SC-HS-1: Physical Science

SC-HS-1.1: Structure and Transformation of Matter

SC-HS-1.1.1: Students will classify or make generalizations about elements from data of observed patterns in atomic structure and/or position on the periodic table.

SC-HS-1.1.1.a: The periodic table is a consequence of the repeating pattern of outermost electrons.

 Electron Configuration

SC-HS-1.1.2: Students will understand that the atom?s nucleus is composed of protons and neutrons that are much more massive than electrons. When an element has atoms that differ in the number of neutrons, these atoms are called different isotopes of the element.

 Element Builder

SC-HS-1.1.3: Students will understand that solids, liquids and gases differ in the distances between molecules or atoms and therefore the energy that binds them together. In solids, the structure is nearly rigid; in liquids, molecules or atoms move around each other but do not move apart; and in gases, molecules or atoms move almost independently of each other and are relatively far apart. The behavior of gases and the relationship of the variables influencing them can be described and predicted.

 Phase Changes

SC-HS-1.1.4: Students will understand that in conducting materials, electrons flow easily; whereas, in insulating materials, they can hardly flow at all. Semiconducting materials have intermediate behavior. At low temperatures, some materials become superconductors and offer no resistance to the flow of electrons.

 Circuit Builder

SC-HS-1.1.6: Students will:

SC-HS-1.1.6.a: identify variables that affect reaction rates;

 Collision Theory

SC-HS-1.1.6.b: predict effects of changes in variables (concentration, temperature, properties of reactants, surface area and catalysts) based on evidence/data from chemical reactions.

SC-HS-1.1.6.b.1: Rates of chemical reactions vary. Reaction rates depend on concentration, temperature and properties of reactants. Catalysts speed up chemical reactions.

 Collision Theory

SC-HS-1.1.7: Students will:

SC-HS-1.1.7.a: construct diagrams to illustrate ionic or covalent bonding;

 Covalent Bonds
 Ionic Bonds

SC-HS-1.1.7.b: predict compound formation and bond type as either ionic or covalent (polar, nonpolar) and represent the products formed with simple chemical formulas.

SC-HS-1.1.7.b.1: Bonds between atoms are created when outer electrons are paired by being transferred (ionic) or shared (covalent). A compound is formed when two or more kinds of atoms bind together chemically.

 Covalent Bonds
 Ionic Bonds

SC-HS-1.2: Motion and Forces

SC-HS-1.2.1: Students will:

SC-HS-1.2.1.a: select or construct accurate and appropriate representations for motion (visual, graphical and mathematical);

 Distance-Time Graphs

SC-HS-1.2.1.b: defend conclusions/explanations about the motion of objects and real-life phenomena from evidence/data.

SC-HS-1.2.1.b.1: Objects change their motion only when a net force is applied. Newton?s Laws of motion are used to describe the effects of forces on the motion of objects. Conservation of mechanical energy and conservation of momentum may also be used to predict motion.

 2D Collisions
 Air Track
 Atwood Machine
 Energy Conversion in a System
 Energy of a Pendulum
 Fan Cart Physics
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

SC-HS-1.2.2: Students will:

SC-HS-1.2.2.a: explain the relationship between electricity and magnetism;

 Electromagnetic Induction
 Magnetic Induction

SC-HS-1.2.2.b: propose solutions to real life problems involving electromagnetism.

SC-HS-1.2.2.b.1: Electricity and magnetism are two aspects of a single electromagnetic force. Moving electric charges produce magnetic forces or ?fields? and moving magnets produce electric forces or ?fields?. This idea underlies the operation of electric motors and generators.

 Electromagnetic Induction
 Magnetic Induction

SC-HS-1.2.3: Students will understand that the electric force is a universal force that exists between any two charged objects. Opposite charges attract while like charges repel.

 Coulomb Force (Static)
 Pith Ball Lab

SC-HS-2: Earth/Space Science

SC-HS-2.3: The Earth and the Universe

SC-HS-2.3.1: Students will:

SC-HS-2.3.1.a: explain phenomena (falling objects, planetary motion, satellite motion) related to gravity;

 Free-Fall Laboratory
 Orbital Motion - Kepler's Laws

SC-HS-2.3.1.b: describe the factors that affect gravitational force.

SC-HS-2.3.1.b.1: Gravity is a universal force that each mass exerts on every other mass.

 Gravitational Force
 Pith Ball Lab

SC-HS-2.3.6: Students will:

SC-HS-2.3.6.a: compare the limitations/benefits of various techniques (radioactive dating, observing rock sequences and comparing fossils) for estimating geological time;

 Half-life

SC-HS-2.3.6.b: justify deductions about age of geologic features.

SC-HS-2.3.6.b.1: Techniques used to estimate geological time include using radioactive dating, observing rock sequences and comparing fossils to correlate the rock sequences at various locations.

