2: Demonstrate an understanding of the atomic model of matter by explaining atomic structure and chemical bonding.

2.a: Describe and classify matter based on physical and chemical properties and interactions between molecules or atoms.

2.a.1: Physical properties (e.g., melting points, densities, boiling points) of a variety of substances

 Density Experiment: Slice and Dice
 Density Laboratory

2.a.3: Three states of matter in terms of internal energy, molecular motion, and the phase transitions between them

 Phase Changes

2.b: Research and explain crucial contributions and critical experiments of Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford, Bohr, de Broglie, and Schr├Ádinger and describe how each discovery contributed to the current model of atomic and nuclear structure.

 Bohr Model of Hydrogen
 Bohr Model: Introduction

2.c: Develop a model of atomic and nuclear structure based on theory and knowledge of fundamental particles.

2.c.1: Properties and interactions of the three fundamental particles of the atom

 Element Builder

2.c.2: Laws of conservation of mass, constant composition, definite proportions, and multiple proportions

 Chemical Equations

2.d: Write appropriate equations for nuclear decay reactions, describe how the nucleus changes during these reactions, and compare the resulting radiation with regard to penetrating ability.

2.d.1: Three major types of radioactive decay (e.g., alpha, beta, gamma) and the properties of the emissions (e.g., composition, mass, charge, penetrating power)

 Nuclear Decay

2.d.2: The concept of half-life for a radioactive isotope (e.g., carbon-14 dating) based on the principle that the decay of any individual atom is a random process

 Half-life

2.e: Compare the properties of compounds according to their type of bonding.

2.e.1: Covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding

 Covalent Bonds
 Ionic Bonds

2.e.3: Valence electrons and bonding atoms

 Covalent Bonds
 Electron Configuration
 Ionic Bonds

2.g: Develop a three-dimensional model of molecular structure.

2.g.1: Lewis dot structures for simple molecules and ionic compounds

 Covalent Bonds
 Ionic Bonds

3: Develop an understanding of the periodic table.

3.a: Calculate the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons in individual isotopes using atomic numbers and mass numbers, write electron configurations of elements and ions following the Aufbau principle, and balance equations representing nuclear reactions.

 Electron Configuration
 Element Builder

3.b: Analyze patterns and trends in the organization of elements in the periodic table and compare their relationship to position in the periodic table.

3.b.1: Atomic number, atomic mass, mass number, and number of protons, electrons, and neutrons in isotopes of elements

 Element Builder

3.b.3: Chemical characteristics of each region

 Electron Configuration

3.b.4: Periodic properties (e.g., metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity, electron affinity, ionization energy, atomic/covalent/ionic radius)

 Electron Configuration

3.c: Classify chemical reactions by type.

3.c.1: Single displacement, double displacement, synthesis (combination), decomposition, disproportionation, combustion, or precipitation.

 Balancing Chemical Equations
 Chemical Equations
 Dehydration Synthesis
 Equilibrium and Concentration

3.c.2: Products (given reactants) or reactants (given products) for each reaction type

 Balancing Chemical Equations
 Chemical Equations
 Equilibrium and Concentration

3.d: Use stoichiometry to calculate the amount of reactants consumed and products formed.

3.d.1: Difference between chemical reactions and chemical equations

 Chemical Equations
 Equilibrium and Concentration

3.d.2: Formulas and calculations of the molecular (molar) masses

 Chemical Equations
 Limiting Reactants
 Stoichiometry

4: Analyze the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic models of matter.

4.a: Analyze the nature and behavior of gaseous, liquid, and solid substances using the kinetic molecular theory.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

4.c: Use the gas laws of Boyles, Charles, Gay-Lussac, and Dalton to solve problems based on the laws.

 Boyle's Law and Charles' Law

4.d: Explain the thermodynamics associated with physical and chemical concepts related to temperature, entropy, enthalpy, and heat energy.

4.d.1: Specific heat as it relates to the conservation of energy

 Energy Conversion in a System

4.d.3: Energy (in calories and joules) required to change the state of a sample of a given substance, using its mass and its heat of vaporization or heat of fusion.

 Phase Changes

4.d.4: Endothermic or exothermic changes

 Chemical Changes

4.e: Describe and identify factors affecting the solution process, rates of reaction, and equilibrium.

4.e.2: Chemical reaction rates affected by temperature, concentration, surface area, pressure, mixing, and the presence of a catalyst

 Collision Theory

4.e.4: LeChatelier?s Principle

 Equilibrium and Concentration
 Equilibrium and Pressure

5: Compare factors associated with acid/base and oxidation/reduction reactions.

5.a: Analyze and explain acid/base reactions.

5.a.1: Properties of acids and bases, including how they affect indicators and the relative pH of the solution

 pH Analysis
 pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

5.a.2: Formation of acidic and basic solutions

 pH Analysis
 pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

5.a.3: Definition of pH in terms of the hydronium ion concentration and the hydroxide ion concentration

 pH Analysis
 pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

5.b: Classify species in aqueous solutions according to the Arrhenius and Bronsted-Lowry definitions, respectively and predict products for aqueous neutralization reactions.

 Titration
 pH Analysis
 pH Analysis: Quad Color Indicator

Correlation last revised: 1/20/2017

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.