1: Science is a human endeavor involving knowledge learned through inquiring about the natural world. Scientific claims are evaluated and knowledge changes as a result of using the abilities and understandings of inquiry. The pursuit of scientific knowledge is a continuous process involving diverse people throughout history. The practice of science and the development of technology are critical pursuits of our society.

1.1: Scientific inquiry involves asking scientifically-oriented questions, collecting evidence, forming explanations, connecting explanations to scientific knowledge and theory, and communicating and justifying the explanation.

1.1.1: Frame and refine questions that can be investigated scientifically, and generate testable hypotheses.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Sight vs. Sound Reactions

1.1.2: Design and conduct investigations with controlled variables to test hypotheses.

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram
 Time Estimation

1.1.3: Accurately collect data through the selection and use of tools and techniques appropriate to the investigation. Construct tables, diagrams and graphs, showing relationships between two variables, to display and facilitate analysis of data. Compare and question results with and from other students.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Measuring Volume
 Pendulum Clock

1.1.4: Form explanations based on accurate and logical analysis of evidence. Revise the explanation using alternative descriptions, predictions, models and knowledge from other sources as well as results of further investigation.

 Effect of Environment on New Life Form
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock

1.1.5: Communicate scientific procedures, data, and explanations to enable the replication of results. Use computer technology to assist in communicating these results. Critical review is important in the analysis of these results.

 Disease Spread
 Effect of Temperature on Gender
 Hearing: Frequency and Volume

1.1.6: Use mathematics, reading, writing, and technology in conducting scientific inquiries.

 Hearing: Frequency and Volume
 Pendulum Clock
 Real-Time Histogram
 Time Estimation

1.1.7: Recognize that all matter consists of particles and how the particles are arranged determines the physical state. Use the particle model to describe solids, liquids, and gases in terms of the packing and motion of particles.

 Element Builder
 Phases of Water
 Temperature and Particle Motion

1.1.8: Measure and record the temperature of ice water as it is heated. Plot the graph of measurements taken and interpret the change of phase graph using the particle model, identifying the states of matter.

 Phases of Water

1.1.9: Analyze a standard change of phase graph of water. Using the particle model, identify where water is a solid, liquid or gas, is freezing/melting or evaporating/condensing. Relate the states of matter to the changes (increase, decrease) of energy in the system.

 Phases of Water

1.1.10: Make a model or drawing of particles of the same material in solid, liquid, and gas state. Describe the arrangement, spacing and energy in each state.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

1.1.11: Calculate the density of various solid materials. Use density to predict whether an object will sink or float in water. Given the density of various solids and liquids, create a density column and explain the arrangement in terms of density.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory
 Density via Comparison
 Determining Density via Water Displacement

1.1.12: Use physical properties to distinguish and separate one substance or material from another.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Mineral Identification

1.1.17: Conduct investigations to demonstrate the process of diffusion. Use the particle model to describe the movement of materials from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration.

 Osmosis

1.1.19: Describe how heat energy when added to a substance, will increase its temperature or change its state. Explain that as more heat energy is added to a substance, the particles' vibrations increase and the spacing between the particles increases, but the size of the particles stays the same.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Phases of Water
 Temperature and Particle Motion

1.1.22: Use diagrams of the hydrologic cycle to show and describe the circulation of water through the Earth's crust, oceans, and atmosphere.

 Water Cycle

1.1.23: Use the particle model to describe solids, liquids, and gases in terms of the packing, motion of particles, and energy gain or loss. Apply this to the processes of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation in the water cycle. Explain how heat energy drives the water cycle.

 Temperature and Particle Motion
 Water Cycle

1.1.24: Use models or diagrams to explain how water stored underground (groundwater and aquifers) and water stored above ground (lakes, rivers, air, etc...) interact to form a continuous cycle.

 Porosity
 Water Cycle

1.1.26: Conduct investigations and use the data to describe the extent to which the permeability and porosity of a soil sample affect the rate of water percolation.

 Porosity

1.1.27: Use topographic maps to locate Delaware watersheds and to identify the bodies of water into which they drain. Analyze and describe the relationship between elevation of land and the flow rate of water in a watershed.

 Building Topographic Maps
 Reading Topographic Maps

1.1.28: Conduct tests including temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nitrate, and phosphate to determine the potability of local water samples.

 Pond Ecosystem

1.1.32: Observe and sketch cells using microscopes and other appropriate tools. Compare and contrast plant, animal, protist, and bacterial cells by noting the presence or absence of major organelles (i.e., cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, chloroplasts, mitochondria and vacuoles) using the sketches and other resources. Research external conditions needed by a variety of organisms for survival such as temperature, turbidity, pH, salinity, and amount of dissolved oxygen, phosphates, and nitrates. Predict how organisms may respond to changes in these external conditions based on research findings.

 Cell Structure
 Natural Selection
 Pond Ecosystem
 RNA and Protein Synthesis
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

1.1.33: Recognize that reproduction is a process that occurs in all living systems and is essential to the continuation of the species. Use models or diagrams to identify the structures of a flowering plant that produce eggs and sperm and explain that plants as well as animals can reproduce sexually.