 Half-life

SC-HS-2.3.8: Students will predict consequences of both rapid (volcanoes, earthquakes) and slow (mountain building, plate movement) earth processes from evidence/data and justify reasoning.

SC-HS-2.3.8.a: The Earth?s surface is dynamic; earthquakes and volcanic eruptions can be observed on a human time scale, but many processes, such as mountain building and plate movements, take place over hundreds of millions of years.

 Plate Tectonics

SC-HS-3: Biological Science

SC-HS-3.4: Unity and Diversity

SC-HS-3.4.1: Students will explain the role of DNA in protein synthesis.

SC-HS-3.4.1.a: Cells store and use information to guide their functions. The genetic information stored in DNA directs the synthesis of the thousands of proteins that each cell requires. Errors that may occur during this process may result in mutations that may be harmful to the organism.

 Paramecium Homeostasis
 RNA and Protein Synthesis

SC-HS-3.4.3: Students will:

SC-HS-3.4.3.a: describe cell regulation (enzyme function, diffusion, osmosis, homeostasis);

 Osmosis
 Paramecium Homeostasis

SC-HS-3.4.3.b: predict consequences of internal/external environmental change on cell function/regulation.

SC-HS-3.4.3.b.1: Cell functions are regulated. Regulation occurs both through changes in the activity of the functions performed by proteins and through selective expression of individual genes. This regulation allows cells to respond to their internal and external environments and to control and coordinate cell growth and division.

 Paramecium Homeostasis

SC-HS-3.4.4: Students will understand that plant cells contain chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis. Plants and many microorganisms (e.g., Euglena) use solar energy to combine molecules of carbon dioxide and water into complex, energy-rich organic compounds and release oxygen to the environment. This process of photosynthesis provides a vital link between the Sun and energy needs of living systems.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Cell Structure
 Photosynthesis Lab

SC-HS-3.4.5: Students will:

SC-HS-3.4.5.b: draw conclusions/make predictions based on hereditary evidence/data (pedigrees, punnet squares).

SC-HS-3.4.5.b.1: Multicellular organisms, including humans, form from cells that contain two copies of each chromosome. This explains many features of heredity. Transmission of genetic information through sexual reproduction to offspring occurs when male and female gametes, that contain only one representative from each chromosome pair, unite.

 Human Karyotyping

SC-HS-3.4.6: Students will understand that in all organisms and viruses, the instructions for specifying the characteristics are carried in nucleic acids. The chemical and structural properties of nucleic acids determine how the genetic information that underlies heredity is both encoded in genes and replicated.

 RNA and Protein Synthesis

SC-HS-3.4.7: Students will:

SC-HS-3.4.7.a: classify organisms into groups based on similarities;

 Dichotomous Keys
 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

SC-HS-3.4.7.b: infer relationships based on internal and external structures and chemical processes.

SC-HS-3.4.7.b.1: Biological classifications are based on how organisms are related. Organisms are classified into a hierarchy of groups and subgroups based on similarities that reflect their relationships. Species is the most fundamental unit of classification. Different species are classified by the comparison and analysis of their internal and external structures and the similarity of their chemical processes.

 Dichotomous Keys
 Human Evolution - Skull Analysis

SC-HS-3.5: Biological Change

SC-HS-3.5.1: Students will:

SC-HS-3.5.1.a: predict the impact on species of changes to 1) the potential for a species to increase its numbers, (2) the genetic variability of offspring due to mutation and recombination of genes, (3) a finite supply of the resources required for life, or (4) natural selection;

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

SC-HS-3.5.1.b: propose solutions to real-world problems of endangered and extinct species.

SC-HS-3.5.1.b.1: Species change over time. Biological change over time is the consequence of the interactions of (1) the potential for a species to increase its numbers, (2) the genetic variability of offspring due to mutation and recombination of genes, (3) a finite supply of the resources required for life and (4) natural selection. The consequences of change over time provide a scientific explanation for the fossil record of ancient life forms and for the striking molecular similarities observed among the diverse species of living organisms. Changes in DNA (mutations) occur spontaneously at low rates. Some of these changes make no difference to the organism, whereas others can change cells and organisms. Only mutations in germ cells have the potential to create the variation that changes an organism?s future offspring.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

SC-HS-3.5.2: Students will:

SC-HS-3.5.2.b: justify explanations of organism survival based on scientific understandings of behavior.

SC-HS-3.5.2.b.1: The broad patterns of behavior exhibited by organisms have changed over time through natural selection to ensure reproductive success. Organisms often live in unpredictable environments, so their behavioral responses must be flexible enough to deal with uncertainty and change. Behaviors often have an adaptive logic.

