming from the sun differently.

 Heat Absorption

3.3.10: Use the properties of water and soil to explain how uneven heating of Earth's surface can occur. Conduct an investigation that shows how water and soil are heated unequally by sunlight. Describe how this can be used to explain unequal heating of the Earth's surface, producing atmospheric movements that influence weather.

 Heat Absorption

4: Our Solar System is a collection of gravitationally interacting bodies that include Earth and the Moon. Universal principles of gravitation allow predictions regarding the motions of objects within the Galaxy and beyond. Earth's motion, position, and posture account for a variety of cyclic events observable from Earth. While the composition of planets vary considerably, their components and the applicable laws of science are universal. The motions and interactions of objects within the Solar System are consistent with the hypothesis that it emerged from a large disk of gas and dust. Our Solar System is part of the Milky Way Galaxy, which, in turn, is one of many galaxies in the known Universe.

4.1: Observable, predictable patterns of movement in the Sun, Earth, Moon system occur because of gravitational interaction and energy from the Sun.

4.1.2: Analyze data on sunrise and sunset times (in terms of length of daylight) and describe patterns. Explain the reason for the patterns by using models or computer simulations of the Earth and Sun.

 Seasons: Earth, Moon, and Sun

4.1.3: Using internet, newspaper, and actual observations of the night sky for at least two months, collect data on the Moon's appearance, and moonrise and moonset times. Analyze the data to describe the observable patterns (phases). Explain why the Moon's appearance changes in a repeating cyclical pattern.

 Moonrise, Moonset, and Phases

4.1.4: Use models to describe how the relative positions of the Sun, Moon, and Earth account for Moon phases, eclipses, and tides.

 2D Eclipse
 3D Eclipse
 Tides

4.1.5: Describe how the relative positions of the Earth, Moon and Sun can cause high and low tides, and unusually high or low tides.

 Tides

4.2: Most objects in the Solar System orbit the Sun and have distinctive physical characteristics and orderly motion.

4.2.1: Demonstrate an understanding of the components of our Solar System and their characteristics, including the Moon, the Sun, the planets and their moons, extra-solar planets, and smaller objects such as asteroids and comets. Construct scale models of the Solar System in order to describe the relative sizes of planets and their distances from the Sun.

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Solar System Explorer

4.2.3: Demonstrate an understanding of the motion of the bodies in our Solar System. Use models, charts, illustrations, and other suitable representations to predict and describe regular patterns of motion for most objects in the Solar System.

 Comparing Earth and Venus
 Solar System Explorer

4.2.4: Explain how the Sun is the central and largest body in our Solar System and the source of the light energy that hits our planet. Use models to explain how variations in the amount of Sun's energy hitting the Earth's surface results in seasons.

 Seasons Around the World
 Seasons in 3D
 Seasons: Why do we have them?

4.2.5: Recognize that the force of gravity keeps planets in orbit around the sun and influences objects on Earth and other planets (i.e., tides, ability of humans to move and function). Differentiate between an object's mass and weight.

 Gravity Pitch
 Pendulum Clock

5: Earth's dynamic systems are made up of the solid earth (geosphere), the oceans, lakes, rivers, glaciers and ice sheets (hydrosphere), the atmosphere, and organisms (biosphere). Interactions among these spheres have resulted in ongoing changes to the system. Some of these changes can be measured on a human time scale, but others occur so slowly, that they must be inferred from geological evidence.

5.2: Earth's components form systems. These systems continually interact at different rates of time, affecting the Earth locally and globally.

5.2.1: Observe, measure, and predict changes in weather using atmospheric properties (wind speed and direction, cloud cover and type, temperature, dew point, air pressure, and relative humidity). Describe how air pressure and temperature change with increasing altitude and/or latitude.

 Relative Humidity

5.2.2: Explain how uneven heating of Earth's components - water, land, air - produce local and global atmospheric and oceanic movement. Describe how these local and global patterns of movement influence weather and climate.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds

5.2.4: Use a variety of models, charts, diagrams, or simple investigations to explain how the Sun's energy drives the cycling of water through the Earth's crust, oceans, and atmosphere.

 Water Cycle

5.2.7: Discuss the origin and identify characteristics (i.e., air circulation pattern, wind speed, temperature and dew point, and air pressure) of storm systems including hurricanes, Nor' easters, tornadoes, thunderstorms, and mid-latitude cyclones. Explain how these weather events can transfer heat. Describe the environmental, economic, and human impact of these storms.

 Coastal Winds and Clouds
 Hurricane Motion

5.2.9: Describe how origin affects the temperature and moisture content of an air mass. Describe how the interaction of air masses produces different fronts (warm, cold, and stationary) that influence our weather.