 Pollination: Flower to Fruit
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

1.1.34: Given varied scenarios (including one or two parent reproduction, and having traits identical to or different than the parents), classify offspring as either sexually or asexually produced and justify your response.

 Inheritance

1.1.35: Compare and contrast asexual and sexual reproduction in terms of potential variation and adaptation to a static or changing environment. Relate advantages and/or disadvantages of each strategy.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection

1.1.37: Make a simple labeled drawing of asexual reproduction as it occurs in sexually produced organisms at the cellular level. Indicate that resulting cells contain an identical copy of genetic information from the parent cell.

 Cell Division

1.1.38: Describe the relationship between genes, chromosomes, and DNA in terms of location and relative size.

 Human Karyotyping

1.1.39: Use single trait Punnett squares to examine the genotypes of individuals and indicate which individuals will express dominant or recessive traits. Justify the indication by relating that dominant alleles appearing heterozygously or homozygously are expressed or that two recessive alleles (homozygous) are required for an offspring to express a recessive trait phenotypically.

 Chicken Genetics
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

1.1.41: Research and report on the contributions of Gregor Mendel and other genetic researchers and how their contributions altered the body of scientific knowledge.

 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)

2: Materials exist throughout our physical world. The structures of materials influence their physical properties, chemical reactivity and use.

2.1: The structures of materials determine their properties.

2.1.1: Recognize that all matter consists of particles and how the particles are arranged determines the physical state. Use the particle model to describe solids, liquids, and gases in terms of the packing and motion of particles.

 Element Builder
 Phases of Water
 Temperature and Particle Motion

2.1.2: Measure and record the temperature of ice water as it is heated. Plot the graph of measurements taken and interpret the change of phase graph using the particle model, identifying the states of matter.

 Phases of Water

2.1.3: Analyze a standard change of phase graph of water. Using the particle model, identify where water is a solid, liquid or gas, is freezing/melting or evaporating/condensing. Relate the states of matter to the changes (increase, decrease) of energy in the system.

 Phases of Water

2.1.4: Make a model or drawing of particles of the same material in solid, liquid, and gas state. Describe the arrangement, spacing and energy in each state.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

2.1.5: Distinguish between physical properties that are dependent upon mass (size, shape) and those physical properties such as boiling point, melting point, solubility, density, conduction of heat and pH of a substance or material that are not altered when the mass of the material is changed.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice

2.1.6: Calculate the density of various solid materials. Use density to predict whether an object will sink or float in water. Given the density of various solids and liquids, create a density column and explain the arrangement in terms of density.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory
 Density via Comparison
 Determining Density via Water Displacement

2.1.7: Use physical properties to distinguish and separate one substance or material from another.

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Mineral Identification

2.2: The properties of a mixture are based on the properties of its components.

2.2.5: Conduct investigations to demonstrate the process of diffusion. Use the particle model to describe the movement of materials from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration.

 Osmosis

3: The flow of energy drives processes of change in all biological, chemical, physical, and geological systems. Energy stored in a variety of sources can be transformed into other energy forms, which influence many facets of our daily lives. The forms of energy involved and the properties of the materials involved influence the nature of the energy transformations and the mechanisms by which energy is transferred. The conservation of energy is a law that can be used to analyze and build understandings of diverse physical and biological systems.

3.1: Energy takes many forms. These forms can be grouped into types of energy that are associated with the motion of mass (kinetic energy), and types of energy associated with the position of mass and with energy fields (potential energy).

3.1.1: Describe how heat energy when added to a substance, will increase its temperature or change its state. Explain that as more heat energy is added to a substance, the particles' vibrations increase and the spacing between the particles increases, but the size of the particles stays the same.

 Energy Conversion in a System
 Phases of Water
 Temperature and Particle Motion

5: Earth's dynamic systems are made up of the solid earth (geosphere), the oceans, lakes, rivers, glaciers and ice sheets (hydrosphere), the atmosphere, and organisms (biosphere). Interactions among these spheres have resulted in ongoing changes to the system. Some of these changes can be measured on a human time scale, but others occur so slowly, that they must be inferred from geological evidence.

5.2: Earth's components form systems. These systems continually interact at different rates of time, affecting the Earth locally and globally.

5.2.1: Use diagrams of the hydrologic cycle to show and describe the circulation of water through the Earth's crust, oceans, and atmosphere.

 Water Cycle

5.2.2: Use the particle model to describe solids, liquids, and gases in terms of the packing, motion of particles, and energy gain or loss. Apply this to the processes of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation in the water cycle. Explain how heat energy drives the water cycle.

 Temperature and Particle Motion
 Water Cycle

5.2.3: Use models or diagrams to explain how water stored underground (groundwater and aquifers) and water stored above ground (lakes, rivers, air, etc.) interact to form a continuous cycle.

 Porosity
 Water Cycle

5.2.5: Conduct investigations and use the data to describe the extent to which the permeability and porosity of a soil sample affect the rate of water percolation.

 Porosity

5.3: Technology enables us to better understand Earth's systems. It also allows us to analyze the impact of human activities on Earth's systems and the impact of Earth's systems on human activity.