 Evolution: Mutation and Selection
 Evolution: Natural and Artificial Selection
 Microevolution
 Natural Selection
 Rabbit Population by Season
 Rainfall and Bird Beaks

SC-HS-4: Unifying Concepts

SC-HS-4.6: Energy Transformations

SC-HS-4.6.1: Students will:

SC-HS-4.6.1.a: explain the relationships and connections between matter, energy, living systems and the physical environment;

 Carbon Cycle
 Cell Energy Cycle

SC-HS-4.6.1.b: give examples of conservation of matter and energy.

SC-HS-4.6.1.b.1: As matter and energy flow through different organizational levels (e.g., cells, organs, organisms, communities) and between living systems and the physical environment, chemical elements are recombined in different ways. Each recombination results in storage and dissipation of energy into the environment as heat. Matter and energy are conserved in each change.

 Food Chain

SC-HS-4.6.2: Students will:

SC-HS-4.6.2.a: predict wave behavior and energy transfer;

 2D Collisions
 Ripple Tank

SC-HS-4.6.4: Students will:

SC-HS-4.6.4.a: describe the components and reservoirs involved in biogeochemical cycles (water, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and oxygen);

 Carbon Cycle
 Cell Energy Cycle

SC-HS-4.6.4.b: explain the movement of matter and energy in biogeochemical cycles and related phenomena.

SC-HS-4.6.4.b.1: The total energy of the universe is constant. Energy can change forms and/or be transferred in many ways, but it can neither be created nor destroyed. Movement of matter between reservoirs is driven by Earth?s internal and external sources of energy. These movements are often accompanied by a change in physical and chemical properties of the matter. Carbon, for example, occurs in carbonate rocks such as limestone, in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide gas, in water as dissolved carbon dioxide and in all organisms as complex molecules that control the chemistry of life.

 2D Collisions
 Air Track
 Cell Energy Cycle
 Energy Conversion in a System
 Energy of a Pendulum
 Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects
 Roller Coaster Physics

SC-HS-4.6.5: Students will describe and explain the role of carbon-containing molecules and chemical reactions in energy transfer in living systems. Living systems require a continuous input of energy to maintain their chemical and physical organization since the universal tendency is toward more disorganized states. The energy for life primarily derives from the Sun. Plants capture energy by absorbing light and using it to break weaker bonds in reactants (such as carbon dioxide and water) in chemical reactions that result in the formation of carbon-containing molecules. These molecules can be used to assemble larger molecules (e.g., DNA, proteins, sugars, fats). In addition, the energy released when these molecules react with oxygen to form very strong bonds can be used as sources of energy for life processes.

 Cell Energy Cycle
 Photosynthesis Lab

SC-HS-4.6.6: Students will understand that heat is the manifestation of the random motion and vibrations of atoms.

 Temperature and Particle Motion

SC-HS-4.6.10: Students will:

SC-HS-4.6.10.a: identify the components and mechanisms of energy stored and released from food molecules (photosynthesis and respiration);

 Cell Energy Cycle

SC-HS-4.6.10.b: apply information to real-world situations.

SC-HS-4.6.10.b.1: Energy is released when the bonds of food molecules are broken and new compounds with lower energy bonds are formed. Cells usually store this energy temporarily in the phosphate bonds of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). During the process of cellular respiration, some energy is lost as heat.

 Cell Energy Cycle

SC-HS-4.6.11: Students will:

SC-HS-4.6.11.a: explain the difference between alpha and beta decay, fission and fusion;

 Nuclear Decay

SC-HS-4.7: Interdependence

SC-HS-4.7.1: Students will:

SC-HS-4.7.1.a: analyze relationships and interactions among organisms in ecosystems;

 Food Chain

SC-HS-4.7.1.b: predict the effects on other organisms of changes to one or more components of the ecosystem.

SC-HS-4.7.1.b.1: Organisms both cooperate and compete in ecosystems. Often changes in one component of an ecosystem will have effects on the entire system that are difficult to predict. The interrelationships and interdependencies of these organisms may generate ecosystems that are stable for hundreds or thousands of years.

 Food Chain

SC-HS-4.7.2: Students will:

SC-HS-4.7.2.a: evaluate proposed solutions from multiple perspectives to environmental problems caused by human interaction;

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors
 Pond Ecosystem

SC-HS-4.7.5: Students will:

SC-HS-4.7.5.a: predict the consequences of changes in resources to a population;

 Food Chain

SC-HS-4.7.5.b: select or defend solutions to real-world problems of population control.

SC-HS-4.7.5.b.1: Living organisms have the capacity to produce populations of infinite size. However, behaviors, environments and resources influence the size of populations. Models (e.g., mathematical, physical, conceptual) can be used to make predictions about changes in the size or rate of growth of a population.

 Coral Reefs 1 - Abiotic Factors
 Food Chain
 Rabbit Population by Season

Correlation last revised: 4/4/2018

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.