 Weather Maps

5.2.11: Use cloud characteristics (altitude, composition, and form) to predict the weather. Discuss how different cloud types are indicators of weather and weather systems such as frontal systems and hurricanes.

 Weather Maps

5.3: Technology enables us to better understand Earth's systems. It also allows us to analyze the impact of human activities on Earth's systems and the impact of Earth's systems on human activity.

5.3.1: Examine isobars on weather maps to describe how wind (moving air) travels from a region of high pressure to a region of low pressure. Apply this knowledge to explain the cause of wind.

 Weather Maps

5.3.2: Record and interpret daily weather measurements over an extended period of time using a variety of instruments (i.e., barometer, anemometer, sling psychrometer, rain gauge, and thermometer) in order to predict and to identify weather patterns.

 Weather Maps

5.3.3: Construct and use surface station models to represent local atmospheric data and interpret weather patterns on meteorological maps.

 Weather Maps

5.3.5: Use weather maps to describe the movement of fronts and storms and to predict their influence on local weather.

 Hurricane Motion
 Weather Maps

6: The natural world is defined by organisms and life processes which conform to principles regarding conservation and transformation of matter and energy. Living organisms use matter and energy to build their structures and conduct their life processes, have mechanisms and behaviors to regulate their internal environments and to respond to changes in their surroundings. Knowledge about life processes can be applied to improving human health and well being.

6.3: Organisms respond to internal and external cues, which allow them to survive.

6.3.1: Understand and describe how the maintenance of a relatively stable internal environment is required for the continuation of life and explain how stability is challenged by changing physical, chemical, and environmental conditions.

 Paramecium Homeostasis

6.3.2: Explain that the regulatory and behavioral responses of an organism to external stimuli occur in order to maintain both short and long term equilibrium (e.g., migrating shorebirds behave differently along the migration path in order to support their life cycle).

 Human Homeostasis

7: The natural world consists of a diversity of organisms that transmit their characteristics to future generations. Living things reproduce, develop, and transmit traits, and theories of evolution explain the unity and diversity of species found on Earth. Knowledge of genetics, reproduction, and development is applied to improve agriculture and human health.

7.1: Organisms reproduce, develop, have predictable life cycles, and pass on heritable traits to their offspring.

7.1.2: Research and report on reproductive strategies of different organisms (i.e., broadcast spawning versus nurturing parenting) that allow them to be successful.

 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

7.2: The diversity and changing of life forms over many generations is the result of natural selection, in which organisms with advantageous traits survive, reproduce, and pass those traits to offspring.

7.2.2: Observe a variety of organisms and explain how a specific trait could increase an organism's chances of survival.

 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

7.2.7: Examine an assortment of plants and animals and use simple classification keys, based on observable features, to sort and group the organisms.

 Dichotomous Keys

7.2.8: Identify a variety of reasons for extinction of a species. Use research on a variety of extinct organisms to speculate causes of extinction (i.e., inability to adapt to environmental changes).

 Natural Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

8: Organisms are linked to one another in an ecosystem by the flow of energy and the cycling of materials. Humans are an integral part of the natural system and human activities can alter the stability of ecosystems.

8.1: Organisms and their environments are interconnected. Changes in one part of the system will affect other parts of the system.

8.1.1: Survey the diversity of organisms in a local or model ecosystem. Recognizing that a population consists of all individuals of a species that occur together at a given place and time, describe how to estimate and then calculate the size of a large population of a variety of organisms. Chart the diversity of the organisms in the ecosystem.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors

8.1.2: Categorize populations of organisms according to the roles (producers, consumers, and decomposers) they play in an ecosystem.

 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem
 Prairie Ecosystem

8.1.3: Describe and explain how factors (i.e., space, food, water, disease) limit the number of organisms an ecosystem can support.

 Food Chain
 Prairie Ecosystem
 Rabbit Population by Season

8.1.4: Construct a data table or line graph to show population changes of a selected species over time. Describe the population changes portrayed by the graph.

 Food Chain
 Prairie Ecosystem
 Rabbit Population by Season

8.2: Matter needed to sustain life is continually recycled among and between organisms and the environment. Energy from the Sun flows irreversibly through ecosystems and is conserved as organisms use and transform it.

8.2.1: Construct food webs and identify the relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers.

 Forest Ecosystem

8.2.2: Design food webs and trace the flow of matter and energy (beginning with the Sun) through the food web.

 Forest Ecosystem

8.3: Humans can alter the living and non-living factors within an ecosystem, thereby creating changes to the overall system.

8.3.2: Identify ways in which invasive species can disrupt the balance of Delaware as well as other ecosystems (i.e., competition for resources including habitat and/or food). Research and report on an invasive species, indicating how this species has altered the ecosystem.

 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

Correlation last revised: 5/9/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.