5.3.1: Use topographic maps to locate Delaware watersheds and to identify the bodies of water into which they drain. Analyze and describe the relationship between elevation of land and the flow rate of water in a watershed.

 Building Topographic Maps
 Reading Topographic Maps

5.3.2: Conduct tests including temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nitrate, and phosphate to determine the potability of local water samples.

 Pond Ecosystem

6: The natural world is defined by organisms and life processes which conform to principles regarding conservation and transformation of matter and energy. Living organisms use matter and energy to build their structures and conduct their life processes, have mechanisms and behaviors to regulate their internal environments and to respond to changes in their surroundings. Knowledge about life processes can be applied to improving human health and well being.

6.1: Living systems, from the organismic to the cellular level, demonstrate the complementary nature of structure and function.

6.1.3: Explain that individual cells are able to carry out basic life functions that are similar in organisms; however, explain that in multi-cellular organisms, cells become specialized, interdependent upon one another, and unable to survive independently.

 Cell Structure
 Paramecium Homeostasis

6.1.4: Describe the hierarchical organization of multi-cellular organisms. Recognize that multi-celled organisms are organized as specialized cells within tissues that make up organs within organ systems, which work together to carry out life processes for the entire organism.

 Circulatory System

6.1.5: Observe and sketch cells using microscopes and other appropriate tools. Compare and contrast plant, animal, protist, and bacterial cells by noting the presence or absence of major organelles (i.e., cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, chloroplasts, mitochondria and vacuoles) using the sketches and other resources.

 Cell Structure
 RNA and Protein Synthesis

6.2: All organisms transfer matter and convert energy from one form to another. Both matter and energy are necessary to build and maintain structures within the organism.

6.2.1: Recognize that the process of photosynthesis occurs in the chloroplasts of producers. Summarize the basic process in which energy from sunlight is used to make sugars from carbon dioxide and water (photosynthesis). Indicate that this food can be used immediately, stored for later use, or used by other organisms.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Food Chain
 Forest Ecosystem
 Photosynthesis Lab

6.2.2: Recognize that the process of cellular respiration in the mitochondria of both plants and animals releases energy from food. Indicate that this food provides the energy and materials for repair and growth of cells. Explain the complementary nature between photosynthesis and cellular respiration.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Cell Structure

6.3: Organisms respond to internal and external cues, which allow them to survive.

6.3.1: Research external conditions needed by a variety of organisms for survival such as temperature, turbidity, pH, salinity, and amount of dissolved oxygen, phosphates, and nitrates. Predict how organisms may respond to changes in these external conditions based on research findings.

 Natural Selection
 Pond Ecosystem
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

7: The natural world consists of a diversity of organisms that transmit their characteristics to future generations. Living things reproduce, develop, and transmit traits, and theories of evolution explain the unity and diversity of species found on Earth. Knowledge of genetics, reproduction, and development is applied to improve agriculture and human health.

7.1: Organisms reproduce, develop, have predictable life cycles, and pass on heritable traits to their offspring.

7.1.1: Recognize that reproduction is a process that occurs in all living systems and is essential to the continuation of the species. Use models or diagrams to identify the structures of a flowering plant that produce eggs and sperm and explain that plants, as well as, animals can reproduce sexually.

 Pollination: Flower to Fruit

7.1.2: Given varied scenarios (including one or two parent reproduction, and having traits identical to or different than the parents), classify offspring as either sexually or asexually produced and justify your response.

 Inheritance

7.1.3: Compare and contrast asexual and sexual reproduction in terms of potential variation and adaptation to a static or changing environment. Relate advantages and/or disadvantages of each strategy.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection

7.1.5: Make a simple labeled drawing of asexual reproduction as it occurs in sexually produced organisms at the cellular level. Indicate that resulting cells contain an identical copy of genetic information from the parent cell.

 Cell Division

7.1.6: Describe the relationship between genes, chromosomes, and DNA in terms of location and relative size.

 Human Karyotyping

7.1.7: Explain how the sex chromosomes inherited from each parent determines the gender of the offspring.

 Human Karyotyping

7.1.8: Model a random process (e.g., coin toss) that illustrates which alleles can be passed from parent to offspring.

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

7.1.9: Use single trait Punnett squares to examine the genotypes of individuals and indicate which individuals will express dominant or recessive traits. Justify the indication by relating that dominant alleles appearing heterozygously or homozygously are expressed or that two recessive alleles (homozygous) are required for an offspring to express a recessive trait phenotypically.

 Chicken Genetics
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

7.1.11: Research and report on the contributions of Gregor Mendel and other genetic researchers and how their contributions altered the body of scientific knowledge.

 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)

7.2: The diversity and changing of life forms over many generations is the result of natural selection, in which organisms with advantageous traits survive, reproduce, and pass those traits to offspring.

7.2.1: Explain through the use of models or diagrams, why sexually-produced offspring are not identical to their parents.

 Inheritance
 Mouse Genetics (One Trait)
 Mouse Genetics (Two Traits)

Correlation last revised: 1/20/